Is Cook Better than Jobs for Apple?

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There's no denying that Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL  ) is still feeling the impact of losing Steve Jobs. But shareholders might find that they like Tim Cook just fine in the long run.

There's no doubt that Apple is at the center of technology's largest revolution ever, and that longtime shareholders have been handsomely rewarded with over 1,000% gains. However, there is a debate raging as to whether Apple remains a buy. The Motley Fool's senior technology analyst and managing bureau chief, Eric Bleeker, is prepared to fill you in on both reasons to buy and reasons to sell Apple, and what opportunities are left for the company (and your portfolio) going forward. To get instant access to his latest thinking on Apple, simply click here now.


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  • Report this Comment On April 06, 2013, at 12:31 AM, tkell31 wrote:

    Calling this moronic doesnt go far enough. So Cook is more responsive to shareholders. Thanks for that insight Sherlock.

  • Report this Comment On April 06, 2013, at 10:35 AM, PolicyGuy wrote:

    One of Steve Jobs' most valuable traits was his insistence on excellence. Tim Cook shares this character trait with Jobs. I am confident that this will continue to drive Apple's success in the future. At the same time, Cook is not a true believer in some of the stubborn, somewhat crazy ideas that Jobs had that sometimes held Apple back. The production problems that have plagued the most recent iMac, for example, are a legacy of Jobs' ideological commitment to aesthetic and design principles that go far beyond what is rationally defensible.

    I believe that Cook is also more conscious of the reality that the shareholders own the company. Fortunately, this does not mean that he believes he has to satisfy the demands of every impatient shareholder who thinks that short-term fluctuations in the stock price are what should drive management decisions.

    I think the article is right that Cook is very underrated. I just hope that the company doesn't repeat the mistakes of the past and try to push him out the way that Jobs was pushed out. If that happens, I will not remain a long-term investor in the company.

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