Post of the Day
February 5, 1998

From our AOL Boston Market Board


Subject: Store Location
Author: WardStar

There is an old maxim in retail sales; " LOCATION< LOCATION< LOCATION< ! " I have noticed in my journeys, mostly limited to the South East, the BOST outlets are poorly located for competition with other fast food chains. Normally you get a clustering effect of like stores. For example, if you see a McDonald's, the master at store location and site selection, you will surely notice a Burger King, Taco Bell, etc., lurking nearby. This clustering not only creates competition between stores, but a synergistic effect. Everyone knows where the fast food is. So when people go out looking to get a Big Mac, maybe they'll see the Boston Market and decide to go there instead. Clustering really helps bring in the new clients.

Unforntunately, I tend to see BOST stores in stand alone locations, and this is bad for business development and sales. Anyone else notice this ? In fact, as a rule it seems chicken places generally fail to go neck to neck with burger places, though I am seeing KFC nudging some new locations in clusters.

Another problem with BOST is its advertising strategy. I have heard from friends that it is really very good food at BOST, but its advertising gives an upscale, mature image, which leads one to think of the food as being a little higher priced with a more sit down and enjoy and a less grab and go aura.

A lot of business at MCD and Burger King is derived from children, hence all the toys, meal deals, expensive indoor playgrounds, etc. Parents often are tired of forcing their kids to eat. So to make life easier, they pack up to crumb munchers and head off to a fast food joint. They know the kids will be happy there, and it will not eat into next month's mortgage or car payment. As an added benefit to the food chain, the kids eat there early and often, and going to MCD for fast food becomes an established life pattern, one in which they in turn will pass on to their kids.

BOST does not give the image that it is either inexpensive or a kid friendly place. If I am going to hear my kid bitch and moan about dinner and end up forcing her to eat it, I do not want to pay for the priviledge of the experience.

I would like to hear comments on my comments, and ask if they are valid. If so, this has nothing to do with corporate structure, but rather strategy and execution on a marketing level.

Best Wishes and hang in there !

Jim Ward

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Response

Subject: Re: Store Location
Author: LGC100

Area Developers probably picked the cheaper locations to save money. Land in cluster areas is usually more expensive. They also may have chosen to disassociate BOST from typical fast food burger joints. I have no problem going a few extra miles for a better product.

Recently we bought a couple of Kid's Meals from BOST (meat loaf and chicken) and our 5-year old loved it while the 3-year old was not as enthusiastic. One negative: BOST doesn't offer toys with the meals. In any event, we didn't have to force them to eat the food. Even though they love fries, they also like mashed potatoes, and we know which is healthier.

I would like to see more bread choices, and a couple more drink selections added to the great BOST menu.

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Response

Subject: Re: Store Location
Author: Niceguy32m

I agree the Bost stores seem to be stand alone. But I have no problem getting to one, there locations are in high traffic areas although not in cluster fast food areas. I don't see this as a problem. I know I want Bost and not McD or BK or Taco Bell before I go out for lunch or dinner. I am single and can't think of a healthier homestyle meal. I also don't have any problem with the pricing, I'm willing to pay more for the quality. I think there are alot of people in the same boat as me and Bost seems to attract this target market which is a big untapped population.

Bill


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