Fed Notes Pause in Growth, Continues Stimulus

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that economic growth "paused" in recent months because of temporary factors and reaffirmed its commitment to boost a sluggish U.S. economy by keeping borrowing cheap for the foreseeable future.

The Fed took no new action at its two-day policy meeting. But it stood behind aggressive steps it launched in December to try to reduce unemployment, in a statement released after the meeting.

Last month the Fed said it would keep its key short-term interest rate at a record low at least until unemployment falls below 6.5 percent. The rate is currently 7.8 percent.

And it said it would keep buying $85 billion a month in Treasurys and mortgage bonds to try to keep borrowing costs low and encourage spending.

Earlier in the day, the Commerce Department said the economy shrank at an annual rate of 0.1 percent in Q4 2012 mainly because companies restocked at a slower rate and the government slashed defense spending.

In its statement, the Fed said "economic activity paused in recent months, in large part because of weather-related disruptions and other transitory factors."

Despite the slowdown, the statement noted that hiring continued to expand at a moderate pace, consumer spending and business investment increased and the housing sector showed further improvement. And it said strains in global financial markets have eased somewhat, but cautioned that risks remain.

The Fed's decision to continue its stimulus program was largely expected and had little impact on stock and bond prices.

The statement made no mention of looming government spending cuts that will take effect in March if Congress and President Barack Obama don't reach a deal to avert them.

Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial, suspects the minutes of the meeting, which will be released in three weeks, will reveal deeper concerns about budget fight.

"The Fed is very cognizant about how it characterizes the economy," Swonk said. "They are worried about a self-fulfilling prophecy of talking the economy down too much."

The statement was approved on an 11-1 vote. Esther George, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, cast the lone dissenting vote. George, who is a new voting member, expressed concerns about the risk of higher inflation caused by the Fed's aggressive policies.

In December, the Fed signaled for the first time that it will tie its policies to specific economic barometers. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke made clear during a news conference that even after unemployment falls below 6.5 percent, the Fed might decide that it needs to keep stimulating the economy. Other economic factors will also shape its policy decisions, he said.

The guidance was designed to give consumers, companies and investors a clearer sense of when super-low borrowing costs might start to rise.

The Fed also said it would continue its bond purchases until the job market improved "substantially."

When it buys bonds, the Fed increases its investment portfolio and pumps more money into the financial system -- something critics say could eventually ignite inflation or create dangerous bubbles in assets like real estate or stocks.

On Friday, the government will release its jobs report for January. Unemployment is expected to remain at 7.8 percent. That still-high rate, 3½ years after the Great Recession officially ended, helps explain why the Fed has kept its key short-term rate at a record low near zero since December 2008, just after the financial crisis erupted.

Still, some private economists think the Fed will decide to suspend its bond purchases in the second half of this year. They note that the minutes of the Fed's December meeting revealed a split: Some of the 12 voting members thought the bond purchases would be needed through 2013. Others felt the purchases should be slowed or stopped altogether before year's end.

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  • Report this Comment On January 31, 2013, at 9:23 AM, StopPrintinMoney wrote:

    Of course they understand the stupid stimulus is not working - the Fed's objective is to monetize the govnt debt and to prop the equity markets.

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