Why the Dow's Feeling Groggy This Morning

With investors putting big economic stimulus packages behind them, the markets are starting to focus on some of the tired old news stories. This morning, the lack of any positive news from Europe over the weekend seems to have markets on edge, especially with the failure of eurozone leadership to come up with a united front. With this, along with the fiscal cliff looming as we approach the final six weeks before the 2012 elections, stocks gave up ground. The Dow Jones Industrials (INDEX: ^DJI  ) fell about 50 points by 10:30 a.m. EDT.

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC  ) led the Dow's decliners, falling nearly 2.5%. In the absence of positive news to the contrary, investors seem certain that the chipmaker won't be able to overcome stubborn weakness in the PC market to build up a substantial presence in the mobile industry. Given the rampant pessimism, if Intel can enter the mobile market convincingly, then there's a lot of upside in the stock's price.

The Dow's telecom stocks were up, with AT&T (NYSE: T  ) rising three-quarters of a percent while Verizon posted a more modest gain. The iPhone 5 release went extremely well in its opening weekend, with 5 million sales reported. comScore reported that among U.S. preorders for the iPhone between Sept. 14 and Sept. 16, AT&T garnered a whopping 68%, compared with Verizon's 24% and Sprint's (NYSE: S  ) meager 8%. Yet those numbers often change quickly, so AT&T's early win definitely isn't a death knell for Verizon.

Finally, Boeing (NYSE: BA  ) fell about 0.6% despite winning a $1.9 billion contract from the U.S. Navy. The contract includes purchases of 11 P-8 surveillance planes for the Navy. As defense cuts start taking shape, victories like this will become increasingly important for Boeing and its defense contractor peers.

How to deal with a groggy stock
Sometimes companies go through long periods of underperformance, but it's important to judge them not by their market trend but by their true prospects. With Intel, for instance, a huge amount rides on its ability to sustain its core business while expanding beyond its comfort zone. Fool analyst Andrew Tonner shares his thoughts and comes to a surprising conclusion about where the company's headed. Read his thoughts in the Fool's premium report on Intel, which includes a year's worth of updates as the company strives to establish itself in the mobile space. Click here and get in the know today.

Fool contributor Dan Caplinger doesn't own shares of the companies mentioned in this article. You can follow him on Twitter @DanCaplinger. The Motley Fool owns shares of Intel. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Intel. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Fool has a disclosure policy.


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