Is "TV Everywhere" a Dream for Investors, or a Nightmare?

The dream of watching TV everywhere is alive and well thanks to the likes of Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL  ) and Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX  ) . And yet, the opportunity also has a dark side, says Fool contributor Tim Beyers in the following video.

Distribution is proving to be uneven. Research from ABI finds that, while a third of U.S. households with cable access are opting for TV everywhere, they most often use tablets or smartphones for streaming. Game consoles don't rate nearly as well, which is bad news for Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT  ) and other console makers. Mr. Softy's Xbox system streams programming for those who need a break from the controller.

Conversely, ABI's findings help to explain why Apple iTunes supports hundreds of thousands of TV and mobile downloads daily. Expect continued growth from both Apple and Netflix in this area. Others, too.

This is a macro trend, Tim says. Every order-of-magnitude improvement in broadband availability should make it easier for new and existing services that support TV everywhere. Even your lonely game console.

What other stocks will profit? The Motley Fool's top experts have created a new free report titled "Will Netflix Own the Future of Television?" The report not only peers into the future of the television business, but also offers top ideas for where you can invest right now. To get your free report, just click here!


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  • Report this Comment On August 16, 2013, at 12:29 AM, grahamsway wrote:

    Great presentation and topic.

    If the "TV everywhere" trend continues to grow, which I agree probably will, it could be incredibly disruptive. It seems, that depending what course it takes, entire industries could be turned on their head.

    Just for a small example, the trend would seem to suggest that small screen sizes such as mobile phones would be a key component. It would seem that consistently viewing 60 min or longer shows such as movies would probably not end up being taken up much in that way. Even the 7 inch or 8 inch tablet would not seem to be conducive to those broadcasts.

    If that's the case, it would seem programming would evolve to shorter 10 minute to 20 minute formats. This would be a huge shift in what would be produced, how it would be produced, how it would be scaled for viewership and how that would be monetized through advertising.

    Certainly some big, big changes and something to watch and consider carefully.

  • Report this Comment On August 16, 2013, at 3:22 PM, VernLori wrote:

    In 1995 I ditched my cable company and opted for satellite service, because the cable programming was bad as was service. Since that time I've been with satellite TV, but just wrote them concerning the trend to fill our TV screens with commercials, most times several in a row, that are stiched together and at times difficult to tell when one commercial ends and the next begins. Commercials are getting to be so numerous that it seems the air time for commercials during a program exceed the program time itself. Then, there is the issue of programming itself. Yes there may be 225 or so channels available via satellite TV, but much of it is old programming or stupid reality shows. If programming quality doesn't improve more viewers may go the way of Net Flix or pay for premium movies that can get costly. I believe that viewing extended programming on a tiny smart phone or tablet will pass as the new wears off. I frequently find myself going to my desktop computer when smart phone emails won't load or the font is so small it is hardly readable without a magnifying glass. TV everywhere may be an option for some, but believe those who want to enjoy a program will view via their large flat screen. Who knows in a few years TVs may utilize the new Graphene technology that can fit on a living room wall.

  • Report this Comment On August 16, 2013, at 11:43 PM, lowmaple wrote:

    If indeed TV everywhere ends up on phones etc the big winners will be optometrists, eyeglass and contact lens makers. Unless the phones project holograms. The idea of all the technolgy to make viewing so much better is wasted on phones or tablets. They'll have to come up with something beter thn that.

  • Report this Comment On August 17, 2013, at 3:13 PM, grahamsway wrote:

    Hi VernLori, I agree with your take on commercials and programming. Unfortunately the trend seems to be migrating toward online.

    As the big names need to increasingly "monetize" their online presence, which seems to only mean add advertising, the screen continually seems to more and more resemble Times Square with all sorts of fancy & moving ads at all parts of the screen.

    I don't use a smartphone or tablet but it bugs me on my computer monitor so I'm guessing it must be worse on smaller devices.

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