How Tesla and Electric Vehicles Can Make Gas Stations Rich

You may not know it, but gas stations make the bulk of their money selling food and drinks, earning little to nothing at the actual pump. With the wait time to charge a Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA  ) vehicle is equal to about the time it takes to eat a meal, a mutually beneficial opportunity exists for Tesla to partner with TravelCenters of America (NYSE: TA  ) and/or CST Brands (NYSE: CST  ) .

Tesla is busy setting up supercharging stations. On average, it takes anywhere from 20 minutes to 75 minutes for a drivers to charge a Tesla battery. Tesla plans to open stations that connect 80% of the US population in 2014 and 98% by 2015. It plays up the charging wait on its website by stating, "Superchargers are located near amenities like roadside diners, cafes, and shopping centers. Road trippers can stop for a quick meal and have their Model S charged when they're done."

Instead of figuring out the best places to set up new stations from scratch, why doesn't Tesla simply partner with the rest stop experts who already did most of the legwork for them? Tesla would benefit by having its stations in already established, proven, and familiar locations that have a variety places to eat and are already see heavy traffic. The heavily populated aspect of current rest stops allows Tesla the additional bonus of free marketing to the gas-car customers at the stations.

TravelCenters of America and CST Brands would benefit in the most obvious of ways. First, the average gas consumer fills up his tank in three minutes, compared to 20 to 75 minutes for a Tesla charge. It's far more tempting to grab a snack, or even an entire meal, when you have that additional time to kill.

Follow the food
TravelCenters of America owns and operates 247 locations in the United States and Canada. Last quarter, it earned $15.8 million net income or $0.53 EPS on sales of more than $2 billion.

Some 81% of its revenue came from fuel, yet only 30% of its gross profits came from the same source. Profit margins on fuel are a paper-thin 4.4%, while the profit margin on its food, services, and merchandise is a hefty 54.3% --12 times higher. For TravelCenters of America, this means 70% of its profits actually come from the 19% of sales that consist mostly of people grabbing a bite to eat.

Now consider this: Tesla is targeting annual production of over 500,000 vehicles over the next few years. While the number of Tesla vehicles is quite small compared to gas-powered vehicles of 14.5 million sold in 2012, the average weight time of "fill ups" makes up for it.

Use 30 minutes for a Tesla charge, compared to three minutes for a gas fillup. If Tesla had sold 500,000 vehicles in 2012, it might mean 15 million minutes of waiting time on fillups, compared to 42 million minutes for gas-powered cars. When you factor in that people would be more likely to "kill time" during a longer fill up than a shorter one, it's reasonable to expect food sales during this wait to spike dramatically.

CST Brands is "one of the largest independent retailers of motor fuels and convenience merchandise in North America" with nearly 1,900 locations. Last quarter, it earned adjusted net income of $41 million, or $0.31 per share, on $3.3 billion in sales. Almost $2.8 billion, or 85% of sales, came from fuel. 48% of its gross profit came from fuel, while the other 52% came from the 15% of nonfuel sales.

CST Brands' gross margin on fuel is a tiny bit higher than TravelCenters of America at 5%. Just like TravelCenters of America, CBT Brands hopes customers stop and eat because that's where the real money is.

Final foolish thoughts
TravelCenters of America and CST Brands could see dramatic rises in net profit with just tiny increases in food sales. They should be looking to partner with Tesla, and Tesla should be looking to partner with one or both of them. Read the earnings reports of all three along with listening to their conference calls. Any hint of moving forward in this venture would be bullish for any companies named.

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Read/Post Comments (6) | Recommend This Article (6)

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Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 12:38 AM, sliderw wrote:

    Such a partnership sounds like a good idea for the companies and the drivers.

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 8:48 AM, Grumpycat wrote:

    Does the author really think that an affluent Tesla owner would eat a meal at a truckstop like the rest of us poor heathens? Maybe if Travel Centers included a Ruths Chris Steakhouse in every location.

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 9:03 AM, gdalex wrote:

    this is ultimately short-sighted, yes these people will have to stop for longer but a full meal in 40 mins. is nothing compared to the 10 gas drivers they could get through in that time that would easily ought weigh the profits coming from tesla users. 1x$20 meal or 5x$10 snacks. the pure flow of people facilitate much more profits than one person per pump per 20-75 mins

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 9:35 AM, Sudre wrote:

    This sounds like a great idea but being a Tesla driver I can say I am not interested in stopping at a McDonalds or Taco Bell combo gas station for an hour lunch.

    It will probably work well for the GenIII cars. By that time the charge times should be down to 10 to 20 minutes or battery swap will have taken over.

    By that time those places should be contacting Tesla not Tesla contacting them. That would be like a rest stop calling GM to get GM to install a free use gas pump. There are other fast chargers out there that are not Tesla specific. I would think those property owners would want to cater to all BEV owner not just Teslas.

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 1:00 PM, LoveMyTesla wrote:

    Actually, it would behoove any of these travel centers to just start installing their own Level 3 charges that they can lease or purchase AND make money one by charging $3 per hour of charge or something like that.

    Blink and ChargePoint offer profit sharing or purchasing of units that will charge Teslas and any other current or future EV.

    When I drive my Model S to the Texas A&M campus, I charge at the Blink chargers in their parking garages for $1.00 per hour.

  • Report this Comment On November 08, 2013, at 3:29 PM, Blindnomore wrote:

    Don't think this would interest Tesla's management or the gas stops either. Gas stops would want $$ for the realestate the Tesla's would use during the extended wait. And charges cost Tesla users $0 unless they plug in at home because those super chargers are ran using solar power. At least I am pretty sure that was what I read in an article about Tesla's charging stations. The only cost to Tesla is to build and have use of land to build upon. They can always then lease any extra space to the chain of their choice such as a Ruth's Cris as suggested above. Or maybe a sharper image store. I think chances of Tesla building stations itself with xtra capacity to rent space to other storefronts would better suit them.

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