The Best Stocks for the Year Ahead

Just when you think Mr. Market couldn't do you much worse, he goes and spits in your Cheerios.

See, stocks struck me as extremely attractive as recently as a week and a half ago. At that point, the S&P 500:

  • Was down around 20% -- from late 1997
  • Was yielding 3.4% -- around an 18-year high
  • Had a price-to-operating earnings ratio -- 12.4 -- at a 19-year low

Naturally, the Gods mocked me by driving the market up 19%.

Between this spurt and the economic bellyache heard 'round the world, I was forced to circle back to my central question: Is this still a good time to buy stocks? And if so, what should you buy?

The truth
Before we get to whether I think this is a good time to buy stocks, let me tell you what I'm not saying: I'm not making any argument about whether or not this is the bottom.

Here's the real deal: No one -- not Warren Buffett, not Meredith Whitney, not even your uncle who wears a Simpsons T-shirt and camo pants each Thanksgiving -- has any realistic insight as to where the market is headed over the next several months. The economy? Sure. The market? No.

See, the stock market tends to act as a leading indicator to the broader economy. In English, that means that the market tends to rise before the economy turns north, and fall before the economy turns south. Blend in historic volatility, and voila -- the task of predicting the market's short-term moves goes from impossible to even more impossible (if that's possible).

So I'm not predicting the bottom -- but I do think this is a good time to buy stocks.

Why buy?
Even though the market could fall further, the long-term prospects for investments look reasonably rosy.

  • World leaders are pulling out nearly all the stops to prevent a catastrophic depression.
  • Energy prices have fallen precipitously over the past couple of months.
  • And my favorite -- dividend yields are very high, and, according to the University of Chicago's John Cochrane, stocks tend to deliver stellar returns over the seven-year period following one when dividend yields are high.

I'm sure you can guess what I'm going to suggest next: If you want to play this market, go after solid, sustainable, dividend-paying stocks.

It's true that dividend-paying stocks are my answer for nearly every market environment. Not only do they hold up better in bear markets and pay you to wait while the economy works out its kinks, but they've also significantly outperformed non-dividend payers over the long haul. Indeed, Jeremy Siegel found that from 1957 through 2003, portfolios invested in the highest-yielding S&P 500 stocks outperformed portfolios in the lowest-yielding by almost five percentage points a year.

My answer for this market
So where should you look for dividend payers in this market? Blue chips like Yum! Brands (NYSE: YUM  ) , PepsiCo (NYSE: PEP  ) , and Coca-Cola (NYSE: KO  ) are all yielding near 3% -- nearly unheard of. Each should experience solid growth over the next half-decade including multiple expansion. Meanwhile, with a dividend that could easily double over the next seven years, cash-rich and globally diverse Philip Morris International (NYSE: PM  ) offers a rock-solid 5.1% yield.

The list goes on. Nearly every energy pipeline operator -- fantastic high-yield, toll-gate businesses -- is yielding above its cost of capital with distributions that, broadly speaking, look solid and sustainable. Incredibly, that's been true lately of even the industry's first-tier names, Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (NYSE: KMP  ) and Enterprise Products Partners (NYSE: EPD  ) among them.

And if, like me, you think oil and gas prices could pop in a big way in the not-so-distant future, you could conservatively play the space with ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM  ) and its fortress-like balance sheet and 2% yield. Sure, Greenpeace may not send you a Christmas card, but your grandkids will thank you.

Obviously ...
Despite last week's market leap, I'm pretty excited about the current opportunities Mr. Market is presenting us with -- and so is our team at Motley Fool Income Investor. With a focus on the long term and buying the right stocks for any market -- dividend-paying stocks -- we're confident that we'll look back at this time and feel proud for having had the nerve to buy in the face of the worst market thrashing of this generation.

Our average recommendation currently yields 7%, and we've outperformed the market by more than three percentage points on average since the newsletter's inception. You can access all of our recommendations, along with our top five ideas for new money now, by joining Income Investor today.

And as a special kicker for those folks who join us now, new members will also get a free copy of the Fool's flagship annual special report, Stocks 2009. The report features eight ideas -- including several dividend payers -- from the Fool's top analysts. Among the picks:

  • A dominant audio specialist recommended by Rex Moore and Fool CEO Tom Gardner.
  • From David Gardner and Tim Beyers, a high-growth scrapper with the potential to revolutionize home entertainment.
  • From Philip Durell and Mike Olsen, a low-cost natural gas producer with strong growth and heady upside.
  • And from us dividend hounds at Income Investor, a fat-yielding oilfield equipment giant poised to pop when the economy turns.

Mr. Market may not be at his most polite right now, but he's still providing some unparalleled opportunities. If you'd like to see which stocks we're recommending to capitalize on that, just click right here.

Fool senior analyst Joe Magyer owns shares of Philip Morris International, but doesn't own shares of any others mentioned in this article -- yet. Coca-Cola is a Motley Fool Inside Value recommendation, while Enterprise Products Partners is an Income Investor recommendation. The Motley Fool's disclosure policy doesn't pay dividends, but it would if it could.


Read/Post Comments (36) | Recommend This Article (180)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 6:27 PM, mgvweddle wrote:

    I'm a subscriber (paid) and would like more meat in the emails instead of the stream of advertisements for other subscriptions. Your article link subject heads sound interesting but just turn into promotional bait for more subscriptions.

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 7:43 PM, wolfhounds wrote:

    I have to agree. All the stocks mentioned here have been written to death by TMF and there are no secrets. More to the point, I passed on renewing Hidden Gems early to get this report free because last years picks are a horror even in this market. Not to mention the new MDP service, at the discounted $499 price (which I got refunded) which managed to pick every dead retailer, and my all time mind twister for a declining global economy - CX.

    A lot less selling and much more thinking will help keep me a subscriber.

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 7:57 PM, molliemd wrote:

    I agree about the lot less selling big time. I'm a charter member and I liked the early years of TMF a lot better than I do now. Too much froth for me!

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 9:36 PM, Brentbb0 wrote:

    The above three comments say it all. The articles here are empty, and in many cases just ads for more MF services. Does MF ever really call it as it is? In my experience, NO.

    This site is a complete waste of time. It almost totally ignores the big picture - macro view. I suggest MS (Morn. Star - paid) It is much, much better for analysis.

    Also, SA (Seek. Alpha - FREE) for great articles.

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 11:03 PM, HAL2008 wrote:

    The challenge in the market today is not so much what is know but what is unknown. There are huge chunks of knowledge about the big players especially in the banking area that need to be studied and reported on more agressively to investors.

    MF should in my opinion be more focused on "digging" into some of this information, as without solid recovery of the banking system there will be ongoing recession. Put another way, when the signs are there that the banks are starting to recover it will help the rest of the market to feel more positive. It's like sale of cement is a great indicator for construction growth potential to recover.

    I also believe that MF does need to have more of a "neutral" focus, be less wordy (not like me here perhaps) and get to the point quicker - less sales.

    Finally I do congratulate MF on keeping investors informed.

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 11:39 PM, FinancialFellow wrote:

    I was able to take away a few things from this article. That said, I think it is relatively common sense at this point that this is a good time to buy stocks. I think it will be hard not to make a decent chunk of change in the stock market over the next 3 -5 years. I agree with the thoughts on dividends but I don't feel like they are the end all be all. I'd be hesitant to invest in any company that continues to be saddled with legacy costs like GM or any large corporation with a workforce dominated by unions. Another good example would be United or American Airlines. Here's an interesting related article: http://financialfellow.com/2008/11/28/pension-plans-ripoff-t...

  • Report this Comment On December 01, 2008, at 11:56 PM, CrazyDiamonds wrote:

    I am new to the market because I believe this is the opportunity of a life time to get in.

    I was hoping there would be more info on stocks in here but I am finding most links I click on are more sales pitches for other TMF services. I am beginning to feel taken......

    Where do I find good stock tips on this site???? I was hoping for more in depth discussion on what are good buys and investments. I don't think 2 picks a month is really very good, it appears you need thousands of dollars to start a portfolio with the picks you provide.

    I am not better informed now than I was before I subscribed, just $99. poorer, glad I got a discount.

    I think if you advertise that you are helping people develop and invest that you need more of that in here. I don't feel that this has really helped me and am disappointed. I was looking forward to having a lot more stock analysis and advice, I feel let down.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 12:29 AM, ur2cool2000 wrote:

    How do I purchase Stocks 2009 without re-subscribing to a service? I'm already a paid subscriber of many years. I cannot find a way to purchase the book like last year. I have to agree, I stopped reading "news" articles on the site years ago, because they are ALL just "upsells" to a particular product. I think McDonald's does the "upsell" better with the old SuperSize. You can at least get fat from it.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 1:03 AM, RCS2rocks wrote:

    Over the last year I have subscribed to SA, MDP then I was offered Pro. Since I have a limited amount of money ( and I've lost a bit ) I asked for a pro-rated refund on MDP and subscribed to Pro. One thing I can testify to is that the Fool has NOT misrepresented themselves in any way.

    I too have noticed that these e-mailed articles are sales pitches. They actually motivate me though and help me remember that it is not that complicated. And they tell me I can do this even working a fulltime job. I don't need a full service broker or a mutual fund.

    Every time I read the comments at the end of these articles I read the same complaints.

    If you don't like reading them you can delete them. And if you don't like the subscriptions TMF offers a money back guarantee. I know they don't want you to be so unhappy.

    I learned a long time ago that I can either be a part of the solution or part of the problem. TMF was represented to me as being a community of investors helping a community of investors. What little time I have to read the Boards I have read other subscribers using their knowledge to help the less knowledgeable, like me, understand and learn.

    I'm here to learn.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 1:31 AM, sibla wrote:

    I had stopped my subscription a few months ago because I felt you do not distinguish between a subscriber and a potential subscriber--I resubscribed two days ago and I find it is even worse than before: you just promote yourself at every line (sick and tired of marvel) or send me to other websites who would then spam me until I change my email. I cannot even find the customary two stocks a months which you recommend. What am I missing? How can get info from you? How can I distinguish between your info and hype? Can someone tell me where the real info is hidden?

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 2:32 AM, GoNuke wrote:

    I agree that MF is pumping out too much hype and not enough useful information. I tire of wading through all the email. I find myself using my Morningstar premium subscription far more.

    When the Gardners wanted us to support the initial bailout package they referred to themselves as our investment advisors. In that capacity they urged us to write to our legislators in support of the program. I agreed with them. The point is; however, that if they feel they are investment advisors why are they spending so much time hyping newsletters.

    A detailed explanation of collateralized debt obligations and the murky practice of credit default swaps wouldn't be amiss. There are 2,500 subprime mortgage backed securities out there with a face value of $900 billion. That is just double the annual defense department budget. Even if the value of those mortgages has dropped in half (which they haven't) the total value of subprime backed securities would still be worth $450 billion or the equivalent of one year of US defense spending.

    The world has thrown well over a trillion dollars at this crisis. Clearly it is not merely a consequence of subprime mortgage lending. The New York Times series of articles entitled the Reckoning have helped explain how the situation emerged but I get that for free and the NYT has never presented itself as my financial advisor.

    Given the extant systemic risk that continues to dog us it behooves financial advisors to pay closer attention to the hazards of investing that are not related to the credit worthiness or competencies of individual companies.

    Systemic risk trumps any business risk associated with an investment. You can't know if it is a good time to invest or not because you do not know the level of systemic risk that still overshadows the stock markets.

    There is an excellent chance that this recession will segue into the period when the baby boomers, like me, start swamping the social security system. 2010 would not be a good time for the US government to have a debt/GDP of 80%.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 3:38 AM, NoMoeMoney wrote:

    Yea, thought the subscription service was a bunch of investing goo-roos and found out they are nothing but video gamers. Why do I have to look elsewhere for small cap advice (gems)? Oh, thats right, they are getting beat-up by the market and need funds from subscribers (or advertising). I might as well let my dog use the market page as his bathroom and pick the stocks with the most pee on it.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 5:03 AM, bbldundee wrote:

    I've been a one-year subscriber to Adviser, Gem and Pro. What a year! If nothing more those subscriptions have generated more offers for Fool "millionaires" groups with limited subscriptions - but no investment history. I didn't bite because of the above responses from others - I don't have time to pick the wheat from the chaf, if there has been any "wheat" this year. And how can there be so many products and not have redundancy? There is. Remember the Berlin Wall: "Slim this service down", fewer products being offered and get to the point of the stock without the fluff to fill the page. And add the perspective of YTD performance to the bugaboo and impossible to refine "since inception" which literaly tells nothing without searching for "inception" and doing some math, a waste given how others report for comparison.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 9:40 AM, ReillyDiefenbach wrote:

    Buffet's first rule: never lose money. Buffet's second rule: never forget rule number one. Any dope can pick stocks during a bull market. When to sell to avoid getting killed is the real skill, one which Motley Fool has yet to master, or even acknowledge as a good idea.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 10:20 AM, misviki wrote:

    I'm not new to MF but just did subscribe to SA.

    So far I find it too complicated, too much hype...and please, stop using the old Marvel etc. as examples. If it doesn't get any better (SA) with better info I'll be out of there.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 11:04 AM, framehorse wrote:

    O.K. MF, you've been told, now please do something about it. I'm tired of bids for more subscriptions. I've done as well without you. Lets have some MEAT in all this broth!

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 11:06 AM, Mary953 wrote:

    Comments above notwithstanding, 30 years ago, I knew what to invest in and how to find the best opportunities. I chose an unknown fund manager (Peter Lynch - Magellan fund) for my first IRA.

    After 30 years away from investing, TMF has brought me back up to speed quickly. Once again I am enjoying the challenge. For me, TMF is a perfect learning tool. And yes, I have made money over the last 12 months by following their recs and my research.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 11:30 AM, Tesser1 wrote:

    Ditto. In years past, the Fool was a welcome relief from the barrage

    of American Express advisors and others looking to make a buck, but now it is just another "buy my advice buy my advice" site. What percent of my holdings would have to go to subscriptions for me to get the news

    I used to get for free?

    The Fool boards are still useful, but the articles and subscriptions feel

    like a constant whining for money.

    Opposite of the old Fool.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 12:51 PM, FinallyIn wrote:

    I completely agree with the comments regarding the Fool expending too much effort promoting its newletters at the expense of insightful content.

    I wrote for the Fool for more than three years. Toward the end of my time there, it was clear a decision was made to push its products rather than provide sound investment advice. I was constantly reminded to add more company and newsletter links, while the focus was taken off of content.

    Although, there is still some good info on the site, particularly for new investors, it no longer has as much counter-analyst analysis (if that makes sense) as it once did.

    I realize the need to make money. However, it's a shame it couldn't find a way to do so without selling out.

  • Report this Comment On December 02, 2008, at 9:32 PM, JDH032749 wrote:

    Thanks to all the post I will delay any subscriptions until I am convinced they add value.

  • Report this Comment On December 03, 2008, at 2:39 PM, WakeJKirk wrote:

    I wish MF would acknowledge what we are saying, or at least some of the authors. I am not subscribing for this sole reason and I'm tired of being pitched subscriptions as well.

  • Report this Comment On December 03, 2008, at 5:17 PM, TMFJoeInvestor wrote:

    Hey there, folks. As always, we appreciate your feedback.

    Let me just say that this article stands on its own merits. I clearly lay out:

    - My thoughts on where the market is headed, accompanied by several pieces of supporting evidence.

    - What style box investors should be looking at. Again, with supporting evidence as to why.

    - And 7 specific stock ideas that I like, including one, PM, that I own.

    Already, you’re walking off having gotten free research and jumping off points for some stocks that I’m pretty keen on. As to my support of the product, I'll say that I was a charter subscriber to Income Investor when it was first released over 5 years ago. I was so enamored with the Fool's approach and mission that I left my job as an investment banker and moved to Alexandria to work here, and I’ve not looked back. I'm extremely proud to be associated with II and The Motley Fool and happy to support them both publicly. If you're not interested in subscribing to our premium offerings, then don't. It is as simple as that.

    Our supporting our newsletter products at the conclusion of some articles is hardly unusual; our most similar competitors follow the same practice. The lines supporting our product at the end of the article are there simply to inform you of our product. Again, if you’re not interested, don’t buy it.

    I appreciate the feedback and sincerely thank you for reading.

    Best,

    Joe

  • Report this Comment On December 04, 2008, at 12:19 AM, sq7marco wrote:

    I have recntly joined and must say I have found this service to be pretty 'weak'. Very hard to get to the 'meatty' stuff with all the ongoing advertising.

    There should be one subscrition for all the information. Hidden gems requires a different subscription that you aren't told upfront about. You do get bombarded once you join.......NOT HAPPY.

  • Report this Comment On December 04, 2008, at 7:45 AM, TicoHombre wrote:

    Good Grief!!! What a bunch of whiners!

    If you don't like the commercials, turn off the T.V. How do you think they pay for the expenses? It's not a charity for crying out loud.

    They do give you good ideas, highlight value, emerging opportunities and help you navigate your way through a very difficult market. What you do with that is up to you. They've helped me look way beyond trading in and out and charting to debt levels, free cash flow, return on equity, etc. The boards are awesome and are reason enough for coming back every day, often several times a day. But again, if you don't like it, utilize your free ticket out of here.

    I appreciate the Fool on may levels. I've subscribed to several of their newsletters and gotten my money back (prorated) every time I've asked without a hint of difficulty.

    Their staff take a lot of jabs and handle them with professionalism and dignity. If you don't like it here, go watch Cramer. But wait, there are commercials...

    I really think this Mr. Market has beat so many people up, everyone's looking for a scapegoat on which to vent their frustrations.

    Respectfully,

    TH

  • Report this Comment On December 05, 2008, at 12:35 PM, jayarctic wrote:

    Does anyone have a good tip on a well known company that mistakenly become a penny stock and is ready to leap?

  • Report this Comment On December 05, 2008, at 1:21 PM, erh7175 wrote:

    I agree with many above. TMF has too much hype about additional subscriber services and too little

    meat on solid ideas. This concept is prevalent throughout the industry but that doesn't mean that it someone cannot be innovative and change it.

    I am a recent subscriber and long time investor and I find TMF to be pretty weak.

  • Report this Comment On December 05, 2008, at 3:56 PM, lloydo14 wrote:

    Too much fluff....... WHERE IS the BEEF

  • Report this Comment On December 05, 2008, at 5:01 PM, stanb2 wrote:

    As to cancellations, I asked to have my subscription cancelled and a refund sent. I never heard from them. I can't stand reading all the garbage to maybe get something at the very end.

  • Report this Comment On December 05, 2008, at 5:57 PM, TMFJoeInvestor wrote:

    Hey Folks,

    I suppose I should reiterate my previous post in this thread, as it seems to have been lost in the shuffle:

    As always, we appreciate your feedback.

    Let me just say that this article stands on its own merits. I clearly lay out:

    - My thoughts on where the market is headed, accompanied by several pieces of supporting evidence.

    - What style box investors should be looking at. Again, with supporting evidence as to why.

    - And 7 specific stock ideas that I like, including one, PM, that I own.

    Already, you’re walking off having gotten free research and jumping off points for some stocks that I’m pretty keen on. As to my support of the product, I'll say that I was a charter subscriber to Income Investor when it was first released over 5 years ago. I was so enamored with the Fool's approach and mission that I left my job as an investment banker and moved to Alexandria to work here, and I’ve not looked back. I'm extremely proud to be associated with II and The Motley Fool and happy to support them both publicly. If you're not interested in subscribing to our premium offerings, then don't. It is as simple as that.

    Our supporting our newsletter products at the conclusion of some articles is hardly unusual; our most similar competitors follow the same practice. The lines supporting our product at the end of the article are there simply to inform you of our product. Again, if you’re not interested, don’t buy it.

    I appreciate the feedback and sincerely thank you for reading.

    Best,

    Joe

  • Report this Comment On December 06, 2008, at 11:45 AM, choppaz4life wrote:

    TMF just doesn't get it. Well, that is not true. Ya'll get it, you just don't care.

    The old school Fools are tired of the useless info., unending buy reccommendations, rarely a sell, and the waterfall of upselling and advertising.

    TMF is obviously counting on new fools to subscribe to their Wise newsletters.

    TMF used to teach Fools how to invest on their own.

    Now, TMF SELLS useless and obvious information to fools. No more educating, just upselling.

    My final lesson from TMF.....

    (although it also should have been obvious information).

    GREED will overcome IDEALS, and GOOD INTENTIONS 100% of the time.

    fool on?? FOOL OFF!!!

    CHOPPAZ4LIFE.

  • Report this Comment On December 08, 2008, at 1:13 PM, LeftBeachFool wrote:

    Just read the article and then wondered why the Web page was so long. Wow! lots of feedback! All I can add for the view of a newbie investor if that I've found the info on MF very helpful and have assisted me greatly in building and planning my portfolio. Having said that, I will admit that i don't much care for the hyping but I understand the need to *present* every opportunity to get more info. As mentioned above, I just don't bite unless something sparks an interest. Having practically no experience in investing, in the past two months I've found that a balance of the MF info., info from my online broker, as well as info from other on-line investing services and new services seems to work for me. (As well as info. directly from the companies / funds I invest in). Time will tell. I will admit that my biggest mistake to date was to buy into an index fund, and I did so mostly based on info. I found in MF. However, in the long term, I feel really comfortable that this same investment will be one of my best picks. In your short, it appears to me that a lot of folks are day traders, and while there is good info to be had, day trading is clearly not what the Fool is all about. I'm still satisfied that foolish investing is a the right way to go but probably looks pretty frustrating from folks that got in years ago and have taken a major hit in the past few months. My Index fund went down almost right away, but, is recovering nicely with the Dow Jones Ind. Cheers all, LeftBeachFool

  • Report this Comment On December 08, 2008, at 2:05 PM, lemoneater wrote:

    I do not yet have a subscription to MF yet I've been able to glean some useful advice. I bought a few shares of ISRG at $99. Right now it is the only stock in my RW portifolio that is still shining green. Yes, it does take time to sift through the articles, but right now I have more time than money. I salute MF for its lack of snobbishness in letting useful crumbs fall. It is the irony of human nature that we rarely appreciate the free things we get. Thank you Motley Fool! May your generosity be rewarded.

  • Report this Comment On December 09, 2008, at 10:09 AM, artman40 wrote:

    I have to say I am disappointed with TMF also. I had Inside Value and have Hidden Gems.

    I dropped Inside Value. Of the stocks I bought from TMF recommendations, all are down. It have 3 stocks still above what I paid for them: Apple, Barrick Gold, and Safety Insurance Group. All of which I bought on my own research.

    The problem I have with TMF recommendations and their +30%, +24% etc claims is that is only true if you by EVERY recommendation. Not everyone is going to do that.

    I have X amount of dollars to invest. Of the 5 Hidden Gems recommendations I bought in the last year, all 5 are HALF what I paid for them.

    I think TMFJoelInvestor misses the point. The majority of comments here are negative. This isn't just a bunch of whiny people.

    This is your customers telling you they are not satisfied with your service.

    LISTEN!

  • Report this Comment On December 14, 2008, at 3:45 AM, esxokm wrote:

    For whatever this is worth, I enjoy the Motley Fool. In my opinion, their writers are smart, and they know investing. I think you can get a lot of great ideas from the company's services. And I am looking forward to the Gardner Bros. new book.

    The Motley Fool is, in all sincerity, one of the best investment sites on the web. Yes, it has its flaws, like every site/product does. It would be awesome if the Fool could strike a deal so that brokerage clients at Scottrade/etc. could receive one free subscription to a service per year. Still, the premium paid for the newsletters is worth it. You get some great research info, and the education value is worth its weight in gold.

  • Report this Comment On December 15, 2008, at 10:22 PM, ronwu wrote:

    Seems funny how these negative posts seem to fuel each other and grow. Perhaps if we spent less time with our hands out, looking for a freebee and more time contributing to what the MF site is all about; investors helping investors, we would all win. Even in this market.

    We can't blame the service solely for the content. Sure who wouldn't like more strong content and more detailed analysis; but everyone has bills to pay at the end of the day.

    So we take the good with the bad and hopefully MF is reading between the lines because there are some good suggestions on how to improve the service and if they do focus mainly on the subcription side it will be a rough ride.

    Check the boards - there are some good content and supported by MF members as well. Outside of that read, share, contribute, constructively criticize or just tune out - any of those options will help to improve the site. Just take a little ownership.

    Frankly, this is new ground for me as of July. Subscriptions to SA and Hidden Gems have not helped being 35% down over the past 5 months with new money invested. But the content is there and the explanation for what to look for and what not to look for has been very good for a new investor. I look forward to becoming more seasoned and can contribute more to the community. I am just keeping my fingers crossed the market is coming back sooner rather than later, or my wife is going to kill me!!

  • Report this Comment On December 28, 2008, at 10:06 PM, lucidguru wrote:

    You can find more 2009 stock recommendations at:

    http://www.gainerstoday.com/UserSearch.aspx?PageNumber=1&...

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 785250, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 9/17/2014 11:39:17 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement