The Future of Natural Gas Transportation

One home-run investing opportunity has been slipping under Wall Street's radar for months. But it won't stay hidden much longer. Forward-thinking energy players such as General Electric and Ford have already plowed sizable amounts of research capital into this little-known stock, because they know it holds the key to the explosive profit power of the coming "no choice fuel revolution." Luckily, there's still time for you to get on board if you act quickly. All the details are inside an exclusive report from The Motley Fool. Click here for the full story!

For some newer avenues that natural gas might find itself headed down, look no further than railway and marine transportation. Already, there has been public buy-in from some of the biggest companies in the United States. Earlier this year, Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-A  ) made it well known that its portfolio company, BNSF, would begin testing the use of liquified natural gas as a substitute for diesel fuel in its locomotives. This could have huge positive implications for the natural gas industry and equally negative effects on the diesel fuel sector.

For more information on these two sectors, as well as Wesport Innovations' (NASDAQ: WPRT  ) foray into the use of natural gas in marine engines, tune in to the following video, where Fool.com contributor Tyler Crowe teams up with analysts Joel South and Taylor Muckerman to give you all of the details.


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  • Report this Comment On June 23, 2013, at 1:08 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    Burning natural gas in a vehicle as a transport fuel is far less efficient than burning natural gas at a utility scale plant that can then deliver the electricity needed to charge the battery of an EV.

    End of story.

  • Report this Comment On June 23, 2013, at 2:46 PM, DickHamilton wrote:

    not end of story, jamesdan. Having a tank of liquified gas in your car is very different when you run out, and have to refill/recharge. Swap out the cylinder, and off you go, or, if they can standardize the couplings in time, couple some fancy nozzle to your car.

    On the other hand, it's nothing new - some people have been trying to encourage LPG use in Europe for decades now, and it hasn't taken. Chicken and egg - why would you get a gas-turbine powered vehicle, if you can't find a refueling station? And why would you invest in refueling stations if hardly anybody has the right kind of vehicle?

  • Report this Comment On June 23, 2013, at 3:14 PM, Itsjustmeagain wrote:

    Dick. Tesla is now stating they will have facilities to swap out discharged batteries for fresh batteries. Five minutes and you're on your way. Where will this new infrastructure be used? Probably the iniatial sites will be I 95 and I 5

  • Report this Comment On June 27, 2013, at 7:37 PM, alt089 wrote:

    LPG use is quite significant in some countries (wiki: autogas). Mainly because of tax incentives making other fuels more expensive on a per BTU basis. Usually those are bi-fuel engines. You can switch between the fuels in drive. With LPG costs about 2 times less than gasoline first stations start to appear. You can retrofit all but advanced direct injection gasoline engines into LPG. The more miles you do the more you save. After some adoption increase regular gas stations start to offer LPG, much later makers offer brand new bi-fuel cars.

    Of course LPG is not natural gas (CNG), it's a by-product of petroleum rafination, but who cares ;)

  • Report this Comment On August 21, 2013, at 12:34 PM, ccd1234 wrote:

    Not a comment. Saw something relating to use of natural gas and diesel fuel. Where can i find it?

    Charles

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