The Surprising Way Citigroup Inc Topped Bank of America Corp and Wells Fargo & Co

Citigroup (NYSE: C  )  is a bottom-feeder, right? Wrong.

Citigroup has surprisingly outpaced both Bank of America (NYSE: BAC  ) and Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC  ) in one of the simplest, but most important ways to measure profits.

The 1 core number
I'm talking about net interest margin. This is the difference between what a bank is able to earn from loans (remember these are assets for banks) and what it in turn pays out on deposits and other sources of funding (its liabilities).

For example, if a bank only funded itself with deposits on which it paid 0.25% and earned 4.5% on the loans it wrote, it would have an impressive net interest margin of 4.25%. And while movements here won't grab headline attention, Citigroup has had an impressive stretch over the last five quarters compared to its peers.

The glimmer of hope
As shown in the chart below, Citigroup has managed to actually keep its net interest margin stable while both Bank of America and Wells Fargo have seen theirs drop. In fact, Citigroup cut the gap between its NIM and that posted by Wells Fargo in half, from 0.6% to 0.3%:


Source: Company Investor Relations

You may notice both Citigroup and Wells Fargo have seen net interest income -- the actual difference in dollars between what it pays out versus what it earns -- rise. But this is a function of Wells Fargo increasing its average interest earning assets by more than $125 billion over the last year. Citigroup on the other hand has kept its flat, while Bank of America has actually had its decline by a little over $50 billion.

It too should be noted the dip at Bank of America from 2.36% to 2.29% likely doesn't raise any eyebrows, but if it had been able to earn that difference of just 0.07% on its $1.8 trillion in assets, it would've meant an additional $350 million to its bottom line.

The key takeaways
The growth in earning assets at Wells Fargo should certainly be applauded, as one would hope it is able to deploy those into loans for consumers and companies which will benefit both them and its shareholders.

Yet over the last year, it instead has it has nearly doubled its holdings of Federal Funds -- what the Federal Reserve issues -- to nearly $215 billion, which earn just 0.27%. Keep an eye on what it is doing in the future to learn whether or not this growth in assets will too grow its bottom line.

Yet the biggest takeaway from this should be that Citigroup has been able to maintain the stability of one of its most important drivers of profit -- nearly 60% of its revenue is from net interest income -- in the midst of a difficult and falling interest rate environment. Although there may be many questions still surrounding Citigroup, this should be applauded.

The other thing you're missing
While net interest margin doesn't grab headlines, neither does the massive shift coming to banking. In fact, there's a brand-new company that's revolutionizing banking, and is poised to kill the hated traditional brick-and-mortar banks. That's bad for them, but great for investors. And amazingly, despite its rapid growth, this company is still flying under the radar of Wall Street. To learn about about this company, click here to access our new special free report.


Read/Post Comments (3) | Recommend This Article (3)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On April 21, 2014, at 1:15 PM, CeaRay wrote:

    And they still can't move off their lows for the past six years. Call it 4.80 cents or 48.00 after the reverse split 1 for 10 but it still hasn't moved.

    It missed the Fed stress test and Mexicans are stealing more from them then the shareholders make. But the CEO still got his 4 million dollar raise. let see some results that investor would like.

    Citi is dead money and has been for six years.

  • Report this Comment On April 21, 2014, at 1:50 PM, stockmajor wrote:

    True that Citi has been dead money for the past several years, but the question is how much longer that will be the case.

    I think the banks are finally coming around and that now, finally, is the time to buy. Of course, I have been wrong about that concerning C and BAC for the past few years so far.

    Just the same, I intend to maintain my long positions going forward. In fact, I just bought some more calls on both of these banks for JAN 2016.

  • Report this Comment On April 21, 2014, at 5:43 PM, davidscott1 wrote:

    Citigroup has reported consolidated net revenues of $20.12 billion for first quarter FY14, which is a 2.2% fall year over year but 3.7% better than analysts’ estimates of $19.39 billion. http://goo.gl/ybnF5M

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 2920708, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 8/31/2014 12:32:47 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement