5 Stocks I Found in the Bargain Bin

I'll admit it, when the market tanks, I'm not crazy about the red-washing of my portfolio. However, when stocks are falling day after day after day, I do get pretty excited that I may turn up some interesting bargains.

The majority of my investing sticks to the basics -- that is, finding great companies, buying them at reasonable prices, and holding on to them to benefit from their superior economics over time. And to be sure, when the market falls, there are better prices available on a lot of these great companies.

But as I've written before, I also maintain a portfolio of horribly battered bargain stocks -- that is, stocks that have been dragged all the way down to around half or less of their reported book value. Why would I bother with this? For one, value-investing forefather Benjamin Graham was fond of buying stocks based on low prices in relation to balance sheet metrics. If that's not enough, academic power-duo Eugene Fama and Kenneth French showed through extensive research that stocks with a high book-to-market ratio (the inverse of price-to-book) continually beat the rest of the market.

With that in mind, I found five new stocks by rummaging through the bargain bin.

Company

Market Cap

Price-to-Book Value Multiple

Deutsche Bank (NYSE: DB  )

$33.7 billion

0.50

ArcelorMittal (NYSE: MT  )

$27.5 billion

0.48

E*TRADE Financial (Nasdaq: ETFC  )

$2.4 billion

0.50

Endurance Specialty Holdings (NYSE: ENH  )

$1.4 billion

0.53

ReneSola (NYSE: SOL  )

$169 million

0.27

Source: S&P Capital IQ.

Let's dive right in for a closer look at these five laggards.

Deutsche Bank
Am I betting against a Greece-sparked eurozone meltdown? Possibly. Or perhaps I'm just betting on the market's apparent view that Deutsche Bank is in line to report tens of billions in losses (far more than what it recognized during the worst of the financial meltdown). Or maybe I'm just hot on the idea that, just like the U.S. wasn't about to let Citigroup (NYSE: C  ) go all supernova, Germany will be ready to stand behind its behemoth bank. Pick your poison -- in any case I like the risk-reward on Deutsche Bank at this price.

ArcelorMittal
Last month I said that ArcelorMittal was at the very top of my buy list. And that was anything but hot air -- the stock is now part of my personal portfolio. In short, my reasoning was that ArcelorMittal is a great company with significant scale advantages and has a great leader who owns a significant stake in the company. Oh, and the stock is really, really cheap whether you're looking at book value -- as we are here -- or even more stringent measures like price-to-average 10-year earnings. Unlike most of the stocks I find in the bargain bin, this is one that I think can have a home in either a bargain-stock portfolio, or a portfolio of high-quality companies.

E*TRADE Financial
Talk about a fall from grace. From a shareholder's perspective, the distance that E*TRADE has traveled from where it was pre-crisis and where it is today can only be measured in light years. But what about a customer's perspective? Anecdotal evidence can often be misleading, but from the view of at least one customer (yours truly), the company delivers a very good experience that is worth paying commission rates that are decidedly not the lowest out there. Were the stock priced as if investors had any confidence in the company, I probably wouldn't be interested, but at this price I might be willing to bet that either the company gets its act together -- even a bit -- or a buyer is willing to step in for what is still a strong brand in the space.

Endurance Specialty Holdings
Endurance is not one of my very favorite specialty property and casualty insurers (I recently took a look at them here). However, it's a fine insurer and is even cheaper than those other cheap specialty P&C insurers. Investors who aren't fans of some occasional big swings in the bottom line may not fancy Endurance because insuring against big risks can mean big financial swings -- in the first six months of this year the Japanese earthquake and tsunami; the Christchurch, New Zealand, earthquake; the Queensland, Australia, floods; and tornadoes in the U.S. added a whopping $251 million to the company's loss expenses, and it was unprofitable over that period. Over long periods of time, though, I think these guys know what they're doing and so picking up shares at nearly half off book value is a steal.

ReneSola
I dig solar. I really do. But I have a problem investing in the space because, like other young, upcoming industries, there's a long way to go for all the companies involved and there will inevitably be new companies coming in that upset the status quo and steal market share, while companies that can't keep up will be culled. Technologies will change, fat will be trimmed, and while the industry as a whole will move forward, not everyone involved will. In the world of Internet search, do you think users of Yahoo!, AskJeeves, and Alta Vista saw Google moving in to gobble up the entire sector?

That said, I'm scratching my head over the valuation levels that investors have pushed solar stocks to lately. I will admit I have been long and wrong on ReneSola in my Motley Fool CAPS portfolio -- and taken quite a hit to my score as a result -- thanks to my view that it would be a good bet in general. I made that call back in June of 2009, when the stock was trading at a premium to book value. Now, with the stock trading at a small fraction of its book value, a lot less has to go right for investors to make out.

Thumbs-up!
Rather than simply leaving it there, I'm going to add the stocks not already in my CAPS portfolio -- Deutsche Bank and Endurance Specialty -- to my portfolio to track how these picks do over time.

More interested in high dividend yields than the bargain bin? Check out our special report "13 High-Yielding Stocks to Buy Today." My fellow Fools brought together a baker's dozen of stocks (to help you diversify) in many solid, easy-to-understand, dividend-paying businesses. Click here to claim a free copy of this popular report.

The Motley Fool owns shares of Google, Citigroup, and Yahoo!. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Yahoo!, Google, and Endurance Specialty Holdings. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.

Fool contributor Matt Koppenheffer owns shares of ArcelorMittal, but does not have a financial interest in any of the other companies mentioned. You can check out what Matt is keeping an eye on by visiting his CAPS portfolio, or you can follow Matt on Twitter @KoppTheFool or Facebook. The Fool's disclosure policy prefers dividends over a sharp stick in the eye.

 


Read/Post Comments (11) | Recommend This Article (46)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2011, at 4:22 PM, kariku wrote:

    Long MT, plan to buy more in November or so, once the Greece BS is (hopefully) over.

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2011, at 5:19 PM, xetn wrote:

    " Or maybe I'm just hot on the idea that, just like the U.S. wasn't about to let Citigroup (NYSE: C ) go all supernova, Germany will be ready to stand behind its behemoth bank. Pick your poison -- in any case I like the risk-reward on Deutsche Bank at this price."

    There is a very big difference; Germany cannot print trillions of Euros to bail out their banks like the Fed can/did with C and BAC, etc. Sure there is the EU version of the Fed but just how many country banks can it bail out? Personally, I believe the Euro going to collapse. (Mayby the USD will as well.) With the whole world betting on some way to bail out the PIIGS, how long do you suppose the Germans and other northern EU countries will pony up while bleeding their citizens?

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2011, at 5:32 PM, mikecart1 wrote:

    MT is the only one on your list that I support. Steel is guaranteed to go up in the future like oil. Steel is needed everywhere unless you want to watch the planet infrastructure fail slowly. The other 4 I disagree with. E-Trade especially. Their commission fees are some of the highest and you don't get much for it. Paying more for commission for the same stock trade makes no sense. If you are using the info only from an online broker, you should probably stop trading. E-Trade is inevitable to level off and die off like Monster.

    MT all the way!

    ETFC no way!

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2011, at 7:21 PM, colleran wrote:

    Dang, Matt, I need more money to invest in all these companies selling at such low values, especially MT.

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2011, at 10:33 PM, maiday2000 wrote:

    Most solar demand is due in part to subsidies provided by governments who are going broke. Solar is five times more expensive than fossil fuels, and "all of a sudden" no one is talking about "peak oil" anymore. Oh, and by the way, we are like the Saudi Arabia for natural gas.

    I am sure you can get a bounce in some of these rightfully beaten down solar names, but as an investment? Umm...no.

  • Report this Comment On October 11, 2011, at 8:59 AM, tjm0258 wrote:

    I'll stand behind E-Trade. I've had excellent service from them for the last 6 years. I'm a small trader with an average of 5-10 trades a month. but if I put a limit order in to purchase at $60 I usually pay $59.95 -59.98, 98% of the time, where my other brokers get executed at whtever the limit price is, buy or sell. $9 per trade well worth the extra $1 per trade. If your losing money on the commision then you shouldn't have bought the stock. My experience with other brokers is my trades get executed at whatever my limit price is, no exceptions. Long on E-Trade as Honesty counts.

  • Report this Comment On October 11, 2011, at 9:47 AM, stan8331 wrote:

    I would say ArcelorMittal is definitely the cream of this list. Endurance would be another interesting possibility to look at. The other three could pay off big in some scenarios, but they're too opaque and/or speculative for me.

  • Report this Comment On October 11, 2011, at 1:50 PM, jm7700229 wrote:

    I like MT at this price, but a couple days ago, the Financial Times had an article about softening in steel prices. It may be that MT has farther to drop before the recovery. I agree with Kariku that coming to some kind of solution about Greece and the Euro will help everyone, but MT is still going to be having trouble in India (why, in its home country, for God's sake?) and China.

  • Report this Comment On October 20, 2011, at 6:53 AM, skypilot2005 wrote:

    Thanks Matt. MT looks good. I placed it on my watch list.

  • Report this Comment On May 25, 2012, at 6:41 PM, Rk703 wrote:

    Solar stocks, u can have em. Bounce maybe, the dead cat variety. No $ to keep propping up and can't compete w cheaper options. Solar.., someday maybe...

  • Report this Comment On May 25, 2012, at 7:13 PM, Rujikin wrote:

    MT looks very interesting thanks for heads up

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