R.I.M. Needs This PlayBook

Research In Motion (Nasdaq: RIMM  ) did the right thing by adding a tablet computer to its lineup of products aimed at the enterprise market, say analysts.

The Mississauga, Ont.-based company officially introduced the PlayBook, a tablet computer, at its Developer's Conference this week. The device has a seven-inch screen, will use a tablet version of the Blackberry operating system and will be aimed at the enterprise segment.

"I think it was the right move," Mark McKechnie, analyst at Gleacher and Company, said. "It's marketing 101, protect your capital. For RIM, that is enterprise, secure email and secure corporate management."  

RIM says the device, which runs on a 1 GHz dual-core processor, supports true symmetric multiprocessing. Recently acquired QNX has been called into duty to provide the operating system architecture. It also supports video conferencing capabilities.

The first generation of the device runs on Wi-Fi internet and does not have cellular connectivity. However, analysts say this is not a downside as it just indicates that RIM is in fact aiming at the enterprise customer base.http:/img.ibtimes.com/www/site/us/images/1px.gif

"It saves consumers from another data subscription cost with the carrier," Matt Thornton, analyst at Aviation Securities, said. "It also lowers the cost of materials. And for the enterprise segment, it makes it a much cheaper, worthwhile device. It's clear they are going towards the enterprise."

The device is also enterprise-ready because it's compatible with the BlackBerry Enterprise Server. By using a Bluetooth, users can connect content from their BlackBerry smartphone to the PlayBook tablet. This capability allows IT managers to deploy the BlackBerry PlayBook to non-present employees without worrying about all the security and manageability issues.

The PlayBook's size and weight, which is less than the iPad, also impressed analysts. RIM says it weighs less than a pound at 0.9 lbs, and it has less than half of an inch of thickness.

While analysts liked the move and the device, they cautioned that the enterprise market for tablets may not be that big. Since tablets are still in the early stages of development, it is unclear whether or not people will actually buy them for business purposes. Yet despite these concerns, most believe this was the right move for RIM in the long run.

"This is a step in the right direction," McKechnie said. "They needed to hit this tablet space. I've said it before, real men have tablets. It was important that RIM fight back in this space."

International Business Times, The Global Business News Leader

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Read/Post Comments (5) | Recommend This Article (3)

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Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On September 29, 2010, at 4:21 PM, sk8ertor wrote:

    I will be buying one!

  • Report this Comment On September 29, 2010, at 8:12 PM, isellwireless wrote:

    Dear InfoThatHelp:

    I am concerned that Apple would be taken over by Asia and be Asianizarion (sic) because their production is outsourced in China. Made In, Assembled, Potatoe, Potato.

    Love,

    Your #1 Fan

    PS- Are you really educated. I am assuming at this point you're not.

  • Report this Comment On September 29, 2010, at 11:23 PM, sandwichx wrote:

    Playbook also has HD video playback and flash for youtube. Apple doesn't.

  • Report this Comment On September 29, 2010, at 11:55 PM, BR14 wrote:

    InfoThatHelp, most electronic components are made in Asia - China or otherwise.

    That's largely a question of labour costs. i.e. an economic decision rather than ownership or tech.

    Even companies that assemble elsewhere, (including RIM and Apple), utilise components manufactured in Asia.

    "Is Rim capable of handling two completely incompatible operating systems to go head to head with the completely seamless Apple ecosystem spanning from the iPod Shuffle to the big iron iMac servers running OSX Server with tens of gigabytes in ram, multi-cores powerful Intel Xeon or higher CPU with gigaflops of processing power, and billions of terabytes of storage?"

    Why not. It's just software.

    Is OSX the same as iOS? If so how come iOS didn't have multi-tasking when it was launched.

    The Playbook will run Flash as will BlackBerry devices shortly, and a custom JVM has been developed, so BlackBerry apps will probably run pretty well seamlessly on the Playbook, though why you'd want to run apps with the iPhone form factor on an iPad or the equivalent RIM apps is beyond me.

    Check the Playbook video. You'll actually be able to use your BlackBerry keyboard and see the keystrokes on the Playbook with both devices having synchronised displays.

    Apple and RIM are two entirely different companies that manufacture one or two products in the same market segment. And even then there really isn't much overlap.

    Give it up. The negativity toward RIM is out of date.

  • Report this Comment On October 01, 2010, at 4:25 PM, Aeoran wrote:

    Thus spake @InfoThatHelp:

    "This Playbook of Rim is designed and manufactured by Taiwan, not by Rim."

    This seems to be a completely unfounded speculation. And the rest of the comment is based off this speculation.

    Note that a single fallacy at the beginning of a logical thought process can contaminate and irreparably damage the rest of the thesis. Exhibit 'A' above.

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