Nokia X

Nokia's new X2 is using Android to lure users and boost Microsoft stock. Credit: Nokia.

What should Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) stock investors think of the new Android-powered Nokia X2 smartphone? Guest host Alison Southwick put this question to Fool analysts Nathan Alderman and Tim Beyers in this episode of 1-Up on Wall Street, The Motley Fool's Web show in which we talk about the big-money names behind your favorite movies, toys, video games, comics, and more.

Nathan says Microsoft is acting shrewdly by employing a version of Android that looks like Windows Phone, and which highlights Microsoft apps such as Skype. The strategy is reminiscent of Mr. Softy's historical tendency to "embrace and extend" existing platforms. In this case, the idea is to draw in users who might not otherwise purchase a Windows-powered handset.

What's more, Microsoft gets money for each Android sale. Upwards of $2 billion annually, according to most estimates, which makes Google's mobile operating system one of Mr. Softy's most profitable platforms.

Tim agrees, noting that Microsoft is also on track to introduce a new touch version of Office for Android before the apps go live on Windows 8. The implication? Mr. Softy is going to keep pursuing sales of its key apps and hardware without giving much thought to the underlying platform -- a move that could reward long-term investors.

Now it's your turn to weigh in. Click the video to watch as Alison puts Nathan and Tim on the spot, and then leave a comment below tell us what you think of the X2 and Microsoft stock at current prices. You can also follow us on Twitter for more segments and regular geek news updates!

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Alison Southwick has no position in any stocks mentioned. Nathan Alderman owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway. Tim Beyers owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway and Google (A and C shares). The Motley Fool recommends Berkshire Hathaway and Google (A and C shares) and owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Google (A and C class), and Microsoft. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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