These 9 Countries Have No Corporate Tax

The nine countries offer the allure of paying nothing in corporate taxes. Find out what countries these are and how corporations and you can benefit from these tax havens.

Jul 12, 2014 at 8:32AM

The United States may represent the pinnacle of financial excellence around the globe with the largest GDP, the most renowned stock market, and arguably the greatest economic clout of any country, but it also has a corporate tax rate that would cause just about any multinational based here to quake in its boots.

Within the United States, corporations face a peak marginal corporate tax rate of 40%. By comparison, the global average corporate tax rate is just 23.6%, and it's declined each year since 2006, when it was 27.5%.


Understandably this doesn't mean that all businesses are paying 40%, as there an ample number of deductions that can be used to offset their profits. Clinical-stage biotechnology companies, for instance, can carry forward their losses and use them against future earnings (should one or more of their clinical programs succeed) in order to keep their effective tax rate near 0%. Likewise, Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) has been able to deduct stock options given to its employees against its profits. In 2012, Facebook earned more than $1 billion in profits but wound up receiving a $295 million refund check from the IRS! It actually could be a while before Facebook pays more in taxes than you. 

However, Facebook's case isn't the norm, and comparably speaking the U.S. corporate tax rate is the second highest in the world, behind only the United Arab Emirates at 55%. Relative to all other industrial nations, the U.S. corporate tax acts as a possible red flag for foreign investment dollars and can even push U.S. companies overseas.


Source:, Flickr.

Known as corporate tax inversion, U.S. companies agree to purchase a company in an ex-U.S. country and then relocate their headquarters to that country with the hope of lowering their corporate tax rate. Take AbbVie's (NYSE:ABBV) pursuit of Irish-based Shire (NASDAQ:SHPG) as a perfect example. Although AbbVie's takeover offers point to a number of product synergies and cost savings with Shire, this deal is really all about lowering AbbVie's peak corporate tax rate from 40% in the U.S. to Ireland's peak rate of just 12.5%. This would result in literally hundreds of millions in annual tax savings for the combined entity.

9 countries with no corporate tax
Although Ireland might appear to be the king of the crop when it comes to low corporate tax rates, there are nine countries around the globe that have absolutely no corporate tax, according to data from KPMG.

These nine countries are:

  • Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bermuda
  • Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba
  • Cayman Islands
  • Guernsey
  • Isle of Man
  • Jersey
  • Vanuatu

Grand Cayman. Source: Ricymar Photography, Flickr.

While these small getaways might appear to be too good to be true, there are ways these countries generate revenue from corporations that call them home.

In the Bahamas, corporations are subject to property taxes that are often pretty high, considering that it's a prime destination for well-to-do retirees. In addition, businesses pay Social Security wages for their employees as well as a number of other indirect taxes and fees such as business license fees, registration duties, and import duties. Let's be clear that a corporations' effective taxes in the Bahamas are likely to be significantly lower than in the U.S., but they're not exactly zero, either.

The Cayman Islands, another popular tax haven, has even fewer taxes than the Bahamas, with corporations paying duties on imported goods as well as a stamp duty on transferred Cayman Islands real estate. The effective tax rate that Cayman Islands-based multinational corporations typically report (often in the low double-digit percent range) is merely taxes paid in foreign countries by their subsidiary.

Knowing this can make you a smarter investor
Why does this matter? Understanding where a stock holding in your portfolio is based could mean millions or even billions in possible tax savings. Corporations based overseas could potentially be more attractive takeover targets than those in the states. Additionally, those businesses operating overseas that are able to keep more of their profits could potentially return part or all of these savings in the form of a dividend, share buyback, or a combination of the two, to shareholders.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs, Flickr.

While the location of a company's headquarters shouldn't be a primary factor that tips the scales on whether to invest in an ex-U.S.-based company, investors should also keep in mind that one prominent risk remains. The U.S. and other EU nations are cracking down on tax haven abuse and could potentially turn to using sanctions against these countries to reduce corporate tax evasion. Were this to happen, the benefits of incorporating in these countries could be lost. I would suggest we're still a long way off from seeing this happen, but it's a scenario worth keeping in the back of your mind.

Even you can take advantage of this little-known tax "loophole"
Recent tax increases have affected nearly every American taxpayer. But with the right planning, you can take steps to take control of your taxes and potentially even lower your tax bill. In our brand-new special report "The IRS Is Daring You to Make This Investment Now!," you'll learn about the simple strategy to take advantage of a little-known IRS rule. Don't miss out on advice that could help you cut taxes for decades to come. Click here to learn more.

Sean Williams has no material interest in any companies mentioned in this article. You can follow him on CAPS under the screen name TMFUltraLong, track every pick he makes under the screen name TrackUltraLong, and check him out on Twitter, where he goes by the handle @TMFUltraLong.

The Motley Fool owns shares of, and recommends Facebook. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

4 in 5 Americans Are Ignoring Buffett's Warning

Don't be one of them.

Jun 12, 2015 at 5:01PM

Admitting fear is difficult.

So you can imagine how shocked I was to find out Warren Buffett recently told a select number of investors about the cutting-edge technology that's keeping him awake at night.

This past May, The Motley Fool sent 8 of its best stock analysts to Omaha, Nebraska to attend the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting. CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger fielded questions for nearly 6 hours.
The catch was: Attendees weren't allowed to record any of it. No audio. No video. 

Our team of analysts wrote down every single word Buffett and Munger uttered. Over 16,000 words. But only two words stood out to me as I read the detailed transcript of the event: "Real threat."

That's how Buffett responded when asked about this emerging market that is already expected to be worth more than $2 trillion in the U.S. alone. Google has already put some of its best engineers behind the technology powering this trend. 

The amazing thing is, while Buffett may be nervous, the rest of us can invest in this new industry BEFORE the old money realizes what hit them.

KPMG advises we're "on the cusp of revolutionary change" coming much "sooner than you think."

Even one legendary MIT professor had to recant his position that the technology was "beyond the capability of computer science." (He recently confessed to The Wall Street Journal that he's now a believer and amazed "how quickly this technology caught on.")

Yet according to one J.D. Power and Associates survey, only 1 in 5 Americans are even interested in this technology, much less ready to invest in it. Needless to say, you haven't missed your window of opportunity. 

Think about how many amazing technologies you've watched soar to new heights while you kick yourself thinking, "I knew about that technology before everyone was talking about it, but I just sat on my hands." 

Don't let that happen again. This time, it should be your family telling you, "I can't believe you knew about and invested in that technology so early on."

That's why I hope you take just a few minutes to access the exclusive research our team of analysts has put together on this industry and the one stock positioned to capitalize on this major shift.

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David Hanson owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway and American Express. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Google, and Coca-Cola.We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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