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Rich Dad vs. Orman: Finance Titans Tweet It Out

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What happens when two titans of multimedia financial advice dynasties ruffle one another's feathers? They Tweet their tiff, of course.

Early this week, finance gurus Robert Kiyosaki and Suze Orman took to the Twitter stage for an impromptu philosophical smackdown, disparaging each other's guru-ness 140 characters at a time.

"Suze Orman and Robert Kiyosaki in Advice Showdown," announced InvestmentNews.com, whose top headlines before the March 2 all-star Twitter snit were Schwab's former head of national sales returning to the company and lawmakers hoping the Senate will pass HR 4154, extending the 2009 estate tax rate on $3.5 million-plus estates.

We'll go to the Kiyosaki vs. Orman Twitter Tiff play-by-play in a moment. First, a little background on our dueling gurus.

Ladies and gentlemen, the contenders
In one corner is Suze Orman, the tanned and toothy proponent of empowerment-laced thrift-focused financial advice. "People first, then money, then things" is her mantra; colorful jackets are her signature style. Saturday Night Live's Kristen Wiig does a dead-on spoof, which is closer to a character study than a caricature.

In the other corner is Robert Kiyosaki, who built his "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" cottage industry by espousing wealth-building through real estate, investing in businesses, trading options, and inviting followers to attend his traveling money-making road show and sign up for his proprietary systems. He, like Orman, has taken plenty of public lashings -- not from comedians, but critics who say he's a brilliant motivational speaker who delivers wealth-reducing financial advice. 

He encourages followers to create an empire; she advises callers to build a financial bunker. She says pay off the mortgage; he says take on another and another. She likes mutual funds; he likes options. She champions 401(k) plans; he says the whole system is nothing but a Ponzi scheme.

Both have products to sell and personalities to protect, which brings us to the cyberspace smackdown.

Ding, ding, ding! Round one!
Kiyosaki starts the Twitter snit with this catty comment: "I can't believe this lady -@suzeormanshow. No way in hell she believes what she teaches."

Orman fires back in exclamatory upper case: "AT LEAST @theRealKiyosaki I DID NOT LEAD MILLIONS OF PEOPLE DOWN THE PATH TO LOSE ALL THEIR MONEY IN REAL ESTATE AS YOU DID. SHAME ON YOU"

Kiyosaki hisses: "If we are talking losses @suzeormanshow how about the TRILLIONS lost through 401K's http://ow.ly/1cZW4." That link points to Time magazine's "Why It's Time to Retire the 401(k)."

One minute later he dishes what appears to be his parting bon mot: "Real Estate flippers may have lost $, but I teach investing for cash flow, not capital gains. Good convo @suzeormanshow"

After a 12-minute silence from the Orman camp, Kiyosaki heads back to his corner casually tossing off one final dig under the guise of just another one of his signature Twitter Zen Money Moments: "We all require a different mentor. Smart ones want to learn to make millions w cash flow, others just need to be scolded."

Declare a winner!
Yes, we're encouraging you to take sides. Which guru should get the win? Should points be deducted for punches below the belt? Weigh in with your comments on this heavyweight showdown (and extra credit if you state a convincing case in 140 characters or less)!

Related links:

Until it is revealed otherwise (e.g., spelled out in her bowl of Alphabet Soup, for instance) Tina Fey will be interim guru for Fool.com writer Dayana Yochim. The Fool's disclosure policy is guru-neutral.


Read/Post Comments (48) | Recommend This Article (30)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 9:50 AM, TMFJoeInvestor wrote:

    Advantage: @suzeormanshow.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 9:58 AM, TMFTypeoh wrote:

    They all have good and advice, and they all have bad advice.

    Many fault (incorrectly) kyioski for pushing people into the housing market. Well, if they acutally read what he wrote, they NEVER would have bought a house they couldn't afford. He teaches to invest for cash flow, not captial gains. Poeple who invested for cash flow are doing very well, and even better in this down market.

    Suzy orman's investing advice is OK at best, but its nothiing compared to the motley fool.

    I can say that the WORST of all is David Bach. Read his books, and you can see what terrible investing advice he had given (he is MUCH more responsible for putting people in houses they couldn't afford than kiyoski.)

    Of all of them, i would say dave ramsey has the best advice for the average joe. However, all of them give pretty poor investing advice.

    My suggestion:

    Do what ramsey says for getting out of debt.

    Do whay kyiosaki says for increase your real estate portfolio.

    Do what the motley fool says for investing advice.

    Do what Dave Bach says for saving a little bit more each month.

    Ignore all other advice.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:09 AM, TMFBoiseKen wrote:

    Very honestly, I have benefited from both of their books. Suze's book, "young, fabulous, and broke" was my first real introduction into money management. It was a 100% wake-up call and very digestible. If I had had read, "Rich Dad" first, i would not be where I am.

    Suze dished it straight and easy. She has made & lost money in her life and is very believable.

    Kyiosaki is a little different. I enjoy his counter-intuitive spin. He is in a dialectic with Dave Ramsey in my financial mind. Pay off debt vs. Leverage it. Very interesting concepts. I'll be debt free, thank you. But the concepts of investing for "cash flow" have been very enlightening. His books are worth a read.

    I don't know who wins -- don't really care. I do appreciate their differences and take a bit from each person. I would LOVE a 2 hour program (pay-per-view?? I'll help you guys market it!) with Dave and/or Tom from the Fool, sitting down with Dave Ramsey, Suze, and Kyiosaki dishing out the best path to financial stability and wealth.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:13 AM, catoismymotor wrote:

    Suzie wants you sock away money, minimize risk, minimize your exposure to debt. And she has a product to sell.

    Robert wants you to put your money and/or a lender's money to work in stocks and real estate. And he has a procuct to sell.

    Who is right? Neither. Neither has the magic formula for your success. The same people that follow every word either of these two says out loud or puts in print is setting themselves up to for mediocre results. If you take the best parts of what they have to offer and make it a mishmash that best suits your temperment and situation you are better off.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:15 AM, sesameball wrote:

    Kiyosaki clearly wins.

    Anyone can tell you to cut up your credit cards and decrease saving - heck, even a monkey can do that. It doesn't require much thought to save money. But Kiyosaki gives insight on how to think outside of box, as opposed to Suze Orman.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:18 AM, JibJabs wrote:

    Easy. Benjamin Graham wins. Always does.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:22 AM, sesameball wrote:

    Kiyosaki hands down.

    Anyone can tell you to cut up your credit cards and decrease saving - heck, even a monkey can do that. It's jawbreaking to see how many people are in over their heads in debt, but I guess that's because no one ever told them not to buy what they can't afford. But seriously, common sense anyone?

    Kiyosaki gives insight on how to think outside of box, as opposed to Suze Orman. Instead of trying to fight debt, he gives you a new perspective on it and teaches you how to take advantage of it. And you can't blame him for the housing crash either, because he does clearly write that you should invest for cashflow, meaning market downturns shouldn't impact your investment as dearly.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 11:37 AM, hot1053 wrote:

    In the exchange Kiyosaki got a slight edge. I would like to point one thing out. I don't recall Kiyosaki saying invest in options much at all in his books. He mostly said invest in education, stocks, mutual funds, commodities, businesses, and real estate.

    The last I heard, he said invest in education, real estate and silver.

    Robert believes the market and the dollar is over valued. The market will eventually have baby boomers pulling all of their money out leading to stocks going down. The dollar will fall because of booming deflicts in our will recoverspending policy, social security (now the red this year for the first time), and medicare.

    He believes continuing education in all the catagories he discusses investing in is the key to surviving these troubling times.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 11:41 AM, TMFKris wrote:

    Kiyosaki should win just for effort. Orman doesn't say anything to back herself up, just states something she didn't do (help people lose money in RE). Of course, Kiyosaki doesn't say anything of substance either. Yay Twitter!

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 1:48 PM, FBCinvestor wrote:

    typeoh - Please explain your beef with Bach's housing plan.

    My understanding is that he encourages people to buy half the house they want, but make extra payments equal to what your "dream" mortgage would have been. Then 5-7 years later you have totally paid for your house. Sell it, then buy the house you wanted the first time basically putting 50% down. You then pay 5-7 years on the exact same mortgage amount you had before and in about 10 years total you own your dream house free and clear.

    This is based on some of his older books, so his current advise may have changed.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 2:19 PM, MockMM wrote:

    Motley Fool wins!

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 3:01 PM, TangoSukka wrote:

    Jim Cramer - win!

    and by "win", i mean epic fail

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 4:07 PM, TMFRosetint wrote:

    Personal finance is boring & easy, and Orman didn't even really try, so I'll give to Kiyosaki even though the man really has no idea what he's talking about in regard to just about anything and even encourages folks to engage in illegal behavior in Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

    QFT @ JibJabs for giving Ben Graham his props.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 4:57 PM, christopherstory wrote:

    Rich dad wins! He is all about growing your money, He is about working harder but working smarter. Everything rich dad teaches is what this country was built on.

    Rich dad sheds light on the fact that there is a diferent way to make money. Showing you that the middle class is built on jobs and the 1% of the 99% of the population make the jobs for the 99%. Suze just tells you the obvious. I wouldn't want to pay for someone to tell me that i can't afford something.

    If you can't figure out if you can't afford something and have to call suze you are just wanting validation that you are broke.

    Rich dad teachs you what the schools (public and colleges) don't teach. He is all about not being in the rat race and living with in your mean and still growing your money.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 5:40 PM, daliya wrote:

    read

    quants by Scott Patterson.

    Putting your money under the mattress might be best way to go . daliya

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 6:26 PM, NotJesseL wrote:

    I think the whole thing is too silly. And now, for the man with three noses.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 6:28 PM, NotJesseL wrote:

    I think the whole thing is too silly.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 7:07 PM, Boydski wrote:

    Robert all the way. She unfortunately displayed her ignorance by making comments related to flipping houses and associating that paradigm to him.

    Oh, and @typeoh - You're right on the money! There's wisdom in the council of many.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 7:34 PM, DDHv wrote:

    Whenever several people look at something complicated, remember the story of the blind men and the elephant! Example: the major Greek philosophers were Archimedes (materialism), Aristotle (animism) and Plato (mind is everything). Many have noted that Genesis chapter 1 uses the Hebrew word Bara (create) for the creation of the physical universe, the creation of the active universe, and the creation of the mental universe. So it is the three blind philosophers and the universe, each recognizing only part of God's creation.

    Handling finances has many possible viewpoints!

    If there is a multiple discussion, Prabai of "The Dhando Investor" should be included. It is best to apply each to that part of finances that fits your own situation best, and ignore each where they don't fit.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 8:44 PM, ynotc wrote:

    Rich Dad wins. I don't agree with leveraging yourself to the hilt but at least when you own real estate you have something that is inflation proof and has intrinsic value.

    Most mutual funds are for suckers as we have seen from the recent crash. If your going to invest it must be value investing like TMF teaches.

    Susie Orman does not teach those principals.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:20 PM, CNCGeek wrote:

    Rich Dad promotes a philosophy that wins when common sense and logic are applied. All of us foolish investors recognize that a dollar saved today is worth $.98 tomorrow. That's why financial investing is critical to the preservation and growth of our wealth. Robert offer's us the knowledge needed to avoid costly mistakes when using real estate to build our cash flow. Those who believe they will get rich quick are likely to fail any system (Rich Dad, TMF, Suzie, . . .) because they are lead by their emotions rather than the numbers.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2010, at 10:33 PM, JDkool wrote:

    There is a reason Kiyosakis' book Rich Dad Poor Dad, "Rocked the financial world". It went against what all the experts (i.e. Suze Orman) have said for years, and what we have grown up with. Save your money, be safe, and take as little risk as possible. While both of these gurus (and they both are..) give different advice, its like comparing baseball, and basketball. Yes, they both are sports (investing), but they are both playing different games, and for that reason have different strategies. Therefore, their aim is for different groups of people. Just as typeoh said in the first comment of this thread..

    "They all have good and advice, and they all have bad advice.

    Many fault (incorrectly) kyioski for pushing people into the housing market. Well, if they acutally read what he wrote, they NEVER would have bought a house they couldn't afford. He teaches to invest for cash flow, not captial gains. Poeple who invested for cash flow are doing very well, and even better in this down market."

    Kiyosakis' advice:- Take on some risk, incur GOOD debt (the debt that brings you positive cash-flow)

    Ormans' advice:- Save your money, be safe, take as little risk as you can.

    Im not saying one gives better advice than the other, as the past couple years will show you, you can loose money no matter where you put for money.

    But its the way you want to GO ABOUT investing, which determines who you choose to follow. More conservative.. Orman. More aggressive, Kiyosaki.

    They are both right, just for different types of investors.

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2010, at 10:07 AM, solarfool314 wrote:

    I'll give Ms Orman the win. I'm no gambler, if I was I would either be richer or broke. Probably broke! As it is I'm solvent and have saved the money to take advantage of the knowledge of the Fools in Motley.

    Yours, CH

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2010, at 10:26 AM, TMFEditorsDesk wrote:

    I like Suze Orman...she doles out common sense with some pizzazz.

    -Anand (TMFBomb)

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2010, at 2:37 PM, Rowants wrote:

    The easy way to get rich- Write a book called how to get rich and put someone hot on the cover.

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2010, at 2:59 PM, JBG189 wrote:

    If you want to know why Kiyosakis has zero (no, make that negative) value, a VERY comprehensive analysis of this lies and stupidity has been done by John T. Reed:

    http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html

    I'm not a follower of Reed. I read RDPD and did some google searching on Kiyosaki, which led me to this site. I'm simply amazed at how comprehensive it is (but he's been adding to it for over 10 years now, so).

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 1:07 AM, SnapDave wrote:

    Read JGB's link and others. I've known about Kiosaki for a long time. His background is motivational speaking period. His advice is vague for a reason, he lied about all his real estate experience. The Fool has been very critical of Cramer - with good reason - why is this slimeball given a pass? Shame on you Dayana for not doing your homework. Maybe this is just another sloppy article intended to stir up s--- more than anything?

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 1:07 AM, SnapDave wrote:

    Read JGB's link and others. I've known about Kiosaki for a long time. His background is motivational speaking period. His advice is vague for a reason, he lied about all his real estate experience. The Fool has been very critical of Cramer - with good reason - why is this slimeball given a pass? Shame on you Dayana for not doing your homework. Maybe this is just another sloppy article intended to stir up s--- more than anything?

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 3:20 PM, ByrneShill wrote:

    Kiyosaki is a crook. He's never made a dime on real estate until he started peddling his books. All the money he makes, he makes by selling books and strong-arming people to attend speech of his representatives at quite a high fee. The TV show The fifth estate (on CBC) had an episode on him, and it was obvious he is a crook who'll pressure-sell you an empty speech which is mostly a selling pitch for another (moe expensive) selling pitch.

    I'd stay away from anything related to this crook.

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 4:43 PM, 5000monkey wrote:

    Rich dad wins. I'm currently living in a house that more than pays for itself (I have three tennents in my 4-plex) I bought it for no money down and got money back on the deal to boot. Orman would have never given me the idea to do something like that. Kiyosaki never advised people to invest in equity or to flip. He counseled that your house is a liability not an asset. And he was right. His advise "invest for cash flow" his preferred vehicle for that was real estate, but if you invested in business or stocks for cash flow and not for equity position you'd still be doing fine.

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 4:43 PM, 5000monkey wrote:

    Rich dad wins. I'm currently living in a house that more than pays for itself (I have three tennents in my 4-plex) I bought it for no money down and got money back on the deal to boot. Orman would have never given me the idea to do something like that. Kiyosaki never advised people to invest in equity or to flip. He counseled that your house is a liability not an asset. And he was right. His advise "invest for cash flow" his preferred vehicle for that was real estate, but if you invested in business or stocks for cash flow and not for equity position you'd still be doing fine.

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 6:26 PM, ejclason2 wrote:

    I've seen bits and pieces of Orman's specials on PBS. Her advice seems pretty common sense and conservative. I wouldn't pay for it, heck I never watch much of it when it is free.

    My only exposure to Kiyosakis was when my sister-in-lay had us play the Rich Dad Poor Dad game. The instructions said something to the effect that if you play the game frequently, it would cause a good investing gestalt (my word) to sink in over time. I haven't read any of his books, but in the game investing in real estate is clearly better than investing in stock. And although there is a cash-flow from real estate, the big money is made when random opportunities occur to sell your real estate at a huge profit.

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 8:25 PM, TMFRosetint wrote:

    Finally someone mentioned Mr. Reed's website. I came back to this article after my initial post to do so, when it came to mind that I more-or-less called Mr. Kiyosaki an idiot and claimed that he suggests people should engage in illegal activities in Rich Dad, Poor Dad without qualifying either of those statements.

    Since it's already been posted in this thread, I won't bother to re-post it since that was my source.

    Also, Rich Dad is like the Easter Bunny. He doesn't exist.

  • Report this Comment On March 08, 2010, at 8:27 PM, TMFRosetint wrote:

    Finally someone mentioned Mr. Reed's website. I came back to this article after my initial post to do so, when it came to mind that I more-or-less called Mr. Kiyosaki an idiot and claimed that he suggests people should engage in illegal activities in Rich Dad, Poor Dad without qualifying either of those statements.

    Since it's already been posted in this thread, I won't bother to re-post it since that was my source.

    Also, Rich Dad is like the Easter Bunny. He doesn't exist.

  • Report this Comment On March 09, 2010, at 1:00 PM, alexnbeth wrote:

    Here's the skinny: Robert's direction is make money, Suzie's direction is save money.

    Making money involves a evaluating risk, saving money is about avoiding risk.

    So, if you want to become wealthy, and can tolerate the inevitable risk...then Robert's your man.

    If all you want to do is ensure a stable retirement, delaying and evaluating any gratification, the Suzie's your (wo)man.

    So, as this is an investing, capitalist forum, Robert is the winner!!

    Alex

  • Report this Comment On March 09, 2010, at 3:30 PM, JBG189 wrote:

    "Like him or not, his book has good practical advice." No sorry, that is most certainly NOT in his books, which amount to repetitive platitudes and altruisms. To be clear, I enjoyed reading the book, as it took a couple hours and didn’t hurt my head. And it can get you fired up (as already stated Robert has no value aside from being an excellent motivational speaker), which is nice, but as a substantive how-to book, it’s 100% worthless.

    "Since I read the book and have no recollection of these "illegal activities" would anyone care to enlighten me"

    If you really want to know them all, read the link.

    http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html

    The very top of the site will provide some relevant highlights. I think Reed is splitting hairs with some of his call-outs, but I can't say anything he says is wrong.

    Nothing Bobby advocates is likely to end you in jail, despite the fact that several of his suggestions/implications are clear criminal violations of the tax-code and SEC regulations. (And could get you a stay in the slammer).

    He does state several blatant lies that illustrate his bull-carpedness, e.g., taking two companies public (100% false and proved to be false).

    [[Also, on a personal note, even before I read Reeds work up of him, did anyone else read the story about the Canvas wallet business, and how it failed because he refused to use sweat-shops; and think, yeah right, your business failed and now you're making sympathetic excuses.... but that was just my personal impression of that story.]]

  • Report this Comment On March 10, 2010, at 10:04 AM, MORK000 wrote:

    I like Suse because sheis way! way! better looking than him.

  • Report this Comment On March 10, 2010, at 3:05 PM, miteycasey wrote:

    Here's the skinny: Robert's direction is make money, Suzie's direction is save money. Making money involves a evaluating risk, saving money is about avoiding risk. So, if you want to become wealthy, and can tolerate the inevitable risk...then Robert's your man.

    If all you want to do is ensure a stable retirement, delaying and evaluating any gratification, the Suzie's your (wo)man.

    Totally agree with this.

    Robert wants you to be your own boss. Suzie wants you to work for others and save.

    Where is the biggest opportunity to be rich?

    Easily owning your own company and creating cash flow.

    So, as this is an investing, capitalist forum, Robert is the winner!!

  • Report this Comment On March 10, 2010, at 4:37 PM, roetep wrote:

    Advantage Kiyosaki

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 12:18 PM, Tinman200 wrote:

    Advantage Kiyosaki -- and miteycasey, FTW!!

    Orman is a punishment-based, fear-based bunker mentality that going to get a lot of people who played it "safe" into a world of hurt. I've seen too many safe little 401Ks evaporate over the last ten years.

    Being your own boss is the only way to go if you really want to thrive in current economic conditions and be prepared for coming changes.

    This is not your grandfather's economy. Hell, it's not even my father's economy. Change always involves risk. Kiyosaki has the right moves.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 2:00 PM, belate wrote:

    I think Suze appeals to working class income groups. Her advice seems geared for those who approach financial decisions a bit on the cautious side. She seems to exhort more of a down-to-earth way of looking at things with an emphasis on family and people, rather than speculation, consumption, and the constant desire for more. It's a bit of a sad commentary on us as a people when "more" rather than "enough" is the goal of our life. "More" seems to be open-ended.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 4:06 PM, cpaMike46 wrote:

    I agree with typeoh. So many advisors take them self to seriously and don't regognize others good advice.

    I have been investing for 40 years and Motley Fool is the best I've found. "Here are some good leads, do your own research before you jump".

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 5:03 PM, JAlexandratos wrote:

    Who wins? BOTH of them, because the Motley Fool and a bunch of Fools and other fools have given their brands free advertising. Those of you who talked about "Suze" and "Robert" (known as "Bob" until he got rich) as if you're on a first name basis with them, get a grip. They are not your buddies and will not invite you into their mansions for a beer.

    My take? Saving money is always a good idea. Orman talks simple common sense that all too many people in the US do not want to hear. I would hope that most people on Motley Fool are here to learn how to make money wisely, not "get rich quickly".

    Kiyosaki is a get-rich-quick motivational speaker with no professional background in what he is selling. In addition, he has advocated meeting / sucking up to rich people in order to get (illegal!) inside stock tips. According to John T. Reed, Kiyosaki offers no solid, verifiable proof for his alleged past big real estate deals. Texans have a saying about that: "All hat, no cattle". Why buy advice on ranching from a slick city dude?

    Buying glitter like Rolex watches and fast cars (Kiyosaki style) is not smart. Cautiously investing in real estate is a good idea. Kiyosaki does not preach caution- he talks about his fancy lifestyle. Preaching as if "no money down" and "huge profit" are normal real estate practices is just plain small-f foolish. Selling expensive motivational talks is smart, but paying for them is dumb.

    I use the word "preach" because that is the style motivational speakers use. They certainly do not teach boring old unpopular but workable techniques. That's too much like real work.

    How have I been able to invest in real estate? I saved money for a down payment, used several weeks to look at houses, and bought one. Yes, I have "positive cash flow", but not enough to live on. However, some very nice people are paying for my mortgage. Any idiot can use the words "positive cash flow", but only an experienced person can show you the sane, cautious, slow way to make money in real estate, and not at a "free 3 hour seminar" or over an expensive weekend.

    While both Orman and Kiyosaki have won the public relations game, Orman wins out in her financial advice. Real estate is also a good investment, but do not go to motivational speaker Kiyosaki for any advice. If you need motivation, talk to people you love. If you need real estate advice, read "Landlording: A Handy Manual for Scrupulous Landlords" by Leigh Robinson. If you need investing advice, read John Bogle's books and earlier parts of the Motley Fool. The recent stuff from MF is heavily self-promotional and verging on get rich quick, unfortunately.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 6:19 PM, Prince40 wrote:

    Why take sides?

    Doesn't each one of them have valid points? Didn't each one of them prove that road to riches have many shapes?

    Doesn't your own style of investing depend on what turns you on, what you understand and feel most comfortable with and how the economy is doing?

    As for me.....for little I know....some things never change....just read Ben Graham. It was true then, it is true now and it will always be true. At the end, what matters is fundamentals.....everything else is just speculation and noise......just ask Warren Buffett....or Peter Lynch.....:)))))

    Both, Suze Orman and Robert Kiyosaki are very talented and great people. They just have different views on achieving financial stability and in my view, they both deserve tremendous amount of respect because they not only understand how money works, but they make it work.

    To both of you I bow.......

    Prince (yes...from Minneapolis)

    :)))))

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 7:41 PM, RaiddinnRZ wrote:

    Advantage Kiyosaki.

    Both have flaws, but system wise Kiyosaki's mantra of doing your homework and then translating that knowledge into positive cash flow is miles better than anything Suze Orman has.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 7:47 PM, RaiddinnRZ wrote:

    Advantage Kiyosaki.

    His mantra of doing your homework and then translating superior knowledge into positive cash flow over and over again is miles better than anything Suze Orman has.

    Both have flaws, but at least he can point hers out well. She just proved she is completely ignorant of what he is about.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2010, at 10:57 PM, 21820b wrote:

    I find both of them rather obnoxious

  • Report this Comment On March 13, 2010, at 8:28 AM, Chromantix wrote:

    They both win. Why?

    Because you're talking about their investment strategies instead of your own. When we get to compare two Fools' strategies, then the entire community wins.

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(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 1128711, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 10/1/2014 4:14:08 AM

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Dayana Yochim
TMFSchool

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