Is This a Hole in Google's Long-Term Nexus Strategy?

Within Google's (Nasdaq: GOOG  ) recently unveiled Nexus lineup, two of the three devices feature cellular connectivity -- but it isn't 4G LTE. That move shows that the search giant is interested in broadening the reach and compatibility of the devices in international markets. Domestic devices all but require LTE to be competitive in the high-end market, including Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL  ) iPhone 5 or Nokia's (NYSE: NOK  ) Lumia 920, for starters. The U.S. market is more focused on LTE than much of the rest of the world, so for now Google's choice to leave it out may be fine. However, in the long run, Big G is going to have to figure out a way to add LTE connectivity.

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  • Report this Comment On November 07, 2012, at 10:07 PM, KirkNoon wrote:

    Maybe 4g LTE is not the wave of the future, but the present technology that has peaked. Word has it that 5G is on its way to fruition in Korea:

    The world's first publicly available LTE service was launched by TeliaSonera in Oslo and Stockholm on 14 December 2009.[3] LTE is the natural upgrade path for carriers with GSM/UMTS networks, but even CDMA holdouts such as Verizon Wireless, who launched the first large-scale LTE network in North America in 2010,[4][5] and au by KDDI in Japan have announced they will migrate to LTE. LTE is, therefore, anticipated to become the first truly global mobile phone standard, although the use of different frequency bands in different countries will mean that only multi-band phones will be able to use LTE in all countries where it is supported.

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