Yes, You Will Be Able to Print Food in the Future

Ping Fu, author of Bend, Not Break, founder and CEO of Geomagic, and incoming chief strategy officer at 3D Systems (NYSE: DDD  ) , tells of her journey from being a penniless newcomer to the United States to becoming an incredibly successful CEO.

3D Systems is at the leading edge of a disruptive technological revolution, with the broadest portfolio of 3-D printers in the industry. However, despite years of earnings growth, 3D Systems' share price has risen even faster, and today the company sports a dizzying valuation. To help investors decide whether the future of additive manufacturing is bright enough to justify the lofty price tag on the company's shares, The Motley Fool has compiled a premium research report on whether 3D Systems is a buy right now. In our report, we take a close look at 3D Systems' opportunities, risks, and critical factors for growth. You'll also find reasons to buy or sell and receive a full year of analyst updates with the report. To start reading, simply click here now for instant access.

Bend, Not Break website

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Ping Fu's Twitter feed

The transcript below is lightly edited. 

Brendan: What particular markets or industries do you think show the most promise for 3D Systems products? ... I know you have the necklace here made from 3D printer, and you have the purse over there. What other things down the road do you think 3D printing can really help with?

Ping: The area that I'm very excited about is certainly metal to produce materials that are lighter and stronger and more flexible. Ceramic -- anything that you use ceramic to do can all be changed into 3D printing. It's exciting.

And medical and bioscience, like one of the companies I'm involved with as advisor is printing meat and leather with slaughterhouses. So if one cow can feed an entire nation, we can produce high-quality protein to developing countries without having this unsustainable way of raising cows.

Brendan: How does that work? It still sounds like science fiction.

Ping: Those will take longer. It's already possible today to print ground meat, but it's not quite there yet to print the consistency of steak or chicken or pork. But there are lots of hamburger patties and dumpling fillings, right?

Brendan: Yes.

Ping: The way it works is it uses stem-cell tissue engineering and in-vitro technology to print the structure of those natural meats and then let it grow. It's very exciting.



Read/Post Comments (5) | Recommend This Article (9)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On February 15, 2013, at 8:22 AM, Helismoke wrote:

    "Appearances have become completely unhinged from reality when it comes to the mania created in so-called '3D Printing' stocks, and 3D Systems in particular," Citron Research said. "Behind every good bubble there is a good promoter, in this case we have the best in Abe Reichental."

    The stock value on DDD dropped because of this report from Citron. As they concentrate on fraudulent stocks I'd sure like to see a rebuttal from The Fool. There are always naysayers, but Citron seems fairly reliable and we own some shares of DDD due to The Fool's recommendations.

  • Report this Comment On February 15, 2013, at 12:25 PM, Helismoke wrote:

    PS.

    I just read the Andrew Left description by Danny on the Community Forum about DDD.

    Good info that I can use.

  • Report this Comment On February 16, 2013, at 2:08 AM, Not2BeFooled wrote:

    BE AWARE THAT PING FU IS FOUND A LIAR IN HER BOOK. PLEASE CHECK THE AMAZON BOOK REVIEW AND http://www.citronresearch.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/DDD... BEFORE YOU INVESTMENT.

  • Report this Comment On February 17, 2013, at 10:41 AM, ppwin wrote:

    I am Chinese in America, and not proud on Chinese's Culture Revolution, but Ping Fu's stories in her book are so far away from the facts. I really can't believe such book full of fabricated and self-conflicting stories would be praised by Motley Fool. Don't make yourself laughable, Motley Fool. Please show some intellect.

    By the way, I am also a postdoc in life science field. My opinion, it's really unpractical to culture "meat" in 3D frame, because of the expenditure is far more higher than regular culture in a farm, considering the conditions for cells culture are so delicate and need precisely controlled. Even if we can manage to lower the cost, why we need 3D printer to create such frame? we have away more costless ways to produce those frame things. It's possible to produce customer-specific product in surgical area, but Stratasys (SSYS) has much more advantage before DDD.

  • Report this Comment On February 17, 2013, at 9:13 PM, LarryT7 wrote:

    Come on, expert Ping, the best use of 3D printer is not better than a meat blender taking hours to produce one piece of steak?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Ping: Those will take longer. It's already possible today to print ground meat, but it's not quite there yet to print the consistency of steak or chicken or pork. But there are lots of hamburger patties and dumpling fillings, right?

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