Dude, Where's My Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Car?

Another new road to energy efficiency opened to traffic this week, and one automaker hopes this is just the tip of the iceberg for green machines. If this zero-emissions experiment ever takes hold, we may yet manage to preserve those same icebergs.

I'm not talking about the Toyota (NYSE: TM  ) Prius, with a million units sold. I'm not even referring to the U.S. arrival of Daimler's (NYSE: DAI  ) Smart Car, which covers a respectable 41 miles of highway on a gallon of gas. No, it was Honda (NYSE: HMC  ) that proudly unveiled its latest innovation yesterday: a hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle called the FCX Clarity.

The hydrogen fuel cell is hardly new. It's been around since 1839! The principal challenges to its widespread application in vehicles have related to the fuel itself: the need for an entire fueling infrastructure, the cost of creating and distributing the hydrogen fuel, and the energy (often from natural gas) required to produce the fuel.

Considering that the FCX Clarity is confined to an area of Southern California, where just a handful of hydrogen fuel stations exist, Honda does not appear to have addressed one of the longstanding obstacles. Last year, we similarly saw General Motors (NYSE: GM  ) launch a test fleet of the Chevrolet Equinox FCV in an area that included just New York City and Washington, D.C. With gasoline now topping $4 a gallon, though, the timing and quality of this release from Honda might just provide the spark to get this technology rolling.

As automakers vie for the most attractive fuel-efficiency offerings, another race is on to determine which fuel will burn into the future. Although interest in corn-based ethanol is waning, some promising fuels lie ahead -- for existing vehicles. BP (NYSE: BP  ) is developing biodiesel made from the jatropha plant, while DuPont (NYSE: DD  ) recently announced a big push toward cellulosic ethanol. For hydrogen to beat out these alternative fuels, fuel-cell vehicles must offer attractive performance and pricing, and the infrastructure of filling stations will have to fill out quite quickly.

Luckily for Honda, the FCX Clarity is an engineering achievement that may start to lure some consumer interest. With a range of 280 miles, efficiency equivalent to 74 mpg of gasoline, and favorable reviews, the Clarity is undoubtedly clever. Between this 200-vehicle test fleet and upcoming hybrid versions of the Civic, CR-Z, and Fit, Honda is gunning for pole position in the race for cleaner cars.

Further Foolishness:

If you enjoy staying one step ahead of technological innovations such as the new hydrogen car from Honda, then drive to the Motley Fool CAPS community, where more than 110,000 curious investors like you keep a collective eye on new developments.

Fool contributor Christopher Barker captains yachts and writes about stocks. He can also be found acting foolishly within the CAPS community under the username TMFSinchiruna. He owns no shares in the companies mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


Read/Post Comments (1) | Recommend This Article (2)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2008, at 3:33 PM, pondee619 wrote:

    The FCX Clarity is still, unfortunately, a Jetson's fantasy. What does it cost, where can I fuel it, how is the fuel generated and at what cost and at what continued use of fossile fuels?

    Gasoline and oil, as pointed out by another Fool writer, are still not high enough. How else to explain, as an example, the line of rush hour cars on I-95 south into Manhattan each morning and out in the afternoon. There are rail lines into NYC through Southern NY and Conn. for such a commute.

    Why are the Lincoln and Holland tunnels jammed each rush hour dispite available commuter trains?

    Why the jams on the LIE in lieu of the LIRR?

    I just take the NY examples as I have seen them. I'm sure they exist around the country. There are alternatives. Oil is not yet expensive enough to force people to use them. Once the fossile fuels get high enough, people will use the trains more, abandon their Hummers, attach solar pannels to their roofs, demand wind generators in their areas and otherwise become more energy conservative. Until that time,"Meet the Jetsons"

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 666536, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 10/21/2014 2:13:31 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...

Today's Market

updated 4 hours ago Sponsored by:
DOW 16,399.67 19.26 0.12%
S&P 500 1,904.01 17.25 0.91%
NASD 4,316.07 57.64 1.35%

Create My Watchlist

Go to My Watchlist

You don't seem to be following any stocks yet!

Better investing starts with a watchlist. Now you can create a personalized watchlist and get immediate access to the personalized information you need to make successful investing decisions.

Data delayed up to 5 minutes

Related Tickers

10/20/2014 4:04 PM
HMC $31.61 Up +0.48 +1.54%
Honda Motor Co., L… CAPS Rating: ****
BP $41.16 Down -0.28 -0.68%
BP p.l.c. (ADR) CAPS Rating: ****
DAI $47.42 Down +0.00 +0.00%
Daimler AG (USA) CAPS Rating: *
DD $67.81 Up +0.83 +1.24%
E.I. du Pont de Ne… CAPS Rating: ****
GM $30.34 Up +0.10 +0.33%
General Motors CAPS Rating: **
TM $113.31 Up +3.52 +3.21%
Toyota Motor Corp… CAPS Rating: ***

Advertisement