Is the iPad Mini Dead on Arrival?

Compared to the iPhone 5, the iPad Mini launch struck some investors as underwhelming. It's hard for Apple to make every launch an epic event.

Fool.com contributors Chris Bledsoe and Austin Smith believe the concern is misplaced. Beyond being a very compelling product, the iPad Mini will likely be very meaningful for Apple investors. What seems to be happening is that Apple has set the bar so high for itself, that people view extraordinary performance as mediocre.

Of course, the real question is whether Apple is a buy today at these cheaper prices. Our premium research report on Apple will help you answer that question. In it, you'll learn everything you need to know about the new product launch, and receive ongoing guidance as key news hits. Claim your copy today by clicking here now.


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  • Report this Comment On November 07, 2012, at 6:12 PM, peanutgalerygeek wrote:

    Hope not. I want a cellular one to use at work and leave my iPad at home. It is note tablet sized and very light. Perfect for my work notes and integrates well with iCloud services.

  • Report this Comment On November 07, 2012, at 6:17 PM, st0815 wrote:

    I'm not convinced. Sure the iPad-Mini as it's currently designed allows Apple to sell older technology. That's certainly a benefit.

    However a premium vendor can sell higher quality at a significantly higher price point - not simply lower quality at an inflated price. The quality of the display is not high enough, the competitors offer more.

    Even worse, by reacting on the smaller Android tablets they draw attention to the competition and invite an unfavourable comparison. They are devaluing the brand, just like Samsung did with their S3 mini.

    Apple doesn't have much to offer in the 7" category - a slightly better OS, and more content. Tablet-specific apps don't really matter on a screen that size.

    They should have waited until they could have made a worthy competitor to the Nexus 7, I think rushing the iPad-Mini into battle was a bad move. Having a near monopoly in the tablet space couldn't last in the long run, but it appears they have hastened it's demise. In any case, Android will make significant inroads in the tablet market now, that's showing in the Nexus sales numbers. Whether Google makes much money from that is another problem, but it hurts Apple in any case.

    Second problem: supply issues. This shows bad planning on Apple's part, and it keeps repeating with each new product introduction. It should not have happened with a device which uses "old parts". Also Apple seems to crank out designs which are hard to manufacture. It can be worthwhile to push the envelope, but only if you actually manage to get your innovations built.

    All this indicates some structural problems at Apple, and it's reasonable to be weary until they show that they can overcome them.

  • Report this Comment On November 07, 2012, at 8:20 PM, snafflekid wrote:

    Apple uses the "tick-tock" model again to squeeze more life and profit out of proven components. Bravo.

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