The Disappointing Dow Boosts Bonds -- For Now

In 2013, the bond market sank while the Dow soared. Will the opposite prove to be true in 2014?

Jan 8, 2014 at 12:31PM

Although we don't believe in timing the market or panicking over daily movements, we do like to keep an eye on market changes -- just in case they're material to our investing thesis.

So far this year, the performance of the Dow Jones Industrials (DJINDICES:^DJI) has been a big disappointment to bullish investors, with the average down another 68 points just before 12:30 p.m. EST to bring its total decline for 2014 to more than 100 points. But what's been bad for stocks has been good for bonds, as the bond market has largely seen rates stabilize and prices rise modestly in the first week of the new year.

How 2014 has treated bonds
Many investors came into 2014 expecting the rout in the bond market to continue. With the Federal Reserve having begun to reduce its quantitative easing program, bond yields had climbed substantially, hurting bond prices and leading to negative total returns for many bond investors in 2013.

So far this year, though, most niches of the bond market have held up reasonably well:

  • Treasury bonds have held their own, with 10-year yields remaining at roughly the 3% mark. The iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (NYSEMKT:TLT), a benchmark for long-term Treasuries, has risen about half a percent so far on the year.
  • Expectations for inflation have remained subdued, and that has held rates on inflation-adjusted bonds relatively stable as well. The iShares TIPS Bond ETF (NYSEMKT:TIP) has also posted gains of about 0.4% in 2014.
  • Among smaller niches, municipal bonds have seen similar gains, while high-yield corporate bonds have risen a bit less. The SPDR High Yield Bond ETF (NYSEMKT:JNK) has gained 0.2% for the year, while one popular benchmark of muni bonds has risen about half a percent in 2014.

Will the good times last?
Obviously, with only five trading sessions under our belt, it's too early to make any dramatic conclusions about the fate of the bond market in 2014.

Moreover, the mood in the bond market could change as early as this afternoon, when the Federal Reserve releases the minutes of its key December meeting, at which it first reduced the amount of its bond-buying activity from $85 billion monthly to $75 billion. If the minutes give hints about the pace at which the Fed could make future reductions in buying bonds, the impact on the market could be huge. Strong economic data has led many to believe that the Fed could reduce its bond buying all the way to zero by the end of 2014. But if the minutes suggest a more gradual reduction, the greater volume of bond purchases could pull long-term rates back downward somewhat, producing gains for long-term bond investors.

In the long run, the Federal Reserve has made it quite clear that although it's ready to maintain extremely accommodative monetary policies for whatever period is necessary to return the economy to a normal course, it still expects to return to a more standard policy in due time. Sooner or later, that will likely lead to further gains in interest rates, putting bond investors in the uncomfortable situation of waiting for almost inevitable capital losses from holding bonds. Only by preparing for rising rates by using more defensive strategies can you preserve your capital for the bond portion of your overall portfolio.

Don't just count on bonds
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Fool contributor Dan Caplinger has no position in any stocks mentioned. You can follow him on Twitter @DanCaplinger. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

A Financial Plan on an Index Card

Keeping it simple.

Aug 7, 2015 at 11:26AM

Two years ago, University of Chicago professor Harold Pollack wrote his entire financial plan on an index card.

It blew up. People loved the idea. Financial advice is often intentionally complicated. Obscurity lets advisors charge higher fees. But the most important parts are painfully simple. Here's how Pollack put it:

The card came out of chat I had regarding what I view as the financial industry's basic dilemma: The best investment advice fits on an index card. A commenter asked for the actual index card. Although I was originally speaking in metaphor, I grabbed a pen and one of my daughter's note cards, scribbled this out in maybe three minutes, snapped a picture with my iPhone, and the rest was history.

More advisors and investors caught onto the idea and started writing their own financial plans on a single index card.

I love the exercise, because it makes you think about what's important and forces you to be succinct.

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Everything else is details. 

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