Efforts by Zynga (NASDAQ:ZNGA) to reduce its dependence on Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) are taking hold, but not at the rate some investors might hope, Fool contributor Tim Beyers explains in the following video.

According to its latest 10-K filing, Zynga derived 69% of bookings and 75% of revenue from Facebook in 2013. Huge numbers, to be sure, but also down from 2012, when Zynga counted on the social network for 81% of bookings and 86% of revenue.

Impressed? Don't be, Tim says. The ratio is far higher than others who hope to take Zynga's place as a go-to for mobile gaming. Take Kabam, which recently acquired peer Phoenix Age and is aiming for as much as $650 million in 2014 revenue -- an 80% increase, according to TechCrunch.

Games hosted at Facebook and Kabam.com accounted for just 30% of revenue as of this writing. Candy Crush Saga maker King isn't as specific in its disclosures. Instead, the company identifies Facebook and app stores from Apple, Google, and Amazon.com as the source of the majority of its revenue.

Therein lies the problem for Zynga investors. Kabam, King, and others have already figured out how to distance themselves from Facebook while enjoying huge growth. Investors need Zynga to achieve the same soon, or risk watching the company get permanently left behind.

Six ways to find the next Facebook
They said it couldn't be done. But David Gardner has proved them wrong time, and time, and time again with stock returns like 926%, 2,239%, and 4,371%. In fact, just recently one of his favorite stocks became a 100-bagger. And he's ready to do it again. You can uncover his scientific approach to crushing the market and his carefully chosen six picks for ultimate growth instantly, because he's making this premium report free for you today. Click here now for access.

Tim Beyers is a member of the Motley Fool Rule Breakers stock-picking team and the Motley Fool Supernova Odyssey I mission. He owned shares of Apple and Google at the time of publication. Check out Tim's web home and portfolio holdings or connect with him on Google+Tumblr, or Twitter, where he goes by @milehighfool. You can also get his insights delivered directly to your RSS reader.

The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Amazon.com, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Compare Brokers