Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) notched another quarter of impressive top-line growth in its Android case, with revenue up 22%, coming in at $16 billion for the quarter. The company is churning a lot of this revenue into future growth, especially in building data centers, acquiring real estate, and adding equipment. With more people switching screens as they consume content -- for instance, starting a movie on their phones, then picking it up on their tablets before finally watching it on the TV -- Google is focused on making the user experience seamless between devices.

Although many outside the company are worried about Google's falling cost per click rate, or the amount advertisers pay for each user who clicks on their ads, this metric dropped only 7% this quarter, while paid clicks were up 33% -- more than enough of a volume increase to outweigh the slightly lower cost per click. Google doesn't break out mobile advertising revenue, but some analysts cite mobile ads as a weakness for the online search behemoth.

In this edition of Stocks on Our Radar, Stock Advisor analyst Sara Hov and Rule Breakers analyst Simon Erickson discuss Google's strengths and weaknesses -- and whether investors should buy today. 

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Sara Hov owns shares of Google (A shares) and Google (C shares). The Motley Fool recommends Google (A shares) and Google (C shares). The Motley Fool owns shares of Google (A shares) and Google (C shares). Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.