GM Has a Lingering Pickup Inventory Problem

General Motors (NYSE: GM  ) has a pickup problem. For the first time since 2007, the company is revamping its full-size-truck architecture. GM executives hope that an improved pickup lineup will eventually allow GM to overtake industry leader Ford's (NYSE: F  ) F-150 series in sales.

The switch from the older GMT900 truck architecture to the new K2XX architecture involves a complex rolling changeover of GM's three pickup plants. The company plans a total of 10 weeks of downtime at those plants over the next few months as they switch to 2014 model year production. Over the past year, GM has built up its full-size-pickup inventories so that it will have enough 2013 models to sell until 2014 models start arriving at dealers. However, management has had trouble keeping inventories at just the right level.

The stakes
The big three American automakers rely heavily on pickup sales to generate profits. A fully equipped pickup can produce as much as $10,000 of profit per vehicle, far more than a passenger car. However, this assumes that incentives are kept at a moderate level. When the 2014 model year trucks arrive this summer, it will become increasingly difficult to sell the previous generation models without resorting to heavy discounting. On the other hand, GM will have trouble driving sales of the new trucks if 2013 models are sitting in the same showrooms for $5,000-$10,000 less.

A similar problem happened in November. That month, GM saw an unexpected year-over-year decline in truck sales. Management blamed the weakness on having a higher proportion of 2013 models than competitors. Competitors were offering high incentives to clear 2012 inventory, which dampened demand for GM's trucks.

A dangerous game
Last Friday, GM announced strong truck sales for the month of January. Nevertheless, full-size-truck inventories increased by over 12,000 units sequentially, to 234,342 units. This represented 117 days of supply, up from 80 days of supply at the end of December. Despite the inventory increase, on the accompanying conference call, management claimed that inventory and production schedules were "in the middle of the fairway" compared to plans.

However, February is a weaker sales month. GM sold 43,603 combined Silverado and Sierra pickups in February 2012, when sales benefited from an extra day (Feb. 29th) and the industry sales rate was unseasonably high. GM will have a hard time replicating the strong growth it saw in January without resorting to higher incentives. With the new truck launch approaching, GM cannot afford another unexpected spike in inventory.

Risks ahead
More broadly, GM's high pickup inventory level creates significant risks for the company's 2013 profitability. If any unexpected development hurts demand for GM's pickups, high inventories of the 2013 models will affect the launch of the new models, as discussed earlier. For example, competitors could ramp up incentive spending as they did in late-2012. Lower consumer confidence could impact sales in the next few months. Lastly, Toyota (NYSE: TM  ) is launching its redesigned Tundra pickup at the Chicago Auto Show this month. Given the recent weakening of the yen (which makes U.S. sales more profitable for Toyota), Toyota could move to price the new truck aggressively in order to gain market share.

It is possible that none of these scenarios will materialize. However, until GM completes its pickup transition this year, the stock will be subject to an elevated level of risk, due to the potential for "hiccups."

It's true that decades of mismanagement of General Motors led to a painful bankruptcy in 2009, but it emerged a leaner, stronger company. GM's turnaround, however, is still a work in progress. Investors around the world are wondering if GM has what it takes to reclaim its former glory. John Rosevear has put together a brand-new premium research report telling you what you need to know about GM and its turnaround. If you own or are thinking about owning GM, then you don't want to miss this report. Click here now to get started.


Read/Post Comments (2) | Recommend This Article (5)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On February 06, 2013, at 12:38 AM, rh33 wrote:

    What!? GM's pickup supply increased by 37 days in only one month? How could that happen? GM must have kept making them at the same rate while the purchase rate dropped to zero and about 25% of the people who bought them the previous month returned them.

  • Report this Comment On February 06, 2013, at 2:43 PM, TMFGemHunter wrote:

    The "days supply" figure can vary pretty radically from month to month based on the sales pace. In December GM was providing pretty heavy incentives. Since December is already a better month seasonally than January, that drove the sales pace much higher. If you look back to November (when sales were disappointing), the days of supply number was even higher at 139.

    But that's the point. GM needs a few consecutive months of strong sales to get the number down to a more normal level.

Add your comment.

DocumentId: 2237342, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 4/16/2014 6:29:25 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement