Foolish Road Test! Driving the Tesla Model S

You've probably heard about Tesla's famous high-performance electric cars, but what's it like to actually drive one? Motley Fool analyst Rex Moore visited the Washington, D.C., showroom and found out -- and is ready to take you along for the ride. Watch the video to see what Rex thinks about the new Model S -- and Tesla as an investment.

Tesla is a proud American company headquartered in Silicon Valley -- but it's not one of the stocks mentioned by our analysts in "3 American Companies Set to Dominate the World." Click here to get your free copy before it’s gone.


Read/Post Comments (12) | Recommend This Article (55)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On October 04, 2012, at 2:14 PM, jayo5yahoo wrote:

    I drove this same car while at a conference in DC early last month. The short test drive to the Pentagon exit off the I-395 was enough to convince me to place a deposit at that dealership (soon). The build quality is as impressive as the concept, all electric luxury vehicle with power, comfort and convienence of filling up at home. Model S has derailed my plans for BMW 5/6 series upgrade from my current 525i. Model S lead time to delivery not a problem for me, I can wait. My son's delayed inheritance of the 525i, on the other hand, is an issue that he'll have to deal with til the Model S arrives home. I fully expect the 525i to be the first and last gasoline commuter vehicle my son to ever own. I forsee Tesla being coveted as a auto marque by his generation just like BMW was mine...

  • Report this Comment On October 04, 2012, at 5:07 PM, XMFCommodore wrote:

    Very interesting clip. Thanks for that difficult reporting assignment Rex. I'm sure they had to really twist your arm to conduct that analysis/segment.

    The part about the plan for developing a network of charging stations/infrastructure for long-haul trips is the only part that would likely make me want to wait a little bit (if I could even afford one which I most certainly can't at this point).

    Still, it's a neat concept and it appears that they're executing on it nicely. Plus, the head-turning quotient appears high which is nice to see from an American automaker.

    Seems like a strong potential long-term investment.

  • Report this Comment On October 05, 2012, at 10:55 AM, beefangusbeef wrote:

    The good thing is you can now go on vacation without worrying about being out $40k worth of batteries when you come home. It pays not to be an early adopter.

  • Report this Comment On October 05, 2012, at 2:01 PM, TMFSpiffyPop wrote:

    Great work, Rex! I found this so easy to watch, fun, well-done. Thanks. --David

  • Report this Comment On October 05, 2012, at 6:08 PM, struzyna wrote:

    What's wrong with the gasoline powered Lotus on which this is based. Superior in every way except having to pump gas.

  • Report this Comment On October 05, 2012, at 7:09 PM, sheldonross wrote:

    "What's wrong with the gasoline powered Lotus on which this is based. Superior in every way except having to pump gas."

    The Model S is not based on a Lotus.

  • Report this Comment On October 06, 2012, at 9:47 AM, TMFBreakerRob wrote:

    Nice professional job, Rex!

    I appreciate that you mentioned that it is a risky investment, not an inevitable success. :)

  • Report this Comment On October 07, 2012, at 9:40 PM, tangoev wrote:

    i was in the Bellvue mall close to Seattle and walked in to a Tesla shop with a car in the mall. It looked very cool. It was getting some attention from the local Microsoft crew and sundry others. The build quality and finish was quite superb.

  • Report this Comment On October 08, 2012, at 10:30 AM, TMFMuse wrote:

    jayo5yahoo wrote: "Model S has derailed my plans for BMW 5/6 series upgrade from my current 525i."

    I think this is key for thinking about the potential success of Tesla. Don't think of other electric or hybrid vehicles (Toyota Prius, Chevy Volt, etc.) as competition. This is a premium vehicle being sold to enthusiasts. The fact that it's electric just makes it that much more unique/fun/interesting/attractive. As long as the electric drive doesn't compromise performance (which it doesn't), this goes head-to-head with BMW and friends.

    Long term, as Rex points out, perhaps they'll get into the family car business. In the meantime, there are plenty of potential customers in the premium market.

  • Report this Comment On October 12, 2012, at 1:16 PM, oldfool1949 wrote:

    Tesla has the same problems as the Volt and Leaf. It still uses a bulky, heavy, unsafe battery. I understand that Tesla has the ability to replace everything on the car, but the battery. The problem is, the battery is where 90% of problems occur, and that's the one thing they can't fix! Electric cars will only become practical when someone begins to design and build them with onboard generators, so they generate their own power as they drive, and have unlimited range. I grew up in a gas station, and I know this is not impossible.

  • Report this Comment On October 12, 2012, at 5:10 PM, focher wrote:

    Exactly how is the Lithium ion battery unsafe? Every smartphone, tablet, and laptop use them. They are allowed on commercial airlines and pretty much everywhere. That's just a falsehood. It's also ironic that you have a sentence that says an EV needs to be built with "onboard generators, so they generate their own power as they drive, and have unlimited range." That's what the Volt essentially is with current technology.

    Personally I will be soon putting my deposit on the Model X. These cars are better than their combustion based relatives in every way.

  • Report this Comment On November 11, 2013, at 12:24 PM, leikhe wrote:

    " I understand that Tesla has the ability to replace everything on the car, but the battery. The problem is, the battery is where 90% of problems occur, and that's the one thing they can't fix!"

    And this is entirely incorrect. Tesla is developing stations to do just what you say they cannot - interchange battery packs on the road. You drive in near depletion and a few minutes later drive out fully charged. The process is not expected to take more than 30 minutes.

    Yes, of course - the old dream. Simple physics shows it to be unlikely to be able to self generate enough power to continue forever. The weight of the machine increases with the addition of generators able to fully charge the batteries which then must be increased to move the heavier car. You see, this cannot result in a perpetual machine as the bulk of the thing would not be allowed on roads and it would become so heavy that it couldn't move if it were. A perpetual gas station myth is more like it.

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 2043948, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 11/27/2014 8:56:46 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement