5 Things to Expect When You Open a Brokerage Account

Know what you'll need when you're ready to start investing through a brokerage.

Apr 27, 2014 at 9:00AM

If you're reading this, you may be planning to open a brokerage account to start investing. Here are five things to expect if you do.

1. Be prepared to verify your identity. This will likely include your Social Security or other tax identification number. Or it could be a driver's license or passport information, or some form of other government-issued identification. The Securities and Exchange Commission and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority require brokerage firms to ask for this information. And firms use the information for tax-reporting purposes and to comply with the USA PATRIOT Act.

2. You'll be asked about your financial situation. This may include your employment status and financial information, such as your annual income and net worth. Also expect questions about your investment objectives and the amount of risk you're willing to take on. If your broker is recommending investments to you, SEC and FINRA rules require that your broker collect this information. In addition, the information can help your broker recommend suitable investments.

3. Decide whether you want a cash account or margin loan account. Most brokerage firms offer at least two types of accounts -- a cash account and a margin loan account (often called a "margin account"). In a cash account, you must pay for your securities in full at the time of purchase. In a margin loan account, although you must eventually pay for your securities in full, your broker can lend you funds at the time of purchase, with the securities in your portfolio serving as collateral for the loan. This is called buying securities "on margin." The shortfall between the purchase price and the amount of money you put in is a loan from the brokerage firm, and you will incur interest costs, just as with any other loan. Some firms automatically place you in a margin account unless you make it clear you want a cash account.

4. Determine how you want to manage your uninvested cash. Sometimes there is cash in your account that hasn't been invested. For example, you may have just deposited money into your account without giving instructions on how to invest it, or you may have received cash dividends or interest. Your brokerage firm typically will automatically place -- or "sweep" -- that cash into a cash management program (customarily known as a "cash sweep" program). On your new account application, your brokerage firm may ask you to select a cash management program. These programs offer different benefits and risks, including different interest rates and insurance coverage. Be sure you understand the different features of the cash management programs that your firm offers, so that you can make an informed decision if you are asked to choose one.

5. Decide who will make the final decisions for your account. You will have final say on investment decisions in your account unless you give "discretionary authority" in writing to another person, such as your financial professional. With discretionary authority, this person may invest your money without consulting you about the price, amount or type of security, or timing of the trades that are placed for your account. Some firms allow you to indicate who has discretionary authority over the account on the new account application. Others require separate documentation.

If you haven't already done so, make sure you check out the background of your broker and brokerage firm before you open an account with them. Look up your broker and firm on FINRA Brokercheck or call toll-free (800) 289-9999.

For more information about saving and investing visit the investors section of FINRA.org.

FINRA is the largest independent regulator for all securities firms doing business in the United States. Our chief role is to protect investors by maintaining the fairness of the U.S. capital markets. FINRA does not endorse, sponsor, or guarantee, nor is it sponsored by, any advertisers on this site, and any dealings with those advertisers are solely between you and the advertisers.


Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

4 in 5 Americans Are Ignoring Buffett's Warning

Don't be one of them.

Jun 12, 2015 at 5:01PM

Admitting fear is difficult.

So you can imagine how shocked I was to find out Warren Buffett recently told a select number of investors about the cutting-edge technology that's keeping him awake at night.

This past May, The Motley Fool sent 8 of its best stock analysts to Omaha, Nebraska to attend the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting. CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger fielded questions for nearly 6 hours.
The catch was: Attendees weren't allowed to record any of it. No audio. No video. 

Our team of analysts wrote down every single word Buffett and Munger uttered. Over 16,000 words. But only two words stood out to me as I read the detailed transcript of the event: "Real threat."

That's how Buffett responded when asked about this emerging market that is already expected to be worth more than $2 trillion in the U.S. alone. Google has already put some of its best engineers behind the technology powering this trend. 

The amazing thing is, while Buffett may be nervous, the rest of us can invest in this new industry BEFORE the old money realizes what hit them.

KPMG advises we're "on the cusp of revolutionary change" coming much "sooner than you think."

Even one legendary MIT professor had to recant his position that the technology was "beyond the capability of computer science." (He recently confessed to The Wall Street Journal that he's now a believer and amazed "how quickly this technology caught on.")

Yet according to one J.D. Power and Associates survey, only 1 in 5 Americans are even interested in this technology, much less ready to invest in it. Needless to say, you haven't missed your window of opportunity. 

Think about how many amazing technologies you've watched soar to new heights while you kick yourself thinking, "I knew about that technology before everyone was talking about it, but I just sat on my hands." 

Don't let that happen again. This time, it should be your family telling you, "I can't believe you knew about and invested in that technology so early on."

That's why I hope you take just a few minutes to access the exclusive research our team of analysts has put together on this industry and the one stock positioned to capitalize on this major shift.

Click here to learn about this incredible technology before Buffett stops being scared and starts buying!

David Hanson owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway and American Express. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Google, and Coca-Cola.We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

©1995-2014 The Motley Fool. All rights reserved. | Privacy/Legal Information