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International Flavors & Fragrances inc (NYSE:IFF)
Q3 2021 Earnings Call
Nov 9, 2021, 10:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to the IFF Third Quarter 2021 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions] I would now like to introduce Michael DeVeau, Head of Investor Relations. You may begin.

Michael DeVeau -- Senior Vice President, Chief Investor Relations and Communications Officer

Thank you. Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening, everyone. Welcome to IFF's Third Quarter 2021 Conference Call. Yesterday, we issued a press release announcing our third quarter financial results and our outlook for the remainder of 2021. A copy of the release can be found on our IR website at ir.iff.com. Please note that this call is being recorded live and will be available for replay. I ask that you take a moment to review our forward-looking statements. During the call, we'll be making forward-looking statements about the company's performance and business outlook. These statements are based on how we see things today and contain elements of uncertainty. For additional information concerning the factors that can cause actual results to differ materially from our forward-looking statements, please refer to our cautionary statement and risk factors stated in yesterday's press release. Today's presentation will include non-GAAP financial measures, which exclude those items that we believe affect comparability. A reconciliation of these non-GAAP financial measures to their respective GAAP measures is available on our website. Please also note that we will be using combined historical results for the third quarter, defined as three months of legacy IFF results and three months of N&B results and for nine months year-to-date defined as nine months of legacy IFF January to September and eight months of N&B February to September, in both the 2020 and 2021 period to allow for comparability in light of the merger completion on February 1, 2021. With me on the call today is our Chairman and CEO, Andreas Fibig; and our recently appointed Executive Vice President and CFO, Glenn Richter. We will begin today's call with our prepared remarks and then we'll take any questions that you may have at the end. I would now like to turn the call over to Andreas.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Mike. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening, everyone, and I thank you for joining us today. Before I dive into our performance results, I would like to take a moment to thank all of our dedicated colleagues around the world, who have continued to work tirelessly in a challenging environment to fuel the global consumer goods supply chain and meet our customers' needs. I can't thank each and every one of you enough for your hard work, dedication and focus. I also want to take a moment and welcome Glenn Richter, who is joining us on today's call for the first time. As you know, Glenn joined us a little over a month ago as our new Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. I'm sure you will all find that his experience aligns perfectly with our strategic goals, making him an incredible asset to our team. I also want to thank Rustom for his leadership and contributions during his time as IFF's CFO. Rustom played an important role in our combination with DuPont N&B. And for that, we are immensely grateful. He has been important in putting IFF in the strong position it is today. We wish him all the best in his future endeavors. On today's call, I will begin by providing an overview of year-to-date performance, including the progress we have made so far on our integration. I will then turn it over to Glenn, who will provide a more detailed look at our third quarter financial results. Before we conclude today's call with a question-and-answer session, Glenn will also speak to our outlook for the remainder of the year. Now as I mentioned, I'd like to kick us off on Slide six by discussing our financial highlights for the first nine months of 2021. Throughout the third quarter, we remained laser focused on extending the momentum IFF established in the first half of 2021.

In the first nine months of 2021, IFF achieved $8.6 billion in sales, representing 10% growth or 7% on a currency-neutral basis, a strong reflection of the strength of our market-leading platform and the compelling position we have established with our customers as a combined company. We delivered a 22% adjusted operating EBITDA margin and a combined EBITDA growth of 5%. As we will discuss in more detail, we continue to confront meaningful inflationary pressure due to higher raw material, logistics and energy costs. We have maintained our robust cost discipline efforts and are entering the fourth quarter with continued financial strength, having achieved $884 million free cash flow or approximately 10% of our trailing nine months sales, driven by strong cash generation. This cash generation has enabled us to stay on track to meeting our deleveraging target. Finally, as I've mentioned in previous quarters, continued refinement and optimization of our portfolio is a critical component of our ongoing integration efforts. I'm pleased to share that we have completed the divestiture of our food preparation business and are on track to complete the divestiture of our microbial control business in the second quarter of 2022. Together, these two important divestitures will create a more focused IFF, allowing us to hone in on the constraints of our core business segments and it creates a stronger, more focused business. We will continue to evaluate and optimize our portfolio as we move forward with our integration, looking for opportunities to rapidly divesting other noncore businesses. We started this year with a simple commitment to focus on execution and deliver on the potential of the new IFF. I'm pleased to say that even in a very challenging global environment, our team has met our integration objectives, while delivering strong results with continued sales momentum and profit growth.

Now turning to Slide 7. I'd like to walk you through some of the regional sales dynamics underpinning our results for the last nine months. First, I'm excited to share that we continue to experience strong growth in all four of our key operating regions despite ongoing and unique market uncertainties that have persisted across each geography. In North America, we achieved 7% growth across all four of IFF's business divisions, led by high single-digit growth in Nourish and Scent. These two divisions have continued to perform exceptionally well, quarter after quarter. In Asia, we experienced a 7% increase in sales led by continued double-digit growth in India as well as a low single-digit growth in China, even amid particularly strong recent market complexities in the region. From a business unit perspective, Nourish, Scent and Pharma Solutions continued to carry the region's growth throughout the year-to-date. Latin America continues to be our strongest performing region and sales growth leader, having achieved 12% growth, largely fueled by double-digit growth in our Nourish and Scent divisions and continued local currency strength. Perhaps, most impressive is a 7% sales growth that our EMEA region achieved to date, which includes a robust double-digit increase in the third quarter, impressive performance on our Scent and Nourish divisions growth, this encouraging rebound with Scent delivering double-digit growth led by our Fine Fragrance business and Nourish delivering high single-digit growth led by our Food Service business. We expect this momentum to continue through the remainder of the year, and we will stay diligent to ensure our business remains nimble, positioned to perform against any new supply chain challenges that may arise. Moving now to Slide 8, I'd like to take a closer look at our nine months year-to-date sales performance across IFF's key business segments.

Our largest division, Nourish, has been a strong performer throughout the year, achieving currency-neutral sales growth of 9% with broad-based strength from our Flavors, Ingredients and Food Design businesses. Scent has had a similar strong year delivering 8% in currency-neutral growth to date, led by impressive double-digit growth in Fine Fragrance as well as strong growth in Consumer Fragrance and Ingredients. Health & Bioscience has seen strong demand in key focus areas including Home & Personal Care, Animal Nutrition and Cultures & Food Enzymes. As you know, we are in the process of selling our Microbial Control unit, which has continued to experience headwinds through this year but has rebounded from COVID-impacted lows with growth in both Q2 and Q3. This divestiture should further enhance the performance of this important division. Pharma Solutions, despite significant challenges, is flat so far for the year. Supply chain challenges have had an outsized impact on this division throughout the year. While we have seen encouraging growth in our Industrial business, the division still struggles to meet customer demand due to raw material availability challenges and logistics issues. Now on Slide 9, you will see that we have outlined some of the factors influencing the growth and profitability of each of our four divisions so far this year. As I previously mentioned, Nourish has had a strong year with Flavors and Ingredients experiencing double-digit growth. We have been working hard in our execution to manage volume and cost to limit margin impact from higher raw material costs, which continued to be a headwind on our profitability. While we have seen some margin impact of about 20 basis points in the year, we are proud of how our execution has mitigated much of the negative headwinds, while delivering meaningful growth. Our team has did an exceptional job increasing prices to combat inflationary pressures, something that will continue to be critical as we move forward.

In Health & Bioscience, we mentioned broad-based growth across the markets, but here, we are seeing significant margin impacts from higher logistic costs. As shared on our second quarter call, part of this that freight rates have increased significantly, but also we are having higher logistic costs to balance robust customer demand and available capacity. We have increased capacity investments in this business to support long-term growth, investing in R&D and plant technology to increase output later this year and into 2022. The Scent division has certainly realized the strongest, all-around bounce back as consumer demand rises across end markets. Notably, Fine Fragrances alone has realized 36% growth year-to-date with double-digit growth in Cosmetic Active and continued solid performance in Consumer Fragrances. At the time, sales profitability expansion of 110 basis points has been led by higher volume, favorable mix and higher productivity. As I mentioned, Pharma Solutions was the only division in which we did not experience sales growth due to continued global supply chain challenges that have impacted our ability to meet strong customer demand. These challenges, including supply and logistic constraints and ongoing inflation have, in turn, significantly pressured our margin compared to the first nine months of 2020. Moving to the fourth quarter and entering 2022, we will be closely tracking supply chain dynamics, and we'll continue to prioritize returning our Pharma Solutions business to the profitability we know is achievable. And in the fourth quarter, we're expecting year-over-year top and bottom line performance to improve. As we have been talking about today, IFF is realizing very strong sales momentum across our business.

This is a reflection of the powerful new position we have created through our combination with the N&B business and a compelling value proposition we can offer to our customers. While we are pleased to put many of the gross headwinds related to the pandemic behind us, it is important to understand that our growth this year is, in fact, meaningful above pre-pandemic results. If you look at the total business, you will see that on a comparable 9-month pro forma basis, the new IFF has realized 9% sales growth over 2019 results. This strength is broad-based too. Each segment is realizing strong growth above pre-pandemic levels. Nourish is a business that was particularly hard hit through the pandemic, is now strongly growing with sales growth of 9% compared to pro forma 2019 9-month period. And important, especially given that much of the integration work is coming from within this division, these results showcase how our position in the market has been fundamentally strengthened through the merger and how our teams are delivering the full potential of IFF to our customers. Moving to Slide 11, I would like to discuss the strong progress we have made in terms of synergy realization. For just nine months, since completing our merger with N&B, our synergy progress reaffirms the tremendous opportunity we have in front of us as a combined company. Having received significant and highly encouraging positive feedback from our customers, along with persistent robust customer demand, we are confident in our ability to meet our revenue target. To date, revenue synergies have started to contribute to our top line performance, and we are pleased that our project pipeline is strong and growing.

In the first nine months of 2021, we've achieved approximately $40 million in cost synergies, representing nearly 90% of our 2021 cost synergy target with one quarter to go. This was largely a result of the comprehensive savings programs we have implemented, where we are leveraging our increased scale and optimizing our organization. I'm confident that we will more than exceed our $45 million year one synergy target. And I'm encouraged by the continued progress we are making toward achieving our 3-year run rate of cost synergy target of $300 million. Now before I turn the call over to Glenn, I want to spend a second to really underscore what he brings to us here at IFF. His background is perfect, but there are two areas I think really stand out. First, he brings tremendous depth with private and public companies and leading finance teams to enhance discipline and build processes that drive toward a goal of shareholder value creation. He has time and time again shown an ability to help businesses accelerate top line growth while driving margin expansion. In this way, he consistently implements productivity initiatives with lasting impact. Second, he has been through several large-scale M&A integrations with a track record of strong success. As we continue to execute on our multiyear transformational integration, this experience is invaluable. With that, I'd like to turn the call over to Glenn.

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Thank you for the warm welcome, Andreas, and good morning, afternoon and evening to everyone. Since joining IFF in late September, I've had the opportunity to briefly meet many in our investor community. And the most common questions I've been asked is why did I join IFF and what are my near-term priorities. Consequently, before I review our financial results, I thought it would be helpful to briefly provide these perspectives as an introduction. There were three very compelling reasons for me to join IFF. First, and perhaps most importantly, IFF is a company that is truly making a difference in helping solve some of the world's biggest challenges. We are delivering reliable, innovative and sustainable solutions that are directly helping address issues such as improved nutrition and wellness, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating a more sustainable environment. Second, the industry has very attractive organic growth characteristics, benefiting from continued strong consumer tailwinds from increased consumer focus on wellness and natural and sustainable products, increased demand in emerging markets and new consumer needs presented by aging demographics in developed markets. I also believe that scale will become an important basis of competitive advantage as customers demand leading ESG platforms, increased innovation and speed to market, global supply chain resiliency and help in navigating increasingly complex regulations. Third, I firmly believe that the combination of IFF with DuPont's legacy N&B business has uniquely created an industry-leading platform. And since joining IFF, I've tried to immerse myself in the business completely, visiting sites, meeting with our business and operations teams and spending time at our R&D and creative centers.

I've also prioritized hearing from you, our investors and analysts. And frankly, today, I'm even more bullish on the strength of IFF's global capabilities and the tremendous long-term potential we have to drive strong top and bottom line growth. Relative to my near-term priorities, I have four primary areas of focus. By far, our most pressing priority is to tackle the challenges from the global inflationary environment and to successfully execute broad-based pricing actions across all of our businesses. Second, I'm also focused on enhancing our core financial processes and metrics, including better forecasting, improved business-level return metrics and tighter disciplines for our investment decisions, so that we're maximizing our growth potential and return on invested capital. A third area of focus is ensuring we fully deliver on our merger synergies, while also accelerating our focus on sustainable productivity. And finally, while we have made very good progress to date on our portfolio optimization, there is significant opportunity remaining. In the days and months ahead, I look forward to learning even more about this organization and engaging with all of you. With that, I'd now like to provide an overview of our consolidated third quarter results. In Q3, IFF generated approximately $3.1 billion in sales, representing a 12% year-over-year increase, primarily driven by the continued double-digit growth in our Nourish division and strong increases in both Scent and Health & Biosciences. In terms of contribution, volume performance was the primary driver of our growth as pricing represented approximately two percentage points in the quarter.

Though our gross margin continued to be challenged by inflationary pressures, it was somewhat offset by our strong cost management focus, which resulted in adjusted operating EBITDA growth of 4%. And while we had solid year-over-year EBITDA growth, our gross margin was down by 210 basis points as our pricing actions recovered only about 65% of our raw material increases or approximately 50% in the third quarter when we include raw material, logistics and energy increases. As we move forward, we are squarely focused on improving this recovery rate relative to the total inflationary basis but expect that in the short term, specifically the fourth quarter, we will see a similar pressure given the time lag of price realization. Let me finish on this slide by saying that we achieved strong earnings per share, excluding amortization of $1.47. On the next few slides, I will dive deeper into the third quarter financial results for each of our four divisions. Turning to Slide 13, I'll start with our Nourish division, which had an exceptional quarter. In Q3, Nourish achieved 17% year-over-year sales growth or 15% on a currency-neutral basis, driven by robust double-digit growth in Flavors for the second consecutive quarter. Ingredients also grew double digits with all subcategories, protein solutions, pectin and seaweed extracts, emulsifiers and sweeteners and cellulosics, LPG and food protection, increasing double digits. Food Design also grew double digits, led by Food Service, where pandemic-related restrictions continue to be lifted with away-from-home consumer behaviors returning to more typical levels.

As a result of strong volume growth, price increases and our focus on cost management, Nourish achieved an adjusted operating EBITDA increase of 19% and margin expansion of 30 basis points. On Slide 14, you'll see that our Health & Biosciences division saw year-over-year sales growth of 7% or 5% on a currency-neutral basis, led by double-digit growth in Home & Personal Care and high single-digit growth in Cultures & Food Enzymes. Our Health category was soft this quarter due to a particularly strong double-digit year-ago comparison, so we are pleased with the results when we look at it on a 2-year basis. As Andreas mentioned earlier, inflationary pressures and higher logistics and energy costs to keep up with the robust customer demand has challenged our margins across our business, with H&B particularly impacted, which drove an operating EBITDA decrease of 12%. Unpacking this a bit deeper, the bulk or 70% of our year-over-year EBITDA decline came from higher air freight volumes, where we have increased intercompany shipments to manage available capacity. As we shared last quarter, we have increased capacity investments in this business to support long-term growth and have also invested in R&D and plant technology to increase output. Until then, we will be incurring higher costs to support our customer demand, and this will impact our EBITDA margin. Turning now to Slide 15. Our Scent division continues to perform extremely well and experienced strong growth, achieving 10% year-over-year growth or 9% growth on a currency-neutral basis.

This performance was driven by Fine Fragrances' continued rebound, which grew approximately 36%, led by new customer wins and improved volumes. Our Ingredients category also continues to perform well and contributed to Scent's overall success, seeing double-digit growth for the second consecutive quarter led by strong performance in both Cosmetic Actives and Fragrance Ingredients. While our Consumer Fragrances business saw modest low single-digit growth against a strong double-digit year ago comparison, this is a marked improvement from Q2, and we expect further growth as we move forward. On a 2-year average basis, Consumer Fragrance remained strong at 9% in the third quarter. Scent also experienced adjusted operating EBITDA growth of 10%, driven by strong volume growth and favorable mix. Margin was down modestly due to higher raw materials and logistics costs, a trend we see continuing. I will provide more context shortly. Lastly, in our Pharma Solutions business, we saw a currency-neutral sales decrease of 2% due to continued supply chain challenges related to raw material availability and logistics disruptions, which have made it challenging to meet persistent and growing customer demand. While Industrials has continued to recover from COVID-19 lows, our core Pharma business saw soft performance against its solid year-ago comparison. The division's adjusted operating EBITDA and margin also continue to be impacted by higher sourcing, logistics and manufacturing costs. We also continue to see the impact of force majeures and raw material shortages with suppliers and shutdowns due to Hurricane Ida, resulting in unplanned outages in some of our product lines.

While we expect the current market environment and macro supply chain problems to continue challenging the segment, we remain optimistic and as Andreas mentioned earlier, we remain focused on returning the division to profitability as these industry conditions stabilize. Now on Slide 17, I would like to review our cash flow position and leverage dynamics for the first nine months of 2021, both of which remain a top priority for us. So far this year, IFF has generated $884 million in free cash flow, with cash flow from operations totaling approximately $1.1 billion. As the team has mentioned in previous quarters, we are investing in our growth accretive businesses as well as integration activities. Year-to-date, we have spent $242 million or approximately 2.8% of sales on capex and expect a significant ramp-up in fourth quarter as our annual spend is traditionally more back half weighted. From a leverage perspective, we are continuing to make substantial progress toward achieving our deleveraging target, with our cash and cash equivalents finishing at $794 million, including $122 million restricted cash, with gross debt reduced by $446 million versus the second quarter to $11.5 billion due to our debt maturity schedule as part of our deleverage plan. Our trailing 12-month credit-adjusted EBITDA totaled approximately $2.7 billion, with a 4.1 times net debt to credit-adjusted EBITDA. With our continued strong cash flow generation, including proceeds from divested noncore businesses, we remain confident that IFF is on track to achieve our deleveraging target of less than three times net debt to EBITDA within 20 to 36 months, post-transaction close. Turning to Slide 18. I'd like to take a moment to discuss the cost inflation trends that have impacted our business this year. As I mentioned earlier, IFF and the industry at large have seen significant year-over-year inflation increases, which have been accelerating in the recent quarter.

The inflationary pressures we are seeing today are significant. Just as examples, vegetable oil prices hit a record high after rising by almost 10% in October. The price of wheat is up almost 40% in the last 12 months through October. Brent crude prices have more than doubled over the past 12 months to the highest level since October 2018. In the U.S., natural gas prices are up 100% from a year ago and in the U.K. grew up about 500%. And transportation rates have increased significantly given the high demand and limited capacity to ship. Across the raw materials, logistics and energy markets, like many industries around the world, we have seen costs accelerate each quarter, which has led to our margins being adversely impacted. For example, in the first half of 2021, gross margin was down about 150 basis points, while in the third quarter, we were down about 210 basis points. As we look ahead, we are being prudent in our planning as we expect these inflationary pressures will continue throughout the fourth quarter and over the course of 2022. Consequently, this will require us to successfully implement significant pricing actions across each of our businesses as well as improve our sourcing efficiencies, accelerate operational improvements and capture targeted integration synergies to drive profit growth. Now moving to Slide 19. I would like to share what this means for our consolidated financial outlook. For the full year 2021, we are maintaining the increased total revenue forecast we announced in September to account for the strong demand. For the full year 2021, we are targeting $11.55 billion in total revenue or approximately 8.5% growth, up from the forecast of $11.4 billion or 7% growth that we disclosed in the second quarter. We also expect our sales growth to continue in the fourth quarter as our Q4 quarter-to-date sales trend is solid. As mentioned, unprecedented macro supply chain challenges and inflationary pressures continue to impact our industry, and we do expect this to continue in the foreseeable future.

While we are intently focused on offsetting these inflationary pressures through pricing actions, these are lagging the inflationary pressures. And as a result, we have further revised our adjusted EBITDA margin to be modestly below 21%, down from approximately 21.5% that was forecasted in September. About half of this reduction is due to lower gross margin in the third quarter and the other half stemming from higher cost trends we see in the fourth quarter. For the full year, we are targeting low single-digit EBITDA growth, a solid improvement in light of the external challenges. We also adjusted our capex spend outlook down as we have been very thoughtful in balancing near-term operating priorities with the need to add capacity to support accretive growth across our businesses. Overall, we are pleased of the progress we've made to date, strong top line growth and a commitment to meet near-term macro cost pressures, and we're confident that IFF is on the right path and poised for continued success across our core business. I'll now turn the call back over to Andreas for some closing remarks.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Glenn. Before I wrap it up, I'd like to reiterate how proud I am of IFF and our thousands of employees around the world who have showcased a remarkable resilience toward an evolving and continuously uncertain industry environment. We have continued to deliver strong year-over-year sales and profit growth, and I'm confident that with our top-notch financial and operational structure supported by Glenn's financial leadership, we will be able to maintain and bolster our strong financial profile, while continuing to deliver for both our shareholders and our customers. Q4 is off to a solid start, and I know that our momentum will propel us to achieve strong sales growth for the full year and bring us another step closer to achieving our synergy targets. In sum, it is clear to me that IFF is in an incredible strong position. We knew entering this year that the new IFF was poised to change our industry. But to do so, we had to execute. As we look at industry-leading sales growth for the full year, I'm just so proud of how everyone here stepped up and executed on our vision and delivered against our potential. IFF is once again the clear leader of this field, creating another iconic chapter in this company's 132-year legacy. This core strength of the business is why I felt now was the perfect time to start the transition to find IFF's next CEO. I have every confidence that now is the right time to let the next chapter of IFF legacy begin. As we announced, the search has begun for my successor, and we expect that person to be in place by early 2022. I'm fully committed to a seamless transition and look forward to talking to you all about this more in the near future. Thank you all for your support. With that, I would like to open the call for questions. Thank you.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from Heidi Vesterinen with Exane BNP Paribas. Your line is open.

Heidi Maria Vesterinen -- Exane BNP Paribas -- Analyst

Good morning, everyone. I have a question for Glenn, actually. And thanks for the intro on why you joined IFF. What do you think of IFF's long-term targets, please?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Thanks for the question. We have to sort of break them down relative to the component parts. First of all, relative to top line, as we mentioned, we're very pleased. We're tracking extremely well versus the long-term targets. And then when you take a look at how we're tracking versus competition, which is another great indicator, we're actually very pleased in terms of there. So we sort of checked that. We would say relative to our deleverage target, getting below three times by year three, we're feeling very comfortable with that. The combination of the cash flow generation from the business remains strong. And as you know, we've announced a couple of divestitures, and we continue to look at other noncore businesses. So I would check both that, both the deleverage as well as our free cash flow. The area that really needs work is around our long-term margin objective. As you know, we have a 26% EBITDA margin target. That was easier when we started off with a higher number at the beginning of the year. And versus the most recent guidance, we're now about 500 basis points off that relative to the guidance this year. So as we approach our '22 plan, we're spending energy sort of thinking about that multiyear target. I think structurally, there are a couple of factors that we think still play in favor of not only increasing where we are from an EBITDA margin, but potentially getting us back to that. One is clearly the biggest impact this year unexpected has been the inflationary environment. And Andreas will probably talk more about this, but we've lost about 200 basis points this year at our margin relative to inflation, net of what we expect to price. And in addition, we've had some pockets of higher use of freight costs in a couple of our businesses. So that's about 200 basis points. We still feel very confident on achieving the long-term synergy objectives, so the cost synergies. And I would submit there's sort of probably additional productivity in the business. We -- if you strip out the material side of our business, we have over $4 billion of cost between our manufacturing operations and then our S&A. And I think we've just sort of begun to scratch the surface relative to that with our synergy targets. That being said, we are working very intently right now to sort of think about and actuate our pricing initiatives and also think about our longer-term productivity as well.

Operator

Our next question comes from Matthew DeYoe with Bank of America. Your line is open.

Matthew Porter DeYoe -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

Good morning. I appreciate all the added detail in the slides on the cost side, but just trying to understand better the margin contraction a bit and how we got to the point where we're cutting the guidance again. I mean, so if I look at 3Q and then moving into 4Q, can we talk a little bit about how costs are coming in versus where you had budgeted them? And on that end, can you push price to offset logistics costs for businesses that you've just won recently? Or is this kind of just a cost of doing business and that margin component is going to come down or improve when costs and capacity come up?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Matt, so this is Glenn. I'll start with answering and then maybe turn it over to Andreas. In general, the biggest hit, as I just mentioned on our business this year, has basically been material cost broadly impacting our business. Of the 200 basis points, it has impacted us and anticipated impact is about 200 basis points in terms of margin. About 2/3 of that is related to rate increases. So that's a combination of our raw materials, our energy and our logistics costs. What's happening relative to each of those buckets is earlier in the year, we were thinking mid-single-digit relative to inflation in raw materials. It's now high single digits, approaching 10% in terms of the annual inflation. We're seeing logistics costs continue to accelerate that to the mid-teens. And then energy, as everyone is well aware, has been extremely volatile, and it's been trending up about 30% year-over-year. By the way, the planning posture for '21 is we really had relatively flat inflationary pressure. So we didn't expect any of our material cost to go up. So we have a much, much more significant impact relative to what we'd anticipated just a couple of quarters ago. I would say the rest of our cost structure is working quite well. We have actually delivered strong results against our R&D, sales and administrative expenses. We're actually exceeding plan relative to our costs. So we're actually lower at that point. In general, manufacturing is working on productivity, although constraints in our system have limited some of the capacity gains we can get in some of the efficiencies out of the system. The pricing dynamics are that we are working very, very aggressively on capturing the pricing.

But to date, we're capturing and expect to capture only about $0.50 on the dollar from inflation this year. And that's simply a lag factor relative to our ability to go to market and implement. I will note that as we look out in '22, we are anticipating those inflationary trends to continue into next year, and we are basically planning our pricing actions accordingly, i.e. each of our businesses are thinking about not only what has hit us this year, but what we anticipate to hit next year, and we're executing against that. To your last point on pace, that depends by business. We have some but not a lot of multiyear contracts. In a lot of most cases, we have annual contracts, and in many of -- or not most of those cases, they tend to run on a fiscal cycle, so beginning of the year forward. But last comment I would make is we're sort of in, I'd say, unprecedented environment, given the level of inflation. So it is affording us an opportunity to go back in almost all cases to our customers and discuss the inflationary environment vis-a-vis our pricing going forward, even when we have sort of contractual relationships in place. So let me maybe turn it over to Andreas.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Glenn. I think it's a very comprehensive answer. Just on one aspect you asked, Matt, on the logistics. Obviously, we go back on logistics as well either with price increases or surcharges, and it's a bit tougher for newly won contracts, obviously. But we try what we can do because that has a huge impact on our business, in particular on the Health & Bioscience business. But here, I think there's another element in it is we are working to increase capacity because there's a lot of demand, in particular for our Enzyme business and we are building -- we just installed our new fermenters in Hanko in Finland, and there's more to come for the first half of next year, which will help us to decrease logistic costs here as well and fulfill what we get in terms of demand from our customers. We're very optimistic on this one because the technology is superior, and it's certainly a good growth driver for us going forward.

Operator

We'll take our next question from Mark Astrachan with Stifel. Your line is open.

Mark Stiefel Astrachan -- Stifel -- Analyst

Yes, thanks and good morning everyone. I guess just building on the last question, Glenn, maybe specifically, if you're willing to talk about it, and obviously, you're early in the process, but how do you currently see inflation for '22? And how should we think about when you expect to have enough pricing implemented to cover inflation? Obviously, you talked about $0.50 on the dollar, but what's the time line for more pricing to be in place? And also, how do you think about offsets in terms of dollars versus margin recovery and the timing therein?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Thanks for the question, Mark. You sort of semi-answered it with the intro is we're in the early phases of locking down the '22 plan. We desire to go out early in the year with as much as we can relative to our pricing actions. However, the pace at which we're able to implement that vis-a-vis the pace of inflation, we're not sure, if you will, when the curves will cross over from the standpoint. It's likely to be sort of late second quarter into the second half of the year. But I would say stay tuned, we're really still working on that.

Operator

The next question comes from Adam Samuelson with Goldman Sachs. Your line is open.

Adam L. Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Hi, thank you. Good morning, everyone. I guess, first, Andreas, you talked through some of the regional and business sales trends a little bit more on a year-to-date basis. Hoping you could kind of frame that kind of from the third quarter and into the fourth, kind of where some of the pluses and minuses are. And specifically, within that kind of organic sales guidance, kind of where pricing was in the third quarter and where you think it's going to be in the fourth as we evaluate kind of what the tailwind in '22 could be as you go back to customers on price? And if I could just sneak a quick other one in on synergy realization. Can you just help us think about the cadence of cost and revenue synergy realization in '22, especially on the cost side, where it would seem like an inflationary environment makes it harder to achieve some of the procurement savings that have been previously targeted?

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thank you, Adam, for the question. So what we have seen in Q2 and Q3, I said we had around about 2% price. The rest was volume. Going forward, we might see a little bit more in the fourth quarter in terms of price. But as we said, we had a good start sales-wise into the fourth quarter. So October came in good, we don't have the final P&L yet, so we can't talk about that. Synergy realization is going actually, on the cost synergies, extremely well. As you have seen, we have already realized $40 million in the first three quarters of the $45 million we have promised. So it's very, very likely that we will overachieve. On the sales synergies, we are very much on track. And I see when I visit our facilities, and I was basically out there in the field the last week in Europe, but the teams are working very nicely and very, very well together. So we see that more sales synergies are coming in. And that shows that we are building a very, very strong position for the company going forward. In terms of the different categories as well, we see still a good -- and good performance on the Fine Fragrance side, which is very, very helpful. It's not just a good recovery, but it's a good growth rate here as well. And that's helping the whole result for the company going forward. I think that's what we can say about the fourth quarter.

Operator

The next question comes from Gunther Zechmann with Bernstein. Your line is open.

Gunther Zechmann -- Sanford C. Bernstein -- Analyst

Hi, thanks for taking my question. And welcome, Glenn. The third on the slide looks very useful, so most of the active ingredients from Lucas Meyer Cosmetics. Thanks for sharing the percentage change in raw material versus freight versus logistics. Can I just check that the numbers you gave earlier, Glenn, would you include in the full year guidance or current run rate? And then pricing has picked up to 2% of sales in Q3. Can you share the exit run rate out of Q3 or end of October, if you have it? And what further increases you expect to push through, please?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Gunther, good to hear from you. I'll answer the second question first. Q4 pricing, i.e. the exit rate from Q3 is going to be very consistent with Q3. So it's about two points. It's slightly higher in Q4 versus Q3. And as a result of that, actually, the inflation pressures are going to slightly outpace, once again within the quarter, just given the cost increases from the standpoint. Just as a follow-up to that, really, we're focused on aggressively implementing late this year into '22 on that front. Of the full year margin guidance, and relative to the freight impact, we have about 200 basis points associated with cost. About 2/3 of that is pure rate and about 1/3 of that or about 60 basis points is related to higher usages of freight, principally air and principally to support our H&B business because of capacity limitations. So that piece, as Andreas had mentioned, will take us some time to work out through '22 as we address some of the capacity constraints.

Operator

The next question comes from John Roberts with UBS. Your line is open.

John Ezekiel E. Roberts -- UBS Investment Bank -- Analyst

Thank you. And best wishes Andreas for the future, and welcome, Glenn. Andreas, your customers are seeing a lot of bulk raw material cost increases. So they're probably feeling even more cost pressure than you are. Do you see more reformulation going on? And is that providing any opportunities for more wins if your customers are reformulating their products a little bit more frequently here because of their cost pressures?

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

John, first of all, thank you for the question. It's -- we see reformulation. Is it massively more than what we have seen before? Probably not. But what we see in general, what comes in, in terms of projects, are bigger projects -- are less projects, but bigger projects, which is actually good for us. Taking into consideration that we will win more of these projects, the cost for us is reducing in terms of the average project. So that's what we see at the moment. Indeed, many of our customers see good bulk increases. But the discussion with the procurement people on the customer side is going OK and well because we know what's happening on the raw material frontier. So I think that's where we are. What we see is still that we have really good strong demand from most of our customers. And that's very, very helpful in terms of the business and also in terms of the momentum we have as a business going forward because we have to take into consideration we are still in the integration phase, and we are gaining share. That's what we see also in comparison to our competitors. And we are making good progress in the integration as well. So that's all what I'd say.

Operator

The next question comes from Jeff Zekauskas with JPMorgan. Your line is open.

Jeffrey John Zekauskas -- JPMorgan Chase -- Analyst

Thanks very much. In your initial remarks, Glenn, you said that there remains significant opportunities for portfolio optimization. Does that mean that there's another, I don't know, $500 million to $1 billion in revenues that can be monetized? And second, can you describe or articulate your capital expenditures for 2022 and '23? And what's the arc of capital expenditures? And what are the priorities to spend on?

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Jeff, this is Andreas. On the portfolio, as we said, around about 5% of sales, that's what it is. And we are working on it. More will come probably early next year and then we can be more transparent around it. But we are very happy with the moves we have made on the portfolio, and there's more to come. On the capex, I hand it over to Glenn.

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Sure. So as you recognize, we updated our guidance for this year relative to our full year capex spend of 4%. And that's in part because of just the ability to execute our capital programs well, given all of the different priorities we have in the business. And part of that is just continue to be more surgical, I'll say, relative to our investing capital. We do anticipate that, that will ramp up next year as we're putting together our '22 plan, largely focused on our higher-margin and higher-growth businesses. And a big piece of that actually is really debottlenecking and enhancing our capacity situation into next year. So I'll say more to come around the plan standpoint. We had, I think, previously guided to having spent a little bit more capex around the business going forward for capacity reasons. And then the other area I would just note, although it's a much smaller portion, is around IT. So IT through an integration activity, we have some additional activities as we go into next year as well.

Operator

The next question comes from Lauren Lieberman with Barclays. Your line is open.

Lauren Rae Lieberman -- Barclays Bank PLC -- Analyst

Great, thanks, good morning. I had two questions. First was just the -- generally, operating expenses in the quarter, both SG&A and then R&D specifically, were down quite a bit. And I was just curious if you could comment on how sustainable those changes were. If it reflects maybe incentive compensation again or more tactical reductions given the gross margin pressure. So I was curious about that piece. And then the second thing, unrelated, was just on pharma. You've given the capacity constraints that you've seen and demand outstripping supply, which is great. The only question is where is that demand going? What's the risk that rebuilding, if you call it, relative market share when you do get capacity up is a challenge? I mean where is that business going? And how confident can we be that, that will come back when you get the capacity up?

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Lauren, for the question. The first piece, Glenn will take and then I'll take the follow-up.

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

So relative to our R&D, sales and administrative expenses, as I mentioned, we are favorable to plan down from prior year, but that is not R&D. Actually, R&D is trending right on plan. And by the way, of our roughly $2.1 billion of annual spend for our S&A, about 30% is R&D and the residual is fairly equally split between sales, our commercial team and in administrative. We are seeing actually more efficiencies in the commercial team as they come together post integration and the back office, so the administrative teams as well. So that's really where we're seeing and are pushing more of the productivity, not R&D. We are always looking for ways to more efficiently spend our R&D budget, but we sort of directionally want to make sure that we continue to stay within the guidance we provided relative to our ongoing R&D spend.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

On the follow-up part of the question, the good thing about the pharma excipients business is that it's a very stable business and it's predictable in a sense because you know when you're in a product or in a pharmaceutical that you stay in because everything else would basically require a change with the FDA. That means that our customer base is very stable. So there's probably no big risk that if we increase our capacity that we have too much capacity in place. We see, as I said, good and stable demand. And despite the capacity on our manufacturing side, we had some issues with seaweed harvesting, which goes into one of the products of our big customers, which is -- I can give you details on our one-on-one. And the harvesting now is going better because we have new fields in front of Norway, which we are discovering right now and using much to increase our manufacturing on the side. So just to give you a bit of, let's say, detail around the pharma business. But there's certainly no danger that we overbuilt here.

Operator

The next question comes from Ghansham Panjabi with Baird. Your line is open.

Matthew T. Krueger -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

Okay. Hi, good morning. This is actually Matt Krueger sitting on for Ghansham. Sorry to belabor the point a little bit here, but can you talk about where we are at from a price/cost perspective across both the legacy IFF businesses and then the legacy DuPont businesses? Maybe on a dollar basis, that would be helpful. And then what's the historical price/cost catch-up period for the two legacy businesses? And is there any meaningful difference in catch-up period across your various segments or regions?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Relative to -- good set of questions. Relative to inflation, we're seeing higher rates in legacy N&B and IFF, although we're seeing inflation across all businesses. But generally, we're sort of in mid-single-digit range for legacy IFF and then low double digit relative to legacy N&B. Catch-up period, generally three to six months. Certain businesses like H&B may have a slightly larger percentage that are either an annual contract or a multiyear so it might be slightly lower.

Operator

The next question comes from Chris Parkinson with Mizuho. Your line is open.

Christopher S. Parkinson -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Great, thank you very much. Just based on the growth outlook for certain pieces of the acquired N&B assets, are there any parallels which may require additional capacity in the coming years, just given healthy outlooks? The legacy owner used to speak about some recent expansions already essentially being sold out. So just trying to gauge where the portfolio stands.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. No. Thank you for the question. So you will see probably the biggest expansion on our side on capacity in the Health & Bioscience area. And particularly on the Enzyme business, where we believe that our technology is really top notch. And we see a huge demand from our customers as well, so most of the investments goes into that area. We see some capacity increase, as we said, on the Pharma business but not to the same degree on the legacy Health & Biosciences business. The rest is basically a business as usually on Scent and on Nourish, which is partly legacy N&B as well but more, let's say, maintained than this investment into new plans.

Operator

Our final question today comes from Jonathan Feeney with Consumer Edge. Your line is open.

Jonathan Patrick Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Hi, thanks very much. Forgive me. Just a quick one. As far as the pricing process and your assessment of how easy that is to do, the dialogue, is there any significant difference in the acquired N&B businesses and the legacy businesses that you're running into? Because I did notice it seems like the lag is a little bit greater in the segments that are heavier on acquired revenue, but that there may be other explanations for that. So just curious about the general nature of the business. Is it tougher to take pricing there?

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Well, I think one thing we have to consider is the legacy N&B businesses just have a higher ramp. So the inflationary pressures are more significant in that side. So basically, it just requires, if you will, a bigger lift relative to the implementation from that standpoint.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Sure, absolutely.

Operator

We have no further questions at this time. It is now my pleasure to hand the program back to Andreas Fibig for closing remarks.

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thank you very much for participation. I hope it helped to explain where we are. We are very pleased with where we are in the integration process. And certainly, with the volume performance we are doing as a company, which is good. Thank you very much, and have a good day.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 62 minutes

Call participants:

Michael DeVeau -- Senior Vice President, Chief Investor Relations and Communications Officer

Andreas Fibig -- Chair of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

Glenn Richter -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Heidi Maria Vesterinen -- Exane BNP Paribas -- Analyst

Matthew Porter DeYoe -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

Mark Stiefel Astrachan -- Stifel -- Analyst

Adam L. Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Gunther Zechmann -- Sanford C. Bernstein -- Analyst

John Ezekiel E. Roberts -- UBS Investment Bank -- Analyst

Jeffrey John Zekauskas -- JPMorgan Chase -- Analyst

Lauren Rae Lieberman -- Barclays Bank PLC -- Analyst

Matthew T. Krueger -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

Christopher S. Parkinson -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Jonathan Patrick Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

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