Mark Lin

Mark Lin

asiavalue

Mark is a private value investor and is the author of CheapskateInvesting.com website which uses a systematic quantitative screening approach to filter the global stock markets for cheap cigar-butts and wide-moat compounders.

Recent articles



Why Shares of Omega Protein Skyrocketed

The shareholders of Omega Protein must be laughing all the way to the bank after seeing the company's share price outperform the market over the past year. If you missed the boat, should you get in now?






3 Stocks That Can Grow Without Raising Capital

A company with negative working capital is an attractive business, with suppliers funding a large portion of capital that most growing businesses need, resulting in high returns and strong growth.


Don't Close the Door on These 2 Building Products Companies

Don't make the mistake of judging a company by the industry it belongs to. While making building products isn't hardly the most attractive business, two companies have caught my attention because of their unique characteristics.



Did TreeHouse Foods Make the Right Acquisitions?

Acquisitions can make or break a company. Accretive acquisitions done for the right reasons can create significant long-term shareholder value; the converse is equally true. Which category will TreeHouse Foods' recent deals fall into?



Which of These 2 Outdoor Advertising Firms Should You Invest In?

You may have read fewer newspapers and seen a lower number of print advertisements in the past few years. In contrast with the demise of print media advertising, outdoor advertising is still growing and remains a popular advertising medium.


2 Reasons Why Murphy USA Is a Convenient Investment Choice

It's getting increasingly difficult to pick a retailer with true competitive advantages. Murphy USA is one exception to the rule, having achieved double-digit return on capital ratios for the past five years.



Who Will Win the Tug-of-War Between Amazon and Book Publishers?

Amazon can win in the short term by extracting higher margins from publishers, but might suffer in the long run as publishers seek other alternatives. In the book industry Barnes & Noble and Scholastic Corporation have been overlooked.