Jackup Drilling's Still a Drag

Last October, we looked at the soggy state of the jackup drilling market, as reflected in the fleet status of industry titan Transocean (NYSE: RIG  ) . This led me to suggest that Fools avoid operators Hercules Offshore (Nasdaq: HERO  ) and Seahawk Drilling (Nasdaq: HAWK  ) . Hercules is down around 40%, while Seahawk has shed roughly 70% of its value since then.

Life hasn't gotten any easier for shallow-water contract drillers over the past 13 months, with the BP (NYSE: BP  ) oil spill causing regulatory shockwaves and newly built rigs crowding an already oversupplied marketplace. Let's see what moves Transocean has made lately, and what the company's actions tell us about the current state of affairs.

In a September presentation, Transocean reported that it had "stacked" two dozen jackups. This means the rigs are not fully crewed or being actively marketed. As of mid-October, the company had 65 jackups in its fleet, so 37% of those rigs had no near-term prospects for work. A further two jackups were idle, and one of them has since been stacked.

In the same presentation, Transocean identified 12 more rigs that were working, but whose contracts were expiring before year-end. By my count, five are still working (or scheduled to, weather permitting), three are idle, and four are stacked. This suggests that fully half of Transocean's jackups are not working today.

This is all fairly grim. In case you're eyeing a sharp object on your desk, however, I will point out that there are still bright spots among so-called "high-specification" jackup rigs.

Transocean just recently agreed to purchase a fancy new jackup under construction by a Sembcorp Marine shipyard in Singapore. The price tag is $195 million, which is nearly 2.5 times the entire enterprise value of Seahawk, which has 20 "commodity" jackup rigs. This purchase follows a similar one involving Ensco (NYSE: ESV  ) and Diamond Offshore (NYSE: DO  ) this past summer. These high-spec rigs, typically capable of drilling 30,000- to 35,000-foot wells in water depths of 350 or 400 feet, can still command strong dayrates, as they're much scarcer than the masses of standard jackups built in the boom of the early 1980s.

It's for this reason that Rowan Industries' (NYSE: RDC  ) future is so different than that of its lesser jackup-toting peers. Trading right around tangible book value, Rowan shares are hardly expensive, but I would probably wait for a more opportunistic entry point. As for Seahawk and Hercules, I think the former is an interesting, albeit risky speculation at the current sub-$9 share price, while I wouldn't touch the latter debt-laden driller with a 10-foot pole.

Fool contributor Toby Shute doesn't have a position in any company mentioned. Check out his CAPS profile or follow his articles using Twitter or RSS. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Fool owns shares of Ensco and Transocean. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


Read/Post Comments (2) | Recommend This Article (5)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On November 18, 2010, at 11:45 AM, pfvll wrote:

    Would you really call Transocean's new rig from Sembcorp Marine a "jackup" ? It's designed for deep water drilling, for which jackups are, by definition, unsuitable.

    That said, I can't figure out why so many jackups are sitting around unused just now. There are plenty of shallow water fields around the world where jackups could be accessing $80+ per barrel oil. Or perhaps the oil companies would rather keep the flow restricted to keep the price up?

  • Report this Comment On November 18, 2010, at 3:11 PM, joblock wrote:

    ComparingTransocean to Hercules is like comparing Microsoft to AT&T, because they both have software.

    Hercules main business right now, is operating a fleet of lift boats, which are, according to their last conference call, nearly 100% utilized. Hercules is in the Gulf of Mexico, and has just begun to operate smaller offshore rigs outside of GOM. They are a blue collar company, and most of their income comes from subcontract work for other drillers and producing oil and natural gas companies. They service platforms, and provide serveral services for transportation of equipment and personnel logistics.

    Transocean is an engineering company. They do E&P. They are more a white collar company. They own rigs, but they are mamoth structures designed to drill in conditions that Hercules can't spell. The two don't really overlap.

Add your comment.

DocumentId: 1373194, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 7/29/2014 12:49:22 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement