Although we don't believe in timing the market or panicking over market movements, we do like to keep an eye on big changes -- just in case they're material to our investing thesis.

What: Shares of, (NASDAQ:SPRT) fell more than 16% during Wednesday's intraday trading after the company announced preliminary fourth-quarter results and initial first-quarter 2014 guidance.

So what: now expects non-GAAP Q4 revenue in the range of $24.5 million to $25 million, which narrows its previous guidance of $24 million to $26 million. Meanwhile, analysts were modeling Q4 revenue of $25 million.

In addition, says non-GAAP income from continuing operations are now expected to be in the range of $0.08 per share and $0.09 per share, an increase of its previous guidance of $0.06 to $0.08 per share. Finally, at the end of Q4 the company had cash and equivalents remaining of $72 million, a $3.5 million sequential improvement over Q3.

However, also stated first-quarter 2014 revenue should be in the range of $16 million to $18 million, or well below expectations for sales of $21.87 million. This, in turn, should translate to non-GAAP income from continuing operations in the range of minus $0.04 per share to $0.00 per share.

Now what: CEO Josh Pickus weighed in, "We can now estimate the effects of program changes at Comcast on our business and want to update shareholders without delay."

That's fair enough, but I can't blame investors for bidding shares down today. Remember, shares of sank in October after Pickus noted that while changes in Comcast's signature support program shouldn't have a great effect revenue from the cable provider, they would almost certainly result in "considerably lower margins" going forward.

And though he elaborated today with optimism for a "set of new opportunities with Comcast and other industry leaders" in various other industries, I just can't get excited about stock until those catalysts materialize.

Fool contributor Steve Symington has no position in any stocks mentioned, and neither does The Motley Fool. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.