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Copart, Inc. (NASDAQ:CPRT)
Q2 2019 Earnings Conference Call
February 21, 2019, 11:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good day, everyone, and welcome to the Copart, Inc. Second Quarter Fiscal 2019 Earnings Call. Just a reminder, today's conference is being recorded.

For opening remarks and introductions, I would like to turn the call over to Mr. Jay Adair, Chief Executive Officer of Copart, Inc. Please go ahead, sir.

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you. Good morning, everyone, and welcome to the second quarter call for Copart. On the call with me today is Jeff Liaw, CFO; and Will Franklin, Executive Vice President. I'm going to turn it over to Jeff Liaw for opening comments, and then Will Franklin will give us an update on operations and then we'll be happy to answer any questions that we have at that time.

All right. Thanks so much. Jeff?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Thanks, Jay. I'll start with safe harbor. During today's call, we'll discuss certain non-GAAP measures, including non-GAAP net income per diluted share, which includes adjustments to reverse the effects of disposals of nonoperating assets, foreign-currency-related gains and losses, the impact of income taxes on the deemed repatriation of foreign earnings, net of deferred tax changes, and certain income tax benefits related to accounting for stock option exercises.

We've provided a reconciliation of these non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measures on our website under the Investor Relations link and in our press release issued yesterday afternoon. We believe the presentation of these non-GAAP measures, together with our corresponding GAAP measures, is relevant in assessing Copart's business trends and financial performance. We analyze our results on both the GAAP and non-GAAP basis described above.

In addition, this call contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of federal securities laws, which are subject to substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or implied by our statements and comments. We do not undertake to update any forward-looking statements that may be made from time-to-time on our behalf. For a more complete discussion of the risks that could affect our business, please review the management's discussion and analysis portions in our related periodic reports filed with the SEC.

Now, I'll turn our attention to the second quarter of our Fiscal 2019. We're pleased with our operating results. Also, I'll start with a reminder that the first six months of Fiscal '18 were distorted by Hurricane Harvey. Over those first two quarters of 2018, we incurred losses of nearly $10 million on an operating basis. Q2, in isolation, would reflect a gain because the first quarter of 2018 would disproportionately capture storm related costs while the second quarter would disproportionately capture storm related revenue. We'll -- I'll make it a point over the course of his call to communicate our key metrics with and without the effects of Hurricane Harvey.

We achieved a record second quarter in revenue, gross profits, and operating income, starting with our nominal global revenue growth of 5.6%, with an unfavorable year-over-year currency effect of $4.9 million from foreign operations, primarily due to the relative strength of the dollar in comparison to the pound and the Brazilian real.

Excluding the effect of Hurricane Harvey, our revenue growth was 17% even. Our global service revenue growth was 3.7% year-over-year, and again, excluding Hurricane Harvey, was 13.7%. We typically suggest looking to service revenue and service revenue growth as the more accurate indicator of underlying business activity. Our purchased car growth of 19.1% year-over-year, driven largely by our international businesses, split approximately equally between the U.K. and Germany. A quick reminder that our Copart owned inventory remains relatively small at $28.3 million at quarter end, which is small in the context, of course, of the overall business.

Turning to unit sales, our nominal global units declined slightly at 0.6% year-over-year, with a slight U.S. unit decline of 3.7% and international unit growth of 18.7%. Again, excluding Hurricane Harvey, our global unit sales grew at 7.7%. U.S. units grew 5.7%. And, excluding Harvey and charities volumes from that U.S. number, our volumes grew 7.5% year-over-year . Our U.S. unit growth was driven by both our insurance and noninsurance segments, which Will will describe in greater detail in a few minutes.

Then, turning to inventory, our nominal global inventory grew at 6.6% year-over-year. Excluding the effect of Hurricane Harvey, our inventory grew at 7.7%. For the quarter, our gross profits grew 8.7% year-over-year, excluding Harvey. That same number would be 13.6% year-over-year growth. Our gross margin rate increased from 41.7% a year ago to 42.9% this year. So, approximately a 120-basis point lift. Excluding the effect of Harvey, our gross margin compressed slightly, approximately 1%, which can be explained almost entirely by the slight mix shift to purchase car revenue.

Our average selling process for vehicles at Copart auctions in the United States, excluding Hurricane Harvey, grew 16.1% year-over-year. This -- pardon me -- 15.4% year-over-year. That compares to 16.1% growth a year ago. So, 15.4% this year and 16.1% a year ago for the same quarter. Will, again, will provide more context on this phenomenon, a reflection both of the type of cars that are consigned to Copart as well as the expansion and marketing efforts that we pursue with our Copart member base.

Turning to our general and administrative expenses, excluding stock compensation and depreciation, were up from $29.7 million a year ago to $33.2 million this year. We're down $1.6 million sequentially versus the first quarter of 2019. Repeating a mantra that you've heard before, in general, G&A expenditures will vary from quarter to quarter and will grow over time with inflation and complexity. We continue to believe we can achieve operating leverage, given the topline growth we've experienced

Our GAAP operating income growth was 9.1% for the quarter. Excluding Hurricane Harvey, that same operating income would've grown at 15.5%. Our net interest expense, you can see, is down slightly year-over-year given our lower average net debt balance. Our other income of $4.8 million is largely a gain on the sale of an asset, specifically a now-replaced data center. You also see that adjusted out in our non-GAAP reconciliation.

Our second quarter income tax rate was 20.4%, a reflection of the lower U.S. federal tax rate that we've discussed on prior calls, as well as one-time benefits from stock option exercises, which we again reflect in the non-GAAP presentation. Our GAAP net income increased from $103.3 million a year ago to $131.4 million this year, for the second quarter, an increase of 27.2% year-over-year. On a non-GAAP basis, our net income grew 11.5% year-over-year. Excluding the effects of Hurricane Harvey and including an assumption for tax rates, that same growth rate would be 18% plus or minus for non-GAAP net income year-over-year.

The non-GAAP schedule -- we've already talked about the major adjustments on that page for the second quarter for this year, which include both the disposal of nonoperating assets as well as the excess tax deduction for stock option exercises. I'll just quickly remind folks that the major adjustment for last year, for the second quarter, was the $10 million adjustment of the one-time transition tax charge that's a reflection of the tax reform assent in that quarter.

I'll turn out attention briefly to Germany before coming back, then, to the balance sheet and cash flow. I would encourage folks, for further background, to review the transcript of our first quarter earnings call, where we described in much greater detail the nature of the market and our efforts there. It represented a one-time deep dive, so to speak, into the business. But, as a quick substantive update, we now have 12 locations up and running in pursuit of critical physical footprint across the country.

At Copart Germany, we're now running daily auctions across those locations, but the strong majority of our volume sold to buyers outside of Germany. We think that reflects the power of the Copart brand name, our buyer network, and technology platform, and it frankly is a strong testament to the inefficiency of the current market model for total losses in Germany. Our unit sales in Copart Germany are approximately 8x the same volume for a year ago for the second quarter.

We also continue to demonstrate our ability to purchase cars through Wreck Online, a listing service that we own, and to sell them at a positive margin at Copart Germany auctions. As you know, we also continue our dialogue in parallel with insurance carriers in Germany, and believe that a Copart model akin to what we have in the U.S. and the U.K. is ultimately the right answer for that market as well, for a host of reasons, including both total loss and claims costs for carriers as well as the claims experience policyholders.

Turning to the balance sheet and the cash flow statement, our operating cash flow for the quarter, gross CapEx is $74.4 million. About 60% of the CapEx was attributable to capacity expansion and lease buyouts, with the balance attributable to maintenance and other activities. We also purchases 7.6 million shares of Copart stock in the open market at a weighted average price just below $48.00, for total outlays of approximately $365 million. We funded these purchases with cash on hand and a revolver draw of $93 million as [audio cuts out] at the end of the quarter. We still available liquidity of more than $750 million.

With that, I'll turn the call over to EVP Will Franklin.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Thank you, Jeff. Let me provide a few comments about our operational performance for the second quarter. Copart, once again, delivered another strong quarter. Our U.S. volume, when adjusted for the Harvey activity in the same quarter last year, grew by 5.7%.

Our volume growth continued to be driven by organic growth and market wins within the insurance market and our continued expansion into the noninsurance markets. Organic growth in the salvage market is driven, we believe, by an increase in total loss frequency as high repair costs and our elevated auction returns are leading to a higher percentage of claims resulting in an economic total loss. The growth in our auction returns has significantly outpaced the growth in used car values.

Using January 2017 as a baseline, the Manheim Used Car Index has grown 8.4%. Using the same baseline, ASPs we are generating at our U.S. auctions for only insurance cars has grown by 35%. While the rest of the industry is quickly moving toward the digital remarketing convention, we have been completely digital since 2003 when we introduced our BB2 platform. We have continually improved our auction platform, now BB3, over the last 16 years, and is commonly recognized as the standard in the industry.

The efficiency of BB3, and our elevated marketing focus on international buyers, have led to a significant growth in bidding activities from those buyers. Our full U.S. website is now translated into seven languages. In addition, we have elements of our website that accommodate languages native to 135 countries. And currently, we sell from the U.S. into 147 countries.

In the quarter, 38.4% of all U.S. units sold were to international buyers, and 46.9% of the value of the units sold were to international buyers. In total, over 70% of all the vehicles sold on our U.S. website received at least one bid from an international buyer.

Our marketing efforts have two goals -- to bring more buyers to our auction, and to get those who attend to place more bids. We have been successful in both efforts. The number of unique bidders was up 13% and the number of bids received per lot sold was up 8%. Breaking down the growth in unique bidders further, we saw an 11% increase in domestic bidders and a 22% increase in the international unique bidders.

The growth in our ASPs has been the primary driver in a 6.4% increase in the U.S. revenue per car. Also contributing to that growth are the additional services we're providing to both the buyers and the sellers. The noninsurance markets continue to be a focus of growth in our U.S. strategy. These markets include franchised independent dealers, finance and leasing companies, fleets, charities, equipment dealers, and wholesalers. Excluding the charity and municipality markets in the U.S., our noninsurance volume grew by almost 20%, and by more than 100% over the same quarter last year and the same quarter two years ago respectively.

The growth in volume was spread broadly across multiple seller segments. Volume from dealers was up 14%, finance companies 24%, wholesalers 24%, rental car companies 62%, and fleets and industrial equipment were up 41%. We have successfully grown our noninsurance volumes as we developed better systems integration into fleets, banks, and dealerships as we had developed sales and operational programs targeting individual segments, and as we continue to increase the auction returns that we're delivering to our noninsurance sellers.

Turning to the U.K., we delivered another very strong quarter as we saw growth in volume of 11.8%. In local currency, revenue and EBIT grew by 21.7% and 23% respectively. The growth in volume came from increases in both the insurance business, driven once again by market wins and organic growth, and growth in our noninsurance business as we grew our U.K. dealer volumes.

We also continue to see meaningful growth in both Brazil and Canada as the value we offer in terms of technology, processes, land, and people has allowed us to expand our market share in those countries. In Canada, we increased our volumes in our local currency revenue by 8.4% and 21.5% respectively. In Brazil, our growth was even more remarkable, increasing our volume and our local currency revenue by 22% and 36.5% respectively.

Jeff has already provided commentary on Germany. With that, we note that our operations outside of the Americas, the U.K., and Germany for the quarter remained immaterial in both revenue and EBIT. Globally, we are seeing rising labor, health insurance, and cellphone costs, all of which have led to an increase in our average cost to process each car.

Our inventory was up in the U.S., internationally, and worldwide by 5.9%, 11.1%, and 6.6% respectively. When adjusted for Harvey, the growth in the U.S., internationally, and worldwide was 7.2%, 11.1%, and 7.7% respectively. The year-over-year growth in our U.S. inventory over the prior eight quarters has averaged over 9%, and we expect this trend to continue. To accommodate this growth, and to provide stand-alone capacity along the Gulf of Mexica and the East Coast, we have engaged in a massive capacity expansion initiative. In the last three weeks alone, we have announced new yards at Harleyville, South Carolina, serving the Charleston area; Antelope, California, serving the North Bay and Sacramento areas; and Mocksville, North Carolina, serving the Charlotte area. In total, these three yards added over 114 acres of capacity. So far, this fiscal year, we have announced 14 new facilities -- four in the U.S., one each in Brazil and Canada, and eight in Germany.

Currently, in the U.S., we have 17 expansion projects in the construction phase and 29 projects in the engineering phase. These 46 projects alone represent thousands of acres of capacity and will

...

That concludes my comments. Todd, I'll turn the call back over to you for the Q&A session.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. If you would like to ask a question, please signal by pressing *1 on your telephone keypad. If you are using a speakerphone, please make sure your mute function is turned off to allow your signal to reach our equipment. Again, press *1 to ask a question. We'll pause for just a moment to allow everyone an opportunity to signal for questions. We'll take our first question will come from Bob Labick of CJS Securities.

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

Good morning. Thanks for taking my question.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Hi, Bob.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Hi, Bob.

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

Hi. I want to -- a couple real quick questions on Germany, and then one on the noninsurance growth, which was very impressive, that you just talked about. Starting with Germany, obviously over the last, I guess, 6-12 months, you've really accelerated your pace of rollout in your growth there. Can you talk about -- what has surprised you the most over the last 6-12 months during this acceleration phase?

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

I think the biggest surprise was just how well the team performed in terms of opening up so many yards so quickly. When we got there this summer, and started looking at changing our strategy in terms of what would make us the most successful, we realized we needed a network. And that's what's worked for us in the U.S., and the U.K., and other markets -- Brazil, Canada -- is we have a stronger network. We have a better -- an easier ability to pick up cars quickly and provide our services, and really just the team's performance and ability to do that is probably the most surprising thing.

Second, I'd say, is just the amount of buyers that we've been able to bring in. Once we started to hold auctions -- and we're auctioning well over 500 cars a week now -- once we started that process and had regular auctions available to the members, the marketing team's just done a really great job on getting our brand out there and cultivating buyers for our auctions. So, it's been very positive. We've talked about it in the past. I like Jeff's comments, which are let's -- let us succeed and perform and then we'll report on those results. But we're very happy with what we see in Germany.

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

Okay. Great. And I know you want to succeed and perform first, but I just wanted one more question and then I'll move off it. I know you talked about, potentially over the next several quarters, flipping an insurance company to the U.S. style. Do you still believe that's possible or likely? And if that doesn't happen over the next couple of quarters, what would be the reason that it wouldn't happen?

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, I do think it's going to happen. The reason it will happen is associated with friction that you have today with the process. So, you're requiring the insured to hold the vehicle and then have some buyer come to their house and pick the vehicle up. And there isn't an insurance company that I have met in Germany yet that isn't concerned with customer service and net promoter scores and giving the best possible brand experience that they can give. And obviously, when we send a uniformed driver in and pick the vehicle up, bring it to our location, and then auction it, and the end buyer's picking up at our location, you don't have that touch with the buyer and the insured.

And that can be a negative. There can be a number of scenarios that I could outline for you where the buyer ends up wanting to have a conversation with the insured about the salvage. And clearly, there's not an insurance company that wants that. The second reason is return. We're able to buy cars, as Jeff as mentioned on previous calls -- we're able to buy calls basically through the platforms and then bring them over to our yards and auction them off and get a higher return. And that is just very, very simple. You're allowing buyers from around the country and the world to bid on product that they know they're going to get. There's no contingency. There's no question. If they bid, they're going to own it.

Whereas, when they bid on the platforms, there's a less than 10% chance of knowing you're going to get the vehicle. Even if they're high bidder, they may not get the vehicle because the insured may sell it somewhere else, through a body shop or through some other -- through the dealership rather than to the buyer. So, you're taking away that element of unknown and making it a sure -- a guarantee that you're going to get the vehicle. And then, you have the logistical component. And we said this before, it should not be underestimated. When a buyer has to -- when a buyer bids on something and has to pick it up and go to three different locations, three different insureds homes, and pick that vehicle up within a certain amount of timeframe, that adds a degree of difficulty.

When a buyer can bid on three different Copart locations and buy a half a dozen or a dozen vehicles so the can get a lot more product, and then they can take three weeks to pick it up, as opposed to having to get it out within four days, that's just a better experience for the buyer as well. So, I just -- I don't have any doubt at this point that we're going to see continued traction in that market.

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

Great. That was really helpful color. Thank you. And then, just one last quick one -- obviously, you just discussed very impressive growth of noninsurance from dealers, finance, wholesalers, rental cars, etc. Who were the primary buyers of these? Are these the new unique bidders coming online? Or just talk a little bit about the buyer base there, how it may be different than your core, or if it is exactly the same.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

No, Bob. I think the profile of our buyer base changes constantly based on the product that we're offering. And you're seeing buyers that have an appetite for these different types of cars, and even heavy equipment that we're offering -- and that's the -- that just demonstrates the efficiency of our auction platform. We easily get to those buyers. Those buyers easily get to us and are able to view these cars.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Bob, I'd just add to that that I think both are true. So, we expand as the nature of the cars that we offer evolves. Our buyer base expands further as well. But it's also true that the existing buyer base is thirsty for the kind of cars that are offered by the dealer consigners. Otherwise, by the way, they wouldn't consign through us. As much as we'd like to say we're fantastic or independent dealers and so forth, they vote with their feet and they vote as a reflection of the auction prices they achieve at Copart auctions. So, I think it's a testament to the power of that buyer network that they're doing quite well and bringing more cars to Copart over the time. I think that also has a virtuous cyclical affect as well because then those newer, or less damaged, or nondamaged, cars then bring further buyers into the network as well. So, I think it's a marketplace that continues to expand on both sides -- buyers and sellers.

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

Great. Thanks very much.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Thanks, Bob.

Operator

Thank you. We'll take our next question from Craig Kennison of Baird.

Craig R. Kennison -- Robert W. Baird & Co. -- Analyst

Thank you for taking my questions. Will, I wanted to start with you on the noninsurance business -- continue to see great growth there. Can you provide examples of systems integration tools that you're using to drive your noninsurance volumes with dealers, fleet operators, or rental companies?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Sure. I mean, each of these segments tend to migrate to different platforms for their system operations. For example, the finance companies use a system called AutoIMS. The dealers use Dealertrack or DealerSocket -- a number of those other systems. The buyers seem to come to us from AuctionACCESS. And it's extremely important for us to write the integrations that are needed to reduce any friction that is caused by operating the two different systems -- our system and theirs. And we have a significant initiative along the lines of creating those integrations. And that's just part of it. It's not just the systems. It's the processes.

For example, heavy equipment -- transportation of a piece of heavy equipment could cost $4,000-5,000 as opposed to well under $100.00 for an insurance company. The titling process for charities, where you got to pick up the title when you pick up the car, is completely different than the titling processes for dealerships. Dealers are much more concerned and in need of after auction services, like counterbidding -- and I can go on and on. Finance companies have rules that surround repossessions, even voluntary repossessions, with which we have to provide special documentation and compliance. And so, it's just not a matter of being integrated into their software systems. It's being able to change our processes to accommodate their specific needs.

Craig R. Kennison -- Robert W. Baird & Co. -- Analyst

That helps. And then, to what extent is the growth fueled by new customers trying your services versus customers that you've already landed that are dramatically increasing the use of your service?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

It's both. We're seeing organic growth. We're seeing people -- customers that we've had for years that we're contacting again. We're, like I said, eliminating the friction -- whether it's systematic or process -- encouraging them to send us cars. And the returns that they are receiving have driven more and more volume. It's not one big thing. It's a combination of a lot of little things that we're doing internally.

Craig R. Kennison -- Robert W. Baird & Co. -- Analyst

Got it. And then, I also wanted to ask about the total loss rate trend in the U.S. and in Europe. Where do you think that loss rate is headed in 2019 and beyond? And then, when you look at Europe, do you have any data to frame where the total loss rate is today and where that may be headed?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Craig, I'll comment on the first of your question as per total loss rate. I think this is, as you know, the one way tailwind behind the business for the last 40 years, right? That the cars, once they're in accidents, are evermore prone to being totaled than repaired. I think that's an unassailable macro factor that's really hard to read on a micro basis. So, trying to forecast that quarter-to-quarter, even year-to-year, is tough. We do think the overwhelming forces at work here will drive it upwards over time. There's no particular ceiling that we have in mind. So, I don't have a good point in time forecast for you for 2019.

As for Europe, I think the data -- we haven't seen a comprehensive data source that's quite as exhaustive as CCC here in the U.S., so don't have a comparable number to share with you. The U.K., as you know, is very different from Germany, for example, even at how they practice -- or how they handle total losses. But no, we don't have any point estimates as precise as the major sources we have here in the U.S.

Craig R. Kennison -- Robert W. Baird & Co. -- Analyst

Got it. Hey, thank you.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Thanks, Craig.

Operator

Thank you. We'll take our next question from Bret Jordan of Jefferies.

Bret D. Jordan -- Jefferies, LLC -- Analyst

Hey, good morning, guys.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Bret.

Bret D. Jordan -- Jefferies, LLC -- Analyst

On the purchase car trend in Germany, is it possible to get the agency volumes up without flipping the insurance companies, in the sense that, if the individual's still selling the car, once you have enough auction traffic, will they send you the car on consignment as opposed to you having to buy it?

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Right now, we're acquiring cars so we can hold auctions. So, we're doing that through the platform. We do have some noninsurance volume coming in now, as well. So, we're starting to process vehicles for companies that service the insurance industry as well as rental car companies. But currently, the strategy is to illustrate the benefits to the large insurers and then have them switch over to our model.

Bret D. Jordan -- Jefferies, LLC -- Analyst

Okay. Great. And then, on Will's comments around the real estate pipeline, could you put -- maybe some timeframe around hose thousands of acres? Is that going to be a very large near-term acquisition of real estate, or is that 46 projects over a period of years?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

I think years is too long. I think within 24 months the vast majority of all those 47 projects should be delivered.

Bret D. Jordan -- Jefferies, LLC -- Analyst

Okay, great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. We'll take our next question from Gary Prestopino of Barrington Research.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Hey, good morning, everyone. Hey, Will, when you talked about the noninsurance, did you give the percentage breakdown of what percentage of vehicles were noninsurance this quarter versus last year? Or can you give that?

Operator

Hello?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Yeah, we're still waiting to get that. Do you have any other questions while they gather that information?

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Oh, certainly I do. In terms of the gross margin on the purchase vehicles, it was -- sequentially, it was down a couple hundred basis points. Is that just an impact of more growth in Germany, or is that currency, or what?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

It is a reflection, in part, of growth in Germany. It is largely not currency, because currency would affect both sides of that ledger, Gary, right, because of the buy-ins.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Right. Okay.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

It's partially Germany. It's partially also that purchase car banks can affect this as well. So, as the -- if the prices, for example, can rise for certain purchase cars -- we talked about this before. But the more a car bought and sold for, the lower [audio cuts out] dollar spread grows [audio cuts out] do not expect on a $10,000 car to make double the profit you would on a $5,000 purchase car, for what it's worth.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Okay. And then, lastly, I wanted to ask about the vehicle pooling cost. They were -- year-over-year they were up pretty dramatically. What would account for that?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

That's largely an effect of the accounting change, Gary. So, it -- to make a long story short, the -- anyway, check the second quarter transcript. I think you'll find pretty robust discussion there of how the accounting now forces us to push more revenue -- we used to pull more revenue forward. Now, we push more back, which hangs more of it on the balance sheet, which is -- and the corresponding costs, which is why BPC is up so dramatically.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Yeah, OK. That would explain it. And them, lastly, Jeff, I got on the call late. I actually got hooked into the wrong call. Could you give me some of those unit volume numbers that you generally address at the beginning of the call -- or unit volume changes, or whatever?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Yeah, I'll give you the big ones. So, unit sales -- nominal unit sales climbed 0.6%, U.S. unit declined 3.7%, international growth of 18.7. Excluding Hurricane Harvey, global unit sales growth of 7.7, U.S. unit growth of 5.7, ex-Harvey and ex-charities we said in the U.S. we said was 7.5%.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Okay. Thank you.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Gary, I got that number for you on the percentage of non-insurance vehicles sold last quarter. In the U.S., it was 22.9%. In the same quarter last year, it was 20.8%.

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Okay. Thank you.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. We'll take our next question from Chris Bottiglieri of Wolfe Research.

Chris Bottiglieri -- Wolfe Research, LLC -- Analyst

Thanks for taking the question. I was hoping you could disaggregate the increased average selling prices. I would think some of it's mixed. Is there a way to maybe just look at what the ASPs have done, just for the insurance segment?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

You're right. A portion of it is mixed, and we don't -- we haven't separated the impact -- the change in mix versus the increase in ASPs solely for insurance companies. So, I'm not sure we can provide that to you on the call.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

I think Will did provide the stats on Manheim on a two-year basis, and U.S. insurance only being up 35%.

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Right. But not the impact it has on revenue.

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

Right, not the impact on revenue. But the point is that ASPs are up, and up significantly year over year, including for the insurance segment in isolation. So, it's not just mix shift. It is also significant increases in insurance ASPs in the United States.

Chris Bottiglieri -- Wolfe Research, LLC -- Analyst

Gotcha. That's what I'm trying to arrive at. So, when you think about what's deriving this, is there any metrics you can cite in terms of the total loss rates? Are you seeing that total loss rates are increasing even more for younger vehicles than for older vehicles, or anything you can demonstrate -- use to demonstrate that there's a younger vehicle being totaled today than historically?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

I think the themes you've heard us talk about on the last few calls all still hold true, which is that we are seeing on average slightly newer cars being totaled. So, if we look at the model year of the car we sell, we are selling more newer cars than -- today than we were a year ago, and that's been true for a while. We are also selling less damaged cars, so the cars are totaling more easily. We have certain metrics to -- the insurance companies do, rather, and they provide them to us, regarding repair estimates. So, how much is the repair estimate relative to the intact value of the car? And we are seeing, by that particular barometer, less damaged cars entering our system over time.

On the flipside of this, is all the bidding phenomenon that Will described. So, I think we are seeing newer and less damaged cars on the supply side. And on the demand side, you are seeing more international buyers -- more buyers period, by the way, domestic and international -- but also diversified and global buyer base for our cars. So, it's both of those things working in concert that has driven selling prices up.

Chris Bottiglieri -- Wolfe Research, LLC -- Analyst

Gotcha. And just lastly, there, I mean, the total loss rates have been pretty amazing, and it sounds like you're still looking for that 7-9% volume growth. Do you have any data on accident frequency? What are you seeing there? Are accidents still down year-over-year? Do you think some of this collision avoidance technology is yet impacting accident frequency, or do you think it's still too far off?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

We probably don't have any better data than you do, so we follow third-party sources like the FastTrack data and so forth. And what I'd say first is that, for the vast majority of this company's history, accident frequency has declined slightly -- steadily, but very slightly -- over time and it's been dwarfed by, of course, total loss frequency on the other side of the equation. So, that has driven organic unit volumes up very meaningfully over time. I do think that the rapid increases in accident frequency we saw from 2011/2012-2106 have tapered. So, accident frequency may be declining somewhat -- maybe flat. But it's not rising at the rate that it had previously -- total loss frequency, as far as we can tell, continues its upward trend.

Chris Bottiglieri -- Wolfe Research, LLC -- Analyst

Yeah, so that's helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. We'll take our next question from Daniel Imbro with Stephens Inc.

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Yep. Hey, good morning, guys. Thanks for taking my questions. Industry growth in Germany -- I think you mentioned, Jeff, you guys are at 12 locations. As a footprint, is that a sufficient network to service the country today? And how is the salvage industry in that market growing? Obviously, you guys are growing rapidly, taking share. But is the market also growing high single digits similar to the U.S.?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

So, as for the footprint, I think the -- this is sufficient for us to participate actively in Germany. There's no doubt in my mind that, over time, as we penetrate the market to grow our platform, we will invest dramatically more still in landing capacity there. So, the 12 is a good spread geographically across the country. But in terms of sufficiency of capacity, we are still in the very early innings of our participation in Germany. Your second question, again, was, Derek (sic)?

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Just on industry growth in Germany. Is it similar to the U.S., in that high single-digit range?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

That's a tricky question to answer. So, even your point about our taking shares is a very nuanced concept in the sense that we are taking share from what is a very different traditional salvage model, through the listing service, etc., which I'm sure you heard and can review again from the second quarter call. But in a nutshell, I don't think the underlying characteristics should be different from the U.S. and the U.K. in the sense that the cars are relatively old across the system. So, Germany is a mature economy that has had cars for a long time. So, the average fleet age, likewise, is old, in comparison, by the way, to developing markets or to economies that have grown tremendously in the last decade or two -- China, and India, and the like -- where the cars are relatively new by comparison.

So, the cars are old. The cars are expensive to repair, meaning labor costs are high, parts costs are high, regulatory burdens are also meaningful -- meaning you have to restore airbags back to intact condition to drive cars. All of those same underlying forces are similar in Germany, but for like-for-like salvage auction statistics in Germany, we don't have them because they don't exist, right? We are the first ones to attempt to deploy the Copart model, so to speak, in Germany.

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Fair. Thanks. Will, I think you mentioned that over 30% of U.S. vehicles are now going abroad. And I'm assuming that some of those vehicles are going over to Europe. So, can you talk about the buyer base in Germany to the extent -- I would just love to hear your thoughts around -- over time, as you develop the German market and the further EU market, does that cannibalize any of the international demand that you're seeing at your U.S. auctions today?

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

No, it really doesn't. Most of our international activity is in the less developed countries. Most of our cars provide affordable transportation, and our top three are Mexico, which is obvious because of its proximity to the United States. The next two are the UAE and to Nigeria. And we're also seeing significant growth in the Caucasus countries. There is some cross pollination in our buyers in Germany, but it's not significant in its scope. And we don't think it'll have a cannibalization impact on our international activity as Germany develops.

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Okay, great. And then, last one for me -- just on capital allocation, you guys obviously chose to deploy capital toward share repo on the quarter, and you funded it with some short-term debt. Understanding you don't want to comment on any future activity, but has your appetite culturally to maybe carry more leverage on the business changed today, given some of the scale you've seen -- you gained in the recent years?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

No, I don't think there's been a philosophical shift at Copart, if you go back just a few years, even. At the end of 2014, we had leverage on the balance sheet for share repurchases we consummated in the summer and -- summer of 2015 and December 2015. So, we had a little bit more leverage then, even than we do now. But no, there's no philosophical shift in how we think about leverage. We generally prefer to be -- to have meaningful financial flexibility, which gives us strategic flexibility when it comes to acquiring land, pursuing international growth and so forth. So, we'll continue to be a relatively low leverage institution.

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Got it. Thanks so much, guys.

Operator

Thank you. Again, if you would like to ask a question, please press *1 now. We'll take our next question from Derek Glynn of Consumer Edge Research.

Derek Glynn -- Consumer Edge Research LLC -- Analyst

Thank you for taking my question. As you think about additional growth opportunities outside of North America or Europe, China and India stand out as potentially two large markets in the long run. Can you provide an update on how you view those opportunities and whether investments have been made to expand there?

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

I think you captured the thought well, in that they are very promising markets long term. But for a host of reasons, the markets haven't yet materialized to nearly the same extent that they have in Europe and the United States. So, we'll be there when it emerges, but it's not in the next -- not on the next couple of years anyway.

Derek Glynn -- Consumer Edge Research LLC -- Analyst

Okay. Understood. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. This concludes our question-and-answer session. I'll turn it back to management for closing remarks.

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you. Thank you, for coming on the call, and we look forward to reporting on the next call on Q2. Thanks again. Bye-bye.

...

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your participation. This concludes today's conference. Have a great rest of your day.

Duration: 46 minutes

Call participants:

A Jayson Adair -- Chief Executive Officer

Jeffrey Liaw -- Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President of Finance

William E. Franklin -- Executive Vice President, U.S. Operations & Shared Services

Craig R. Kennison -- Robert W. Baird & Co. -- Analyst

Daniel Imbro -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Chris Bottiglieri -- Wolfe Research, LLC -- Analyst

Gary F. Prestopino -- Barrington Research Associates, Inc.

Derek Glynn -- Consumer Edge Research LLC -- Analyst

Bret D. Jordan -- Jefferies, LLC -- Analyst

Robert James Labick -- CJS Securities, Inc. -- Analyst

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