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OneMain Holdings, inc (NYSE:OMF)
Q2 2021 Earnings Call
Jul 22, 2021, 9:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by. Today's conference is scheduled to begin momentarily. Until that time you going be placed on music hold. Thank you. Welcome to OneMain Financial Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Conference Call and Webcast. Hosting the call today from OneMain is Peter Poillon, Head of Investor Relations. [Operator Instructions] It is now my pleasure to turn the floor over to Peter Poillon, you may begin.

Peter Poillon -- Head of Investor Relations

Thank you, Nicole. Good morning everyone and thank you for joining us let me begin by directing you to pages 2 and 3 of the Second Quarter 2021 Investor presentation, which contains important disclosures concerning forward-looking statements and the use of non-GAAP measures. The presentation can be found in the Investor Relations section of our website. Our discussion today will contain certain forward-looking statements reflecting management's current beliefs about the company's future, financial performance and business prospects. And these forward-looking statements are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties and speak only as of today. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements are set forth in our earnings press release and include the effects of the COVID 19 pandemic on our business for our customers and the economy in general. We caution you not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. If you may be listening to this via replay at some point after today, we remind you that the remarks made herein are as of today, July 22 and have not been updated subsequent to this call. Our call this morning will include formal remarks from Doug Shulman, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Micah Conrad, our Chief Financial Officer. After the conclusion of our formal remarks, we will conduct a question-and-answer session. Now let me turn the call over to Doug.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Thanks Peter, and good morning everyone. We appreciate you joining us today, we'll spend the majority of our time on today's call covering our second quarter performance, but I will also spend time discussing some of the strategic initiatives underway that will allow us to continue to realize our mission of improving the financial well-being of hard working Americans. Our second quarter performance demonstrates the resilience of our business model as we saw strong loan originations in the latter half of the quarter, resulting in notable growth in receivables as well as record low losses. Capital generation was strong in the quarter and we remain well positioned for continued growth as the economic recovery continues. In the quarter we generated $310 million of capital 98 million more than the prior year up 46%. C&I adjusted earnings for the quarter were $2.66 per share.

Our credit performance remains very strong and continues to benefit from the proactive credit tightening actions that we implemented at the start of the pandemic, the unprecedented levels of government support over the past 15 months and our robust underwriting capabilities. Second quarter losses were 4.4% and we feel confident about the continuation of this excellent credit performance over the remainder of this year. Receivables, which we refer to as managed receivables in our presentation, grew 3% year-over-year and 4% sequentially. It's worth highlighting the growth in our loan book was higher than the overall near prime installment loan market, which declined about 3% year-over-year. We believe our strong performance in comparison to the market is driven by our growth initiatives, including our continued product innovation, new channels and advanced analytics across multiple functions within the company. Recall that in early 2020, as the pandemic began we committed to working closely with our customers to help them through a difficult time, but we also said we would continue to stay focused on our longer-term initiatives that would position us for growth as the pandemic waned and the economy strengthened. We are now starting to see positive results from many of those initiatives. The economic and business trends we observed in the quarter were positive.

Unemployment rates and jobless claims have started to normalize and after a year of economic uncertainty driven by pandemic restrictions, a recession and multiple government stimulus packages, we are now seeing consumer demand pick up. Recent Fed data shows personal consumption is up sharply since the start of the year. Importantly, demand for our product has rebounded to pre-pandemic levels. We saw originations improved each month of the quarter with June activity resulting in a record high for the company. With that said, we will closely monitor economic conditions, including the potential for resurgence of COVID associated with new variants.

The recent strong economic backdrop is positive for our current suite of products. But also for the products, we expect to offer customers in the near future. Let me elaborate a bit on that. If you turn to slide 7 of the presentation, I'd like to touch on the future vision that we discussed on this call. Last quarter, because it is guiding our priorities and the actions we are taking at OneMain. Our vision is to be the lender of choice to near-prime consumers, meeting their current needs when they have a mismatch between income and saving on the one hand and expenses on the other, while also providing products and services that help customers progress to a more promising financial future. We will leverage our foundational strength to continue to be the leader in near prime instalment lending, but we are also expanding our suite of products, services and experiences to deepen our customer relationships, increase engagement and enhance our proprietary dataset, all of which will provide real value to customers and make it more likely that they will want to do business with us in the future.

Over the past few quarters, we've discussed our plans to extend our product offering with the roll out of a differentiated digitally enabled credit card, designed specifically for the near prime consumer. I'm pleased to say that we remain on target to be in market later this year with the initial tests beginning in the next several months. As with our other product rollouts, we will be deliberate and run a pilot before our full rollout. The pilot will test uptake, line usage and credit before scaling receivables in the latter part of 2022 with the expectation that our credit card will be a multi-billion dollar receivables product over the coming years. Once we get through the initial launch in testing, in addition to scaling the credit card, we also anticipate further expanding our lending products to include a hybrid product, which will combine characteristics of both card and loan solutions to provide even more financial flexibility for qualified customers. We are really excited about the future of our product set and the value that it will provide to customers. We also closed on the acquisition of Trim during the quarter. We are now in the integration process and look forward to offering the multitude of Trim solutions to our current loan customers as we continue to focus on our mission of improving the financial well-being of hard working Americans.

Finally, as I mentioned earlier, the significant investments we are making in technology, new channels, new products and digital capabilities, continue to have a positive impact on our results. There is no doubt that the growth in receivables we reported this quarter would not have occurred without our innovations and product size in pricing as well as our expanded digital channels. Before I turn the call over to Micah, I'd like to briefly comment on capital deployment. Consistent with our previously established framework of considering and enhance dividend each first and third quarter and recognizing the strength and resilience of our business, we announced a 3rd quarter enhance dividend of $3.50 per share, which combined with our regular quarterly dividend of $0.70 per share returns $4.20 per share to shareholders this quarter. In addition, as we discussed on our last call, we commenced a programmatic share repurchase program and bought back 612,000 shares for a total of $35 million during the second quarter. Using our capital allocation framework as a guide, we will continue to invest in loans that provide value to our customers and meet our risk return criteria, invest in the business to position us for the future and return capital to shareholders. With that, let me turn the call over to Micah, to take you through the financial details of the second quarter.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks Doug and good morning everyone. We had another great quarter as consumer demand returned to pre-pandemic levels, resulting in healthy receivables growth both year-over-year and sequentially. In the second quarter, credit performance continued to exceed our expectations while interest expense also declined. The improving economic outlook gives us confidence in the future performance of our portfolio and allowed us to further reduce loan loss reserve coverage. We are in $350 million of net income or $2.60 per diluted share in the quarter. That compares to $89 million or $0.66 per diluted share in the second quarter of last year, which was impacted by COVID related reserve builds. On an adjusted C&I basis, we are in $58 million or $2.66 per diluted share. That compares to $107 million or $0.80 per diluted share in the second quarter of 2020. Capital generation or C&I adjusted earnings, excluding the impact of changes in loan loss reserves was $10 million in the second quarter, up $98 million or 46% over prior year. As Doug mentioned earlier, we've included in our materials a new metric called managed receivables. This represents the ending balances of C&I loan receivables that we hold on our books plus those receivables we've sold as part of our loan sale program that began earlier this year. We believe this is an important and relevant metric as it encompasses the full balance of C&I loans that have been originated by and our service by OneMain. And it's receivables for the quarter were $18.3 billion up $705 million from the first quarter and up 3% from a year ago, reflecting a strong rebound in consumer demand and the accelerating impact of our growth and efficiency initiatives.

We will continue to report the balance sheet equivalents of ending net receivables and average net receivables, both of which exclude loans that have been sold and are important for loan loss reserves, charge-off rate, yield and other income statement metrics. And keep in mind for all prior-year comparisons, manage and adding receivables are one of the same as the whole loan sale program started in the first quarter of this year. Interest income was $1.1 billion in the second quarter. Largely flat to prior year as slightly lower average net receivables was partially offset by higher yield. Interest expense was $230 million, down $36 million or 14% versus the prior year as we continue to benefit from the ongoing liability management actions that we're taking to reduce our cost of funds while also extending our maturities. Reiterating the guidance that we provided on our last call, we expect full year interest expense in the range of 5% to 5.2%.

Other revenue, was $148 million in the second quarter, up 3% compared to the prior year quarter. Other revenue in the current period included $11 million of gain on sale revenue from the $120 million of loans we sold during the quarter. Policyholder benefits and claims expense was $48 million in the second quarter, down $42 million year-over-year. In the second quarter of 2020, claims expense was significantly elevated at $90 million as we experienced a high level of involuntary unemployment insurance claims during the peak of the pandemic. IUI claims have consistently moderated since that time in the current quarter expense has trended back to normalized levels as anticipated. Let's turn to Slide 9 to review our originations and receivable trends. We originated $3.8 billion in the second quarter up 87% from second quarter, 2020. Importantly, our originations this period were essentially flat to the comparable pre-pandemic quarter of 2019. Originations improved meaningfully each month as the quarter progressed as the impacts of government stimulus program subsided and economic conditions continued to improve. In fact our June 2021 originations reached an all time high at nearly $5 billion and we've seen good momentum continue into July.

Slide 10 lays out how originations measured against comparable periods of 2019 trended throughout the second quarter. The bar graphs provide the actual originations, while the percentages below each of the bars shows the growth percentage adjusted for differences in the number of business days in each respective period. So for example, you can see that while May originations were down on a dollar basis from 2019, when adjusting for business days, May was actually percent better than 2019. June performance then improve further and ended 10% higher than 2019 levels. Assuming the current economic environment continues, we expect to grow our receivables by 8% to 10% in 2021. We expect receivables at December 31, will include about $350 million of receivables sold but service by OneMain for our whole loan sale partners.

Let's now turn to slide 11 and walk through our recent credit trends. Our credit performance continues to be strong as the adjustments we made last year, combined with multiple rounds of government stimulus and improving economic conditions have all had a very positive effect on delinquency and losses over recent quarters. Second quarter net charge-offs were 4.4% at 192 basis point improvement year-over-year and a 26 basis point improvement over last quarter. After an historic low for 30 to 89-day delinquency in the first quarter, second quarter rose seasonally to 1.76% up a modest 13 basis points against the previous record low set in second quarter of last year. Following the strong 30 to 89 performance from last quarter. Our 90 plus delinquency hit a record low of 13.6% in the second quarter, down 53 basis points year-over-year.

The delinquency levels achieved over the past two quarters give us confidence that we'll continue to see strong net charge-off performance through the remainder of the year. While there continues to be some level of uncertainty in the macro environment, we feel great about the outlook for credit and we now expect full year 2021 net charge-offs of about 4.2%, a significant improvement from our expectations at the beginning of the year. Our loan loss reserve trends are shown on slide 12. We ended the first quarter with just under $2.1 billion of reserves and a reserve ratio of 11.8%. In the second quarter you can see that we reduced our reserves by $64 million. The net reduction reflected an increase of $58 million associated with our growth in the quarter and $122 million reduction from the expected performance of our portfolio under improving macroeconomic conditions. This brought our reserves to $2.0 billion and our ratio to 11.1% at the end of second quarter. So 40 basis points higher than the pre-pandemic level of 10.7%.

Turning to slide 13, second quarter operating expense was $332 million, 12% higher than the comparable prior-year quarter and 7.5% of average receivables. The year-over-year expense growth in the quarter reflects continued investment in new products and growth initiatives. The year-over-year increase in production as well as the difficult comparison again, second quarter 2020 operating expenses, which benefited from the cost actions we took in response to the emergence of the pandemic. We expect that our continued investment in the business combined with strong loan demand will result in our operating expenses growing in the upper end of the 5% to 7% range we discussed on our last call, but recall this is after our OpEx declined 3% in 2020. I think it's important to point out that even with accelerating investment and growth in receivables of $1.3 billion since 2Q-19 our OpEx ratio remains below the comparable period in 2019. This reflects the operating leverage of our model and the efficiency actions we continue to drive across the business.

Let's now move on to the balance sheet on slide 14. We continue to maintain significant sources of liquidity with $1.6 billion of available cash, $7.3 billion in undrawn conduit capacity and $9.7 billion of unencumbered receivables. We had a busy funding quarter raising $1.7 billion. In May, we issued an $850 million 5-year revolving ABS deal with what we believe was a very impressive cost of funds of 1.56%. In June we completed a $750 million 6-year social bond, which was affirmed by S&P to be aligned with social bond principles. Net proceeds of the bond will finance loans to individuals residing in credit-insecure or credit-at -risk counties as defined by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and at least 75% of which will be allocated to minorities and women. We are all very proud of this issuance as is emblematic of how we serve all hardworking Americans.

As I mentioned earlier, we also completed $120 million of whole loan sales during the quarter and we expect this level of loan sales to continue in future quarters. Our mature funding programs remain a hallmark of OneMain and we believe they stand out as a clear competitive advantage for us. We continue to deliver on our capital allocation framework, which includes delivering portfolio growth at attractive returns. Investing in our business and our future and returning considerable capital to our shareholders. Consistent with this framework we announced enhanced dividend of $3.50 per share. In addition to our $0.70 per share regular quarterly dividend. On Slide 17, we've laid out our consistently strong dividend history, including the $4.20 per share dividend to be paid in August, we will have paid out $9.30 per share during the last 12 months, equating to a yield of approximately 16%. In the quarter, we also repurchased over 600,000 shares of our stock for a total of $35 million. As of June 30th, we had $120 million remaining under our current authorization. We continue to execute on our disciplined capital allocation framework, while maintaining our leverage ratio. Our net leverage at the end of the second quarter was 4.5 times comfortably in the low end of our strategic range.

In closing, let's move to slide 19 where we provide some updated financial strategic priorities for full year 2021. We expect the yield on our average net receivables to remain stable at approximately 24% for the full year. We expect our interest expense to range between to obtain 5% and 5.2% of average net receivables. As I mentioned earlier, our loss experience in 2021 has been quite strong and we expect full year net charge-offs will be approximately 4.2%. We expect operating expenses to come in at the high end of our 5% to 7% year-over-year growth range. And lastly, assuming a continued positive economic backdrop, we expect our receivables to grow 8% to 10% this year. With that, I'll turn the call back to Doug.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Thanks Micah. The resiliency and strength of our business model is now showing through as the market stabilizes and consumer demand picks up. We are pleased that the technology and operational enhancements that we made to digitize our business before the pandemic allowed us to continuously provide outstanding service to our customers throughout this unprecedented period and we will continue to meet our customers where they want to be met, providing service in whatever channel they choose, in person on the phone or through digital interactions. We are committed to continuing to invest in our business to ensure we can meet customer needs and to provide the financial products and solutions to help our customers improve their financial well-being. I'd also like to mention our inaugural social bond that Micah discussed earlier. I was incredibly pleased by the strong demand we saw for this bond as the market validated the efforts we've made across our entire organization to ensure that hardworking Americans from underserved communities have access to the financial solutions they need. I'm proud of OneMain strong record of supporting our customers and I'm committed to continuously advancing these efforts.

The strategic initiatives and innovations we have executed over the past several years are continuing to pay off as many parts of the economy have reopened and consumer demand has picked up. And we believe that the investment in our business which we accelerated in 2020 and into 2021 will position us for growth in the years to come. Thank you for joining us today and we're happy to take your questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Is now open for questions at this time. [Operator Instructions] Our first question will come from the line of Michael Kaye with Wells Fargo.

Michael Kaye -- Wells Fargo -- Wall Street Analyst

Hi, good morning. Thanks for taking my questions. With the uptick in inflation I was wondering what's your view on the impacts of the business for example, how should we think about the potential impact from a loan growth, operating expense, debt cost on a consumer credit perspective.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Hey, good morning Michael, it's Micah. Thanks for the question. It's a good one I think. As we think about inflation with respect to originations could be marginally positive things cost a little bit more than the cost in the past. I think you hit on the other -- the other big piece of this which is potentially rising rates. I'll remind you, less than 5% of our debt is floating. So we feel like we're in a pretty good position with respect to that. We have a long maturity structure, we've been really opportunistically replacing a lot of our higher cost debt that's in our stack with lower-cost debt from the very recent really strong markets and base rates have been great, but I think the strength of our programs and our credit spreads have also been a contributor. We issue anywhere from $3 to $4 billion a year which is not a huge portion of our close to $18 billion of debt. So to the extent there is rate increases we think it will be -- it will be sort of ratable over time but hopefully offset with our continued strong credit spreads. I think those are the two biggest basis.

Michael Kaye -- Wells Fargo -- Wall Street Analyst

Okay. Now great. I wanted to ask about the IRS trial tax credit dollars. How should we think about how it impacts your loan growth? I mean is this more like a Goldilocks scenario where isn't too bad given your average it $8,000 average ticket. But it's big enough to be helpful core credit?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think that sounds right Michael. I mean this is in some ways a some of this is an acceleration of credit and also the credit was increase from $2,000 to $3,000 or $3,600 depending on the age of the child. It only affects maybe about 30% of all filers, but we view it as -- it's an incremental monthly amount that I'm sure will be helpful to consumers. But in the grand scheme of things, I don't think it's meaningful enough for it to impact our business or our originations in that way.

Michael Kaye -- Wells Fargo -- Wall Street Analyst

Okay, thank you very much.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question will come from the line of Kevin Barker with Piper Sandler.

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

Good morning, thanks for taking my questions. You had given the tighter underwriting 2020 and how strong the consumer has been with the amount of cash and savings rates there. Do you expect to have structurally lower net charge-off rates as we go into 2022? Just given the back book should start to look better? Just given the tightening underwriting that we saw?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I mean the losses we're experiencing today Kevin are certainly well below normal for our business with our second quarter charge-offs were 192 basis points below the prior year level. We don't think the losses will stay this low forever, but we do expect them to up -- to be below normal for some time. I mean if you look at our early delinquency trends of 30 day nine is a good indicator for that they remain well below about 40 basis points in the quarter below 2019 2Q-19 levels. And I think consumer balance sheets have continued to be strong, average credit card debt is down about 25% from a year ago. Applicants that are coming into our business their revolving debt to annual income is down about 30% or 40% from a year ago. So I think with the strong consumer balance sheets, we should expect to see very strong credit going forward. That said, credit has been certainly influenced by several rounds of government stimulus. So as we saw in 2020 -- 2020 we do expect to see it migration up toward 2019 trends, I think it's just going to happen over time versus -- versus a cliff.

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

Okay and then earlier today there was a comment about one company that's-- consumer lender that was not releasing as much reserves as it had previously or versus peers and they cited the exploration of foreclosure moratoriums and forbearance programs that could impact credit in the back half this June or early 2022. Do you anticipate any impact from the expiration of these government programs just given the outsized in fact they had over the last year to 18 months?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, we're not, we don't see this as a big risk with our customer base, we're monitoring our payment trends very closely and they remain strong. Even into July and I would remind you also as a precaution in our underwriting since 22 -- really about 2Q-20 we've been adjusting for forbearance in both our risk scoring and our ability to pay underwriting, so meaning we would -- if the loan was in forbearance on the consumer bureau, we would have treated that as an expense for our underwriting and so we don't expect that to impact us materially.

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

Okay, thank you for taking my questions.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question will come from the line of John Hetcht with Jefferies.

John Hetcht -- Jefferies -- Managing Director

Morning, guys. Thanks very much for taking my questions.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

[Indecipherable] here.

John Hetcht -- Jefferies -- Managing Director

Yes. The first one is just because a couple of credit card companies have reported I guess we're seeing the early stages of demand recovery across the board but you guys are back to full throttle and I'm wondering -- do you think it's a structural -- is it something structural part of the product or is it that you're gaining product or is it that you're gaining market share. Do you guys have any thoughts as to why you've rebounded in terms of demand trends relative to other consumer finance products?

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, look, we if you look at June, we've had it -- we had an upward trend through the quarter. In June, our originations were up about 10% and we're measuring things against 2019 because we think that's a more normalized way to measure it, because in June 2020 there is a lot of things going on with the pandemic. Demand was actually flat so the demand for our product was the same in 2019 as it was in 2021 in June. We attribute a lot of our growth to the initiatives that we started building toward in '18 and '19 and that we accelerated in '20 and '21 so innovations around our loan size, innovations around pricing and competitive channels, our digital customer experience which gives people options of how to interact with a lot less fall off through the pipeline because we've enhanced the customer experience, when you're on our website the clarity of of our offering. And then there's a whole lot of small but important operational changes that we've talked about before. Routing algorithms, using machine learning to get any applicant routed to either the right branch or centralized call center, propensity models about which calls to be making first as people come in and then we've continually improved our model. So I do think our product is different than a credit card. So they're going to have different trends, but even within instalment loans in near prime year-over-year our balances are up 4% while the market is down 3% and so we do think we're picking up some market share because we've really been focused on our customer.

John Hetcht -- Jefferies -- Managing Director

Okay. Thank you for the comprehensive answer. The second question is just a little bit of liability management. Micah, what do you think -- is there a long-term I guess goal of the mix of secured versus unsecured debt or is that a dynamic kind of decision based on rates and spreads.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. We've always had a little bit of a range of the -- I mean, we've always said, John, that we like to be 50-50. And I think that's just signals really that we want a nice mix of the two -- the ABS markets are deep they tend to be lower cost. We did an issuance this quarter as you heard on our prepared remarks that was below 1.6% certainly very attractive cost of funds. We also, though, like the longer-term duration and tenor of the unsecured market, which gives us the ability to really manage our liquidity runway. So the two are sort of beneficial in different ways and we just seek a balance. We've been actually running more toward the 42%-43% of our debt in the secured category, ABS deals, as you know, do amortize as well, so those sort of naturally amortized down and we have to replace them with new issuance where the unsecured are more bullets. But I would say there is no -- there is no magic to it other than we like to have the balance of the two and we also have very chunky issuance where we're doing some are at $50 to a billion dollars sometimes in the debt market try to move around from quarter to this quarter depending on where we are.

John Hetcht -- Jefferies -- Managing Director

Okay, thanks guys.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question will come from the line of Mark DeVries with Barclays.

Mark Devries -- Barclays -- Senior Research Analyst

Yeah, thanks. Could you give us an indication if you've seen it so far what the trends are for loan growth in July are you continuing to kind of build on the momentum from June and is there anything to call out from a product perspective on whether some of the new initiatives are contributing to that acceleration.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Yeah look, July remains strong similar to June. We don't anticipate seeing the kind of acceleration we saw April through June going forward but at least the beginning of July is strong. Assuming there is -- the economic reopening continues and there is not some major shock with the Delta variant, we think loan growth is going to be strong for the remainder of the year. I don't think anything particular to call out with product. We had talked about, we did have a product that -- we rolled out close to a year ago that offered people a smaller dollar loan. Now it's not a small dollar loan it's $2500, $3,000 for people who didn't qualify for an $8,000 loan but could meet those payments and that's been a very good product. People have then -- as their credits grown some people have taken out larger loans after that and we're very excited our credit card is going to -- the pilots are going to launch very soon. And so we think that's going to be a great product in the market. Our trim product, which is really now value added way for customers to save money on bills we're integrating that and in the first quarter we anticipate offering that to current customers after we have a fully integrated onto our app. So I think good continuation of the product innovations and a lot of things coming over the next year.

Mark Devries -- Barclays -- Senior Research Analyst

Okay, great. And could you talk about how you look to size the loan sale program every quarter? And then I think there is clearly an arbitrage in the capital markets between what the [Indecipherable] income investors are willing to pay for those loans and what equity investors are paying for the cash flows. So obviously, sales and share repurchases look pretty attractive here but just how are you thinking about weighing those factors?

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, in terms of the loan sales, the whole until program markets in that you're asking about the -- we don't necessarily size that differently in any given quarter. These are programmatic relationships and we look at it is obviously an enhancement to our existing funding programs, our loan sale agreements, our two-year flow agreements. So there is a commitment to buy a certain amount of loans over a two-year period that obviously is liquidity and longer-term funding for us and so those agreements are in place and the counterparty on the other side will buy the same amount every month at the agreed upon price. So I wouldn't say we're trying to change those from quarter quarter in terms of the levels we're selling.

Mark Devries -- Barclays -- Senior Research Analyst

Okay. Are you looking to add partners here or you kind of at the level you want to be at.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I mean, I think we've said in the past I'll say it again that we're committed to keeping the vast majority of our loan production on our balance sheet. You heard about our very much successful quarter in the funding markets with unsecured social bond and also ABS at very attractive rates. We do remain open to additional loan sale agreements at the right terms, and I'll leave it at that.

Mark Devries -- Barclays -- Senior Research Analyst

Okay. A total thank you.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question will come from the line of Maurer [Indecipherable] with Credit Suisse.

Claude Maurer -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Great, thanks and laughs [Phonetic] I guess I was thinking about asking a similar question to Micah. I think that you know when we look at it you've generated tremendous amount of excess capital from just the core operations of the company and so perhaps there isn't as much of a quote unquote need to generate more by loan sales, but I guess maybe just to reask the question, have you looked at that relationship where-- whereby the fixed income markets are paying a double-digit premium for your loans and perhaps could be higher if expanded and not necessarily lower? I guess and how you think [Indecipherable]

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think Maurer for us this is all about balance within our balance sheet and also within our funding program. So certainly, the pricing has been very accretive but again I think we want to maintain a certain level on our balance sheet that we feel we're comfortable with. Certainly those returns are there, we think about the price in terms of what happens if we keep the loan, what does that look like and what happens if we sell the loan and obviously in these loan sales they're also very very capital efficient source of earnings. But I think we'd like it as an addition to our already existing funding programs and not sort of a new strategy for the company at size.

Claude Maurer -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Got you. Okay, thank you. That's very helpful. You talked a little bit about kind of funding opportunities and obviously the bond that you just did and spreadsheets have really, really good. Are there any other ways to kind of accelerate -- take in more of the low rate environment into the cost of funds?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Well, there's a few maturities out there in the near future that are of a coupon that's higher than what we're able to raise debt out today. If you look at our entire staff -- our coupon on our unsecured bonds are little bit over 6% and the yield on those -- on that stack is just under 3%. So there is obviously some room there as you think about those those bonds rolling off and new bonds coming on. Obviously, the market is a very dynamic and will change but coming up in the near term, we've got a 22 bond in May that's at a six and an eight. So that's certainly above where we can issue today. So we're thinking about that bond and there is a bond we issued in the -- when the capital markets were in a little bit of a challenge state back in early last year and that will come callable, it's a nice part of what we added over the last 3 bonds we added the callable feature to our programs and so that gives us the ability to do this liability management a little bit more effectively and that bond becomes callable in next May and it's an 8.25 coupon. So I think that's the way we're going to think about it is replacing that higher cost debt with what we hope will be continued strong yields in the new issue market.

Claude Maurer -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Great, thanks so much.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Rick Shane with JP Morgan.

Rick Shane -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Hi guys, thanks for taking my questions. I'd like to sort of combine a couple of observations. Micah you mentioned that the reserve rate is still 40 basis points above day one levels. Kevin Barker made the observation about the change in underwriting over the last year. Given the short nature of your assets. So there has been so much churn. Should we actually consider the possibility that over the next year the reserve rate goes below day one levels because of the shift in the portfolio and the economic outlook?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Rick thanks. Great question. I mean, certainly one we think about and I think the short answer to your question is, yes it's possible. I think it's too early to sort of offer much more of a concrete view on that. One of the things with our reserves you'll remember as [Indecipherable] is you have to incorporate unemployment assumptions for the lifetime of the losses that you're forecasting. The unemployment rates right now in terms of the forecast are still above what they were when we struck these reserves at 10.7% rate post implementation of Cecil. We continue to take a prudent approach with our reserves. If you look at our loss performance and delinquency and roll rates. We've seen some things over the last year plus that I don't think any of us would have expected to see even in our recoveries. You think about post charge-off recoveries in the quarter were $57 million. Our average is $35-ish $40 million a quarter. And so we're just seeing really strong payment performance and collections across all aspects of the delinquency spectrum. In our reserves, we don't necessarily expect that to continue as we think about the life of a loan in the future and so it's one of those things we're just going to continue to look at on a quarterly basis the reserves of moving down and there's a lot of dynamics that go into that, but I think -- I think the net view is it's positive but we're being cautious as there is still some uncertainty on the horizon.

Rick Shane -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Got it. Yeah, I think it's an important consideration just in the context of how we're looking at reserves more broadly in consumer finance because you guys are uniquely positioned to sort of recapture portfolio every 12 to 18 months.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. For us it's also a reason why we focus on the capital generation of the business which excludes those reserving because it is especially under siege so very much a timing event and so we try to stay focused on the actual economic returns of the business for that reason.

Rick Shane -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Got it. Great clarification. Thank you guys very much.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Rick.

Operator

The next question comes from the line of Kenneth Lee with RBC Capital Markets.

Kenneth Lee -- RBC Capital -- Analyst

Hi, good morning. Thanks for taking my question. Just around the improvements in origination bonds you saw in the quarter wondered is there any other details you'd like to call out either in terms of geographies or particular customer segments they saw any market improvement versus others? Thanks.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. Thanks. Kenneth, we're seeing strong demand across all of our geographies and across all of our customers. So there's really no -- nothing particular there I mean I'll just point out again. Demand was flat 2019 to 2021, but we were up 10% and we do credit. Many of our product innovations, channel innovations, adding new channel partners operational enhancements. It's a lot of things that we've been talking about over the last couple of years starting to come to fruition and seeing it in our results.

Kenneth Lee -- RBC Capital -- Analyst

Got you. Very helpful. And just one follow-up if I may. Do you anticipate any changes in terms of underwriting or your credit box over the near term and was there any changes in the most recently completed quarter. Thanks.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, look we continue to refine our credit box and every every month there is changes based on looking at economic input, looking at things across geographies and industries. We're always refining our model, we're always getting more proprietary data. Broadly speaking, we're no longer expecting stress losses in most geographic regions and industries. We do still have some anticipated increased loss. So what I would say is we're very disciplined. We underwrite to 20% ROEs across our portfolio. There's a lot of inputs that go into that and we continue to hone it but our credit box is definitely more open now than it was a year ago but that's gradually been shifting and it's been refined across geographies and industries. But at this point, our underwriting is largely assuming not a lot of stress in the market or for our customers going forward.

Kenneth Lee -- RBC Capital -- Analyst

Very helpful, thank you very much.

Operator

The next question will come from the line of John Rowan with Janney.

John Rowan -- Janney -- Analyst

Good morning, guys. Just quick question. Most of my questions have been answered. Is there any timing around the possibility of a change in the composition of the Board?

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Look all our stockholders agreement governance the right of the consortium that bought large share in 2018 to appoint members to the Board and that agreement is publicly filed. At certain thresholds of ownership their ability to appoint directors decreases. Regarding timing, we expect any transition to happen in an orderly manner over time. That agreement, which again publicly filed contemplates that the timing of any resignations of directors is no later than when the director is next up for reelection. So I think any changes we would want to make sure orderly. I'd also note that that group appointed number of highly qualified independent directors who played an important role in the success of the company. So as a board there is definitely a consideration around continuity and stability, so that we don't have any interruption in the forward momentum that we've got as a company.

John Rowan -- Janney -- Analyst

Certainly I don't think that there is any rush to make a change, but the shareholders or the Board members that would gain the majority there -- when do they come up for reelection?

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, we have three-year terms on a rotating basis. So it just all depends on the Board member.

John Rowan -- Janney -- Analyst

Okay. All right, thank you.

Operator

The final question will come from the line of Kevin Barker with Piper Sandler.

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

Yeah, I just wanted to follow up on the growth outlook. How much of that growth has been driven by some higher FICO digitally based lending that you typically want in target pre-pandemic or earlier than that. I realize you expand it a little bit more lending toward borrowers closer to 700 FICO versus a 620 FICO. And so can you give us an idea of what that looks like by making those 700 FICO digitally baselines.

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Kevin, I'll touch on that, Micah. One of the things we've talked about in terms of our strategic initiatives Doug laid out we think it's the majority of our growth particularly in June, has been driven by the things we've done in the business. One of those is around loan and pricing optimization. So we've talked about in the past with the word strategic pricing as well. I think that's what you're talking about. So I would say, we're still -- we remain focused on being the lender of choice for near prime, we've seen an opportunity over the last year to use some pricing leverage to add customers that are in that 680 to 700 FICO range particularly on our affiliate channels where there's a little bit more rate shopping and so that's why we've been successful there. You've seen a little bit of a shift in the originations toward a higher FICO. But I would say, we remain focused on that near prime customer.

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

Okay. Thank you very much.

Operator

That does conclude the question-and-answer session of today's conference. I would now like to turn the conference over to Mr. Shulman for closing remarks.

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Hey, just want to thank everyone for joining. Know it's a busy time for you. Our team is here if you've got follow-up questions. Love to hear from you and hope everyone has a great day.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 54 minutes

Call participants:

Peter Poillon -- Head of Investor Relations

Doug Shulman -- Chaiman & Chief Executive Officer

Micah Conrad -- Chief Financial Officer

Michael Kaye -- Wells Fargo -- Wall Street Analyst

Kevin Barker -- Piper Sandler -- Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst

John Hetcht -- Jefferies -- Managing Director

Mark Devries -- Barclays -- Senior Research Analyst

Claude Maurer -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Rick Shane -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Kenneth Lee -- RBC Capital -- Analyst

John Rowan -- Janney -- Analyst

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