Apple's Going to Hate Me

Sorry, Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL  ) . I won't be buying a new Mac this year.

It's not that your products have lost their allure. Not completely, anyway. (I'm somewhat dismayed by what TechCrunch's MG Siegler found in testing the new 27-inch iMacs.)

I'm not buying because I don't need to replace my three-and-a-half-year-old MacBook Pro. Google's (Nasdaq: GOOG  ) giving me all the horsepower I need.

On Cloud Mac
I've adopted Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Reader for RSS feeds, even Google Voice, which I use in combination with Skype to save on calls. In each case, I've dumped extraneous software that was crippling my Mac.

Upgrading to Snow Leopard has also helped, but I'm not entirely in the clear. My system's hard drive is slowly dying, furthering the already-strong argument for solid-state storage technology from Intel (Nasdaq: INTC  ) and STEC (Nasdaq: STEC  ) , among others.

My Mac wasn't built for a solid-state drive, but demand for these newer drives has forced down prices for high-capacity magnetic drives from the likes of Seagate Technology (NYSE: STX  ) and Western Digital (NYSE: WDC  ) . That's my next upgrade; a 500-gigabyte drive should cost less than $300 and fit snugly inside my MacBook Pro.

Yet it's not the drive, but rather my adoption of cloud computing applications that has proven transformative. Most of my computing work already occurs in Firefox and Google Chrome; I've just taken it to the next level by substituting Javascript tricks for install-and-upgrade software.

Ahead of the curve
I'm in the minority, apparently. Fortune reports that Kaufman Bros. analyst Shaw Wu says Apple should report a "blowout" first quarter due to outsized iPhone sales around the globe, and "strong momentum" in Mac sales.

But I'm not the only one turning to the cloud to trick out my Mac. Travel writer and photographer Tim Shisler uses Firefox and Gmail in place of Apple's Safari and Mail.

"[I] usually do not have my computer with me most times when traveling so would rather use the browser application since everything is there, and I like the web interface more than Mail," Shisler says.

Musician Jon Siddle says he has a MacBook Pro almost as old as mine, and he's been using Google Apps most of that time. Gmail and Google Calendar are his favored Web productivity tools, followed by Brizzly for social media.

I'm with Shisler and Siddle. I'm still a fan, Apple -- just not enough of a fan to buy a new Mac when I don't need one. Ask me again in three years. My MacBook Pro might finally be ready for retirement then.

Will 2010 see more Mac users turning to the cloud? Please vote in the poll below. You can also leave us a comment to explain your thinking or offer an alternative view.

Apple is a Motley Fool Stock Advisor selection. Google is a Motley Fool Rule Breakers recommendation. Intel is a Motley Fool Inside Value pick. Motley Fool Options has also recommended a position in Intel. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

Fool contributor Tim Beyers had stock and options positions in Apple and a stock position in Google at the time of publication. Check out Tim's portfolio holdings and Foolish writings, or connect with him on Twitter as @milehighfool. The Motley Fool is also on Twitter as @TheMotleyFool. The Fool's disclosure policy is all about winning. Period.


Read/Post Comments (36) | Recommend This Article (30)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:22 PM, Fool wrote:

    Scoop

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:25 PM, Fool wrote:

    What happens if the cloud server crashed? Would you still have your data. I rather have my items with me.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:35 PM, Fool wrote:

    Does this guy know anything about hardware or is he just writting this column to drop buzz words. Just wondering.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:40 PM, Fool wrote:

    I see there's an ad for cloud computing at the bottom of your article.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:45 PM, bicool520 wrote:

    Cloud computing is like depositing money in the bank, if the bank goes kaboom, you better make sure they are FDIC insured. (Offsite) When you need the cash, you need to goto a teller or ATM at the OPEN hours. (Performance) When you have problem with network, that's off hour, then you will be glad if you have a Macbook to at least view your media. (Downtime) Cheers!

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:47 PM, TMFMileHigh wrote:

    Hello Fool,

    Thanks for writing.

    >>Does this guy know anything about hardware or is he just writting this column to drop buzz words. Just wondering.

    Yep, plenty. Been in and around the tech business for more than 15 years now. Been actively picking tech stocks since 2002, with excellent results.

    Mind if I ask you a question in return? How come no profile or CAPS portfolio?

    Foolish best,

    Tim (TMFMileHigh and @milehighfool on Twitter)

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:49 PM, Fool wrote:

    Tim you obviously own google shares and do not have the slightest clue why Apple Users will continue to use Apple Products. I have used both and will be sticking with Apple.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:54 PM, bicool520 wrote:

    Tim, Apple won't hate you. Because you pointed out that you've already own a Macbook Pro for 3.5 years, and won't retire until another 3 years, that shows reliability. And also shows that you love it so much that you kept it that long, otherwise you probably already sold it on eBay. :-) I can't wait for the iSlate thing to come out. Are you considering one? I think it has to be solid state.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:55 PM, TMFMileHigh wrote:

    Fool,

    >>Tim you obviously own google shares ...

    Right. We call that a disclosure line:

    >>Fool contributor Tim Beyers had stock and options positions in Apple and a stock position in Google at the time of publication.

    I've used both, too. Still do. But I recognize that some Apple products aren't as good as others. Apple Mail is lightweight when compared to Gmail.

    >> ... do not have the slightest clue why Apple Users will continue to use Apple Products.

    (Grins.) Like I haven't heard that one before. Thanks for the chuckle.

    Foolish best,

    Tim (TMFMileHigh and @milehighfool on Twitter)

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 4:58 PM, TMFMileHigh wrote:

    Hello bicool520,

    Thanks for writing.

    >>Because you pointed out that you've already own a Macbook Pro for 3.5 years, and won't retire until another 3 years, that shows reliability.

    True, it's a great machine. And I do love it.

    >>Are you considering one? I think it has to be solid state.

    I'd love to consider one, but I'm not sure our 2010 budget will allow for purchasing an iSlate -- or whatever it ends up being called.

    Foolish best,

    Tim (TMFMileHigh and @milehighfool on Twitter)

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:18 PM, kpinvest wrote:

    "What happens if the cloud server crashed? Would you still have your data. I rather have my items with me."

    This has always been my favorite argument. No one really seems to mind if the data suddenly becomes unavailable. Even worse, if it gets compromised. Remember when this happened to Twitter? Just to think, Google is working at hosting your medical records. They also own AdSense, and the data miners go wild. All of this, and no one really seemed too bothered by this prospect several years ago when it was happening.

    Saying anything disparaging against Apple here is always dangerous. I owned a Mac for several months, but the limitations of software just soured me to the concept. For anyone who suggests buying Parallels or BootCamp to run a Windows OS, why buy a Mac in the first place? I'm very happy for their 4% market share, and all of the art students that rejoice their productivity.

    The iPhone and the iPod are things that Apple has gotten right and has been rewarded for. Personally, I hope they lose market share as quickly as they've gotten it. There was a rather cleaver article on another site that compared Apples iPhone users to people with Stockholm syndrome. Just food for thought.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:21 PM, johns33333 wrote:

    "Does this guy know anything about hardware or is he just writting this column to drop buzz words. Just wondering."

    Error 1: STEC make SSD drives for high end enterprise systems, and not for consumer systems and certainly not for laptops as this author claims. Error 2: cost of a 500GB SSD is 5x more expensive than this author quotes; and a HDD is 10x cheaper to boot. Based on these two blatant errors, this author has little knowledge of the peripheral storage industry; thus his arrogance as a self proclaimed "expert" makes me doubt if he really knows anything at all.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:23 PM, Fool wrote:

    I call false dichotomy.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:23 PM, marv08 wrote:

    Hm, the logic behind moving to cloud computing and needing a bigger hard drive for that might escape me, but anyhow: you can easily find 500GB laptop drives for far less than 300 bucks, less than 100 bucks actually...

    I upgrade my MacBook Pro (and PowerBooks before) annually, and processing power is certainly the least important point here (even the slowest 2.26 GHz Core 2 Duo they offer now is faster than what most people will need - even with regular contemporary desktop software). Still, if you add up all the benefits of the newer models (up to 8GB RAM, larger glass trackpad with gestures, better keyboard, LED backlight with higher max. brightness, much higher gamut panels, unibody, OpenCL compatible graphic chips, extremely improved battery life, Firewire 800, SD Card Reader) when compared to those from 2006, there are plenty of reasons to upgrade. And it might still be several years or decades before we will edit images and videos in the cloud. With all the data privacy scandals, outages and data loss (Sidekick et al) piling up, acceptance of the cloud might be a lot slower than analysts want to make us believe. Telcos and ISPs struggle to bring broadband to non-urban areas and there are new cases of service discrimination or traffic shaping popping up all the time... Before all these issues are sorted out - the cloud will not replace nothing.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:31 PM, WoodyDog1400 wrote:

    Apple doesn't hate you, they loooveeee you. Already got your money on the first mac. Steve say's thanks..

    And they will get it again this yr with the "islate" or whatever it becomes. It may not be in your budget, but you will still buy it, how do you think we started this little recession thing? And how are you gonna write tech articles if your competition has the toy you don't have. You won't be able to resist. You can hook your ipod, iphone, and mac up to it.. Don't tell me "The Street" will be the first to write about it..

    Long APPL

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:33 PM, WoodyDog1400 wrote:

    And as far as all of us trusting our personal info in the "clouds"... right now we can't even keep bombs out of underwear in the "clouds"... Trust your own hardware.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:48 PM, TMFMileHigh wrote:

    Hello johns33333,

    >>Error 1: STEC make SSD drives for high end enterprise systems, and not for consumer systems ...

    Please give STEC more credit. The Mach 4 drive is different from the Zeus, and is intended for a variety of devices. More here:

    http://www.stec-inc.com/product/mach4.php

    And here:

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-9956136-64.html

    >>Error 2: cost of a 500GB SSD is 5x more expensive than this author quotes.

    My apologies for not being more clear. I'm referring to a 500 Gb magnetic drive. Will probably be from Seagate. $300 is about what I'll pay if I ask the guys at Mac Outlet to do a rush install. Haven't decided whether I want to take the time to crack open the machine myself.

    Thanks for writing and Foolish best,

    Tim (TMFMileHigh and @milehighfool on Twitter)

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 5:54 PM, TMFMileHigh wrote:

    Hi marv08,

    >>Hm, the logic behind moving to cloud computing and needing a bigger hard drive for that might escape me ...

    That's a fair point. The price difference between 500 Gb and 250 or even 200 Gb is negligible where I am. Since I plan to keep the machine for some years, I'm going with the largest capacity.

    >>Before all these issues are sorted out - the cloud will not replace nothing.

    Agreed. I don't assert that the cloud will replace laptops or desktops, but it might slow the upgrade cycle.

    This, in effect, is what happened to the auto industry. Improve the car enough, and shoppers feel less compelled to upgrade.

    Apple has made a great machine; Google has excellent, usable services. No need for my MBP to retire early.

    Foolish best,

    Tim

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 6:34 PM, willengage wrote:

    I too have a 3 and one half year old MacBook Pro. I am using a "partly cloudy" system syncing my Nokia E71 to my laptop and to Google. That way I have a back up should any two of the three links fail. However, the reason that I am commenting is that I don't see how "using the cloud" is a reasonable argument for putting off the purchase of another computer. I am in the same boat as the writer: I will not be buying a new MacBook Pro anytime soon. My computer is very fast. The upgrade to Snow Leopard has improved my computer's performance. I do not need a new computer right now. However, it is not because I have found alternatives to Apple's iCal and Mail applications. By this logic the writer implies that his computer is too slow to run them and is only able to forgo purchasing a new computer because Google lets him do these things online. This is ridiculous, of course. With this in mind, I have to wonder what the point of this article really was. Did he have to meet a deadline and just spit out a bunch of nonsense to fill the page. that seems probable. I would like the last few minutes of my life back!

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 6:49 PM, CascadeHead wrote:

    Can some tell me why this amazing stock that everyone has as an outperform is rated only 3 stars?

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 7:24 PM, jlbanker wrote:

    I love cloud computing. I use both Apple's MobileMe and Google Apps. I work for a Real Estate company with 450 agents and we are getting many of them moved over to cloud computing. It has really made things so much easier.

    I have 3 computers plus an iphone and I no longer have to try to figure out which computer a file was saved on.

    I too am happy with my MacBook and with cloud computing I am still very much happy with my old G5 iMac. For what I need it for it still feels like a new computer.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 7:25 PM, lutece7 wrote:

    I don't understand why TMFMilehigh thinks that Apple is not into Cloud Computing. Mobile Me is cloud computing. And I here that iWork is going to go the cloud computing way very soon.

    I have a 27 inch iMac and I love it. No problems with it.

    Besides, even if Apple doesn't have as good of products as Google, (if), people are still flocking to Apple and buying Apple. And there is always going to be the next "big thing" at Apple, to revolutionize the industry. THAT is why you should have bought Apple stock. To make money. I have.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 7:34 PM, Fool wrote:

    My daughter brought her old MacBook Pro home for Christmas and told me that she thinks she needed a new computer --- too slow.

    I dropped in 2GB of memory and installed a 500GB hard drive, then upgraded her to Snow Leopard. The machine runs like it did when new.

    Those machines came with 512 MB of memory and, if memory serves, an 80 GB hard drive. It isn't that the machine is slow, it just needs to be brought up to current memory standards.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 9:05 PM, Fool wrote:

    To the Editor, Don't write articles for the sake of writing.

    No where else i can find stupid articles as i find them on your fool site.

    Glad you lived up to your standards and letting people know that Fool.com is run by fools, articles are written by fools.

  • Report this Comment On December 30, 2009, at 11:00 PM, jimdog wrote:

    I am in 100% agreement. I have Dropbox, and I have MobileMe. Dropbox is a godsend. I am in the throes of writing a Baldrige Award application -- fifty pages of exacting writing. I am at it day and night, because I have a 60-hour-per-week "Day Job". I have to write when time permits -- at weird hours, in weird places. My Macbook unibody plastic 13" machine is just fine, thank you, with Office for Mac and The Cloud. It can edit my chapters as well as my PC at work. Snowed in at a motel in Wisconsin, my Christmas trip cut short by freezing rain and snow that made the Interstate treacherous, I was able to make very productive use of what otherwise would have been a dismal time of waiting out the storm. When it came time to polish and cross-reference back at "the office", it was as though all the work had been done there.

    I don't go anywhere without my "cheap" MacBook.

  • Report this Comment On December 31, 2009, at 12:32 AM, adamsaf wrote:

    Dear Mr. Beyers

    I must disagree with a number of points in your column and am somewhat baffled by terminology used in your writing. I realize everyone likes to use "Cloud" computing to bump up interest in what they are talking about. However in all honesty your computer is still limited by how fast it can run your internet browser of choice. As that browser and it's java components get more cumbersome your computer will run them more slowly. As a knowledgeable industry insider you should be aware that Microsoft word and Apple mail programs are very small and take up less than half of the memory resources of (in my case) Firefox running google docs. (850mb vs 50 mb of memory). How this would help you delay buying a new Mac is beyond me.

    I would also note to you that writing in a local application has a definite benefit in that if you are traveling you always have access to your writing.

    Thirdly, If you fancy the "Cloud" so much, why on earth do you need a larger hard drive, the whole point is store information remotely to ensure availability of access and ensure a backup of data. Storing large amounts of data locally defeats many of the benefits of using online services.

    So all in all I just don't see the point in your article. Who doesn't love free software (thanks google!) and who wants to replace their computer "when they don't need one"

    PS what extraneous hardware was crippling your mac?

  • Report this Comment On December 31, 2009, at 12:34 AM, adamsaf wrote:

    Dear Mr. Beyers

    I must disagree with a number of points in your column and am somewhat baffled by terminology used in your writing. I realize everyone likes to use "Cloud" computing to bump up interest in what they are talking about. However in all honesty your computer is still limited by how fast it can run your internet browser of choice. As that browser and it's java components get more cumbersome your computer will run them more slowly. As a knowledgeable industry insider you should be aware that Microsoft word and Apple mail programs are very small and take up less than half of the memory resources of (in my case) Firefox running google docs. (850mb vs 50 mb of memory). How this would help you delay buying a new Mac is beyond me.

    I would also note to you that writing in a local application has a definite benefit in that if you are traveling you always have access to your writing.

    Thirdly, If you fancy the "Cloud" so much, why on earth do you need a larger hard drive, the whole point is store information remotely to ensure availability of access and ensure a backup of data. Storing large amounts of data locally defeats many of the benefits of using online services.

    So all in all I just don't see the point in your article. Who doesn't love free software (thanks google!) and who wants to replace their computer "when they don't need one"

    PS what extraneous hardware was crippling your mac?

  • Report this Comment On December 31, 2009, at 1:58 PM, theelysium wrote:

    Apple Mail totally out weighs Gmail!

    Do you even know how to use Apple Mail?

    I would like to point out that you are not comparing apples to apples. Apple Mail is an app and Gmail is a service with a web interface. You should be comparing MobileMe to Gmail it would make a better comparison. Gmail currently does not make anything that compares to Apple Mail!

    You can IMAP Gmail's cloud into Apple Mail so you can use your Mac to check your email in the same manor as your browser. When you do that data will remain the same, because it will mirror you Gmail's web interface.

    MobileMe's pic & video sharing, personal web site, back to your Mac & shared calendar completely dominates the design and flow of Googles'. You should get yourself a MobileMe account and compare them. Currently the iWork looks better, but it's features lack what Google Docs has. I am sure they will add features and iWork.com will soon be better then Google Docs.

    Apple's equals class, easy  and modern.

    Googles' equals clunky, ugly, difficult and full of ads!

  • Report this Comment On January 02, 2010, at 6:07 AM, trurl9 wrote:

    Tim, I wouldn't be so quick to turn over my data to anybody's cloud.

    Leaving comments on Motley Fool's boards leaves a relatively permanent way to track someone's commentary. It would be relatively easy to attach Fool I.D. to real I.D. as many end user agreements stipulate that companies will cooperate fully with law enforcement officials.

    Moreover, Fool commenters might not be aware how long their data will be retained or what it will be used for. How many read and understand end-user agreements?

    What happens if the rules and policies are abruptly and retroactively changed? Not saying Fool or any other company WOULD do that but we all know it CAN happen. It happens more easily when the technology is already being used.

    Google appears to be on a quest to capture all useful information in the world. Google and its ilk are becoming the gate keepers, the big brothers of the corporate-run world depicted in Rollerball.

    Should you leave your data and intellectual property in Google's care there's a chance it might be used by Google for its benefit regardless of whatever they write in their "privacy policy".

    When Eric Schmidt says only the guilty should worry whether their information is being tracked by Google, I'm being sent a warning. Use Google's "free" services with great caution.

    Also, how many cloud operators back up their customers' data or merely duplicate it to provide the semblance of archive?

    What happens if you annoy Google and they disallow you access to your data?

    What happens when cyber criminals crack Google and steal, manipulate, fold, spindle, mutilate or infect your data?

    This is not a criticism of what you wrote, these are questions that occurred to me in the time it took me to read your article. Thank you for the thought-provoking tweak.

    Do no harm.

    Jon-a-than

    THX1138

    Winston Smith

  • Report this Comment On January 02, 2010, at 12:05 PM, JimA4Media wrote:

    You may want to buy a new Macintosh when you see the iTablet or iSlate or whatever it is called introduced in 25 days. It will be SSD based and will utilize Apple's own Cloud Computing feature that has been available for years. .Mac

    As for putting a SSD in a Macintosh, as long as it has a SATA interface, it should work the same as a normal hard drive.

    Also, maybe you missed the fact that Apple is building a 500,000 square foot server farm in North Carolina. It is probably going to server up iTunes music, video, movies, books, magazines, and simple stuff like text and graphics from iWorks.

    Jim

  • Report this Comment On January 02, 2010, at 4:58 PM, cmm3 wrote:

    Well, computer giants will grow and need help from Taiwan's semiconductor industry. http://eafepro.com/content/taiwan-investments

  • Report this Comment On January 03, 2010, at 12:48 AM, Fool wrote:

    "Firefox running google docs. (850mb vs 50 mb of memory"

    I'm watching chrome run google docs at under 11mb, with four tabs open to other sites including this. You should probably try closing some of those naughty sites.

  • Report this Comment On January 04, 2010, at 3:20 PM, FoolGrande wrote:

    Cloud computing is nice, but I don't think it's a cure-all or even a paradigm shift that spells the death of the PC... It really is nothing more than a slightly more "secure" version of Mainframe Computing -- the same paradigm that Personal Computers rose out of.... As far as Macs are concerned, one of the reason I buy Macs is for their useable lifespan. I have always had Macs for five to ten years before I start looking for a replacement. Whether I start using Cloud Computing apps or not is not going to determine my hardware purchase. Further, as a developer (and artist), Cloud Computing to me affords only one thing: the ability to off-load hardware support to someone else. Personally, I like to keep my code, intellectual property, and such under wraps and in my control, and not in reach of potential thieves... There are also times I would appreciate NOT being connected to an internet or some other utility and still be able to use my apps. Finally, Cloud Computing is based on a subscription/utility model. I despise having to pay a subscription for anything. It didn't work for music (how many subscription music sites do you know that are flourishing?) -- why would it work for something like, e.g. Photoshop? Anyone who's ever done a cost comparison of Lease vs. Buy can tell you how bad Leasing is financially for the consumer of the service. If anything, Cloud Computing based on a subscription, lease, or pay-per-use model will just be another option in the computing world, it can not replace the PC in any stretch of the imagination unless we decide to place ALL intellectual property in the hands of Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, and any other big business that can afford to set up large datacenters... That would kinda defeat the "1984 not like 1984" promise of the Mac, then, wouldn't it?

  • Report this Comment On January 05, 2010, at 12:56 PM, 0gre wrote:

    For me and my family longevity has been one of the biggest reasons we've bought Macs. I'm not sure why this is bad news, more and more people are discovering that with a decent OS and well made devices you don't need to throw out your system every 2-3 years.

    This isn't a dis-advantage, it's an advantage. Your comments about cloud computing make me wonder why Apple isn't making a lower cost/ lower horsepower laptop to leverage this. An Apple Netbook would be a great device, I'm not sure why we haven't seen one yet. Maybe they will release one along with the tablet? I hope.

  • Report this Comment On January 05, 2010, at 3:40 PM, muddlinthrough wrote:

    THIS really amused me:

    <i>I'd love to consider one, but I'm not sure our 2010 budget will allow for purchasing an iSlate -- or whatever it ends up being called. </i>

    Coupled with

    <i> Yep, plenty. Been in and around the tech business for more than 15 years now. Been actively picking tech stocks since 2002, with excellent results. </i>

    no play money for a $1500 'don't need it but gotta have it tech toy?'

    (your wife must be my wife's long-lost-twin.)

  • Report this Comment On January 05, 2010, at 3:40 PM, muddlinthrough wrote:

    aha. no <HTML tag> need apply, looks like.

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