Intel Strives to Educate and Empower Girls Around the World

Intel Strives to Educate and Empower Girls Around the World

Intel Advances Commitment through Diverse Partnerships, Including 10x10 Film and Social Action Campaign

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- In celebration of the United Nations’ first International Day of the Girl today, Intel Corporation is expanding its global commitment to further education for girls and women by announcing multiple strategic partnerships and programs. Millions of girls around the world have limited or no access to education. Intel believes that broader access to education for girls and women will significantly catalyze social progress and help drive worldwide economic growth.

Intel’s key engagement is with 10x10, a global action campaign that seeks to educate and empower girls around the world. “Girl Rising,” 10x10’s full-length feature film and the centerpiece of this campaign,reveals the extraordinary stories of real girls tackling nearly impossible odds on the road to education. Scheduled for a March premiere, the documentary amplifies the importance of investing in girls and aims to increase understanding and empathy so people are compelled to take action.

To further the powerful message of “Girl Rising,” Intelis collaborating with notable partners and policy makers to provide insight into the economic development and policy challenges facing girls around the world. Research consistently proves that educating girls breaks the cycle of generational poverty. For example:

  • When 10 percent more girls go to school, a country’s GDP can increase by 3 percent.1
  • Girls and women reinvest 90 percent of their income.2

“Intel has worked for decades to improve education around the world,” said Shelly Esque, vice president of Intel’s Corporate Affairs Group and president of the Intel Foundation. “If we can close the education gap with girls, we will have transformed their lives and the lives of everyone they touch.”

Through access to technology, scholarships and community learning programs, Intel provides girls and women with opportunities for quality education and personal growth. Intel’s programs equip women with access to the information they need to excel. With a 21st century skillset and a newfound level of confidence, girls and women can advance their ideas and personal drive to change their lives. In addition to 10x10, Intel’s influential programs include:

  • Intel Learn: The Intel Learn Program provides opportunities for young learners in developing countries to gain key skills needed for tomorrow’s success, focusing on technology literacy, problem-solving and collaboration. The initiative has reached approximately 900,000 girls and young women in 18 countries around the world since its founding in 2004.
  • Intel Teach: This global program provides K-12 teachers with the tools they need, including next-generation technology training, to become stronger educators and to make a difference in the lives of their students. To date, Intel has trained more than 5 million female teachers globally.
  • Intel Easy Steps: Established in 2010, this technology literacy program provides adult women training in entrepreneurship and business skills, enabling them to elevate themselves professionally and break through barriers to personal economic growth. To date, Intel Easy Steps has reached approximately 95,000 women in 20 countries around the world.
  • Intel Computer Clubhouse Network: The Intel Computer Clubhouse Network offers an after-school, community-based learning program that allows girls and boys from underserved communities to explore ideas, develop skills and build self-confidence through the use of technology. The program reaches more than 25,000 youths through 100 clubhouses in 20 countries.
  • Ashoka Changemakers: Intel and Ashoka Changemakers have launched "She Will Innovate: Technology Solutions Enriching the Lives of Girls," a competition open to innovators everywhere. On Nov. 14, more than $30,000 in prizes will be awarded to those with the most innovative digital technologies that enable girls and women to live healthier, smarter and more meaningful lives. Public voting began today.
  • Ashoka Fellows: Intel has partnered with Ashoka on the Ashoka Fellows program, which sponsors social entrepreneurs and a wide community of change-makers with innovative technology solutions to address pressing problems facing women and girls.
  • Half the Sky Movement: Intel is supporting Half the Sky Movement: The Game, which seeks to raise awareness and inspire action to turn oppression into opportunity for women and girls worldwide. The game launches Nov. 13 on Facebook.
  • Code for Good: Through the Code for Good initiative, Intel employees collaborate with Intel partners, including Room to Read and World Pulse, to develop mobile applications and solutions that address challenges girls face in education.
  • Equal Futures Partnership: To further Intel’s commitment to advancing girls and women through education and empowerment, Intel supports U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s initiative, the Equal Futures Partnership, in which Intel is studying the gender gap in women’s access to and use of the Internet.

About Intel’s Education Commitment

In this increasingly global economy, Intel recognizes that curiosity, critical thinking and a strong foundation in math and science are necessary for tomorrow’s workforce to compete for the high-tech jobs of the 21st century. Over the past decade alone, Intel and the Intel Foundation have invested more than $1 billion, and Intel employees have donated close to 3 million volunteer hours toward improving education in more than 60 countries.

About Intel

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC  ) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at newsroom.intel.com and blogs.intel.com.

Intel, Atom and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

1 Source: Council on Foreign Relations

2 Source: Chris Fortson, “Women’s Rights Vital for Developing World,” Yale News Daily 2003

Note to Editors: Multimedia is available at: http://newsroom.intel.com/docs/DOC-3079



Intel Corporation
Gail Dundas, 503-816-2382
Gail.dundas@intel.com
Natassia Costa, 415-268-4802
Natassia.Costa@nof9.com

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