Your Beginning Investing Questions Answered

What is a stock?

Who should invest in the stock market?

Have an investing question you've always been too embarrassed to ask?

We're here to help. From 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. EDT today, Motley Fool Million Dollar Portfolio advisor Ron Gross, Motley Fool Options advisor Jim Gillies, Motley Fool Stock Advisor analyst Jason Moser, Motley Fool Supernova advisor Matthew Argersinger, Motley Fool Pro analyst Bryan Hinmon, Director of Analyst Learning Buck Hartzell, Motley Fool analyst Alex Pape, and Motley Fool analyst Dan Dzombak will take your questions in a live chat. Feel free to toss anything our way -- questions on investing, brokerages, or anything else -- and we'll do our best to discuss what's on your mind.

A few ground rules:

  • We are not permitted to provide personalized financial advice.
  • We may not be able to answer every question.
  • We may have ownership interests in some of the stocks discussed in the live chat. To see the stocks we own, check out our profiles by clicking the links on our names above.

Now, let's get this going. Just click below.

The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.


Read/Post Comments (2) | Recommend This Article (15)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On June 05, 2012, at 7:26 PM, Darwood11 wrote:

    I'm going to take the tack that an education is an investment. In fact, it's investment number 1.

    Investing question number 1: If you go into debt for a college degree, that's an investment in your future. You are taking a risk and the money you put on that credit card to buy beer, or books, will compound over years if you don't promptly pay it back and will reduce your future net worth. The question to ask is "Will the economy need the skills I have gained, when I graduate?"

    Investing question number 2: Ask what is "net worth." if you don't know and you've spent four, five, six or more years in college getting an "education" you should know that you today have a negative net worth, unless someone else paid for your education. So the question to ask is "How much to I need to generate from my education each year, so that I can achieve a positive net worth, invest that net worth and achieve my goals at the age of 60?"

    Investing question number 3. You have at most 40 years to build your wealth and each and every year is significant. If you have a negative net worth at the age of 40, what makes you think that some quick advice will get you caught up? It will take a change in modus operandi to get where you expect to go. So the question to ask is: "What am I doing that isn't working?"

    Fool on!

  • Report this Comment On June 06, 2012, at 1:19 AM, maazzoo69 wrote:

    This discussion was fantastic!!!

    and Darwood11, your points are very significant!. It will be nice to have them shared within high school students.

    Fool on!

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 1903487, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 8/21/2014 9:10:54 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement