The Only Real Way to Grow Nuclear Power

There's been a lot of debate here in Fooldom on the facts that both demystify nuclear energy as well as those that sink it. The real fact is that until the zombie apocalypse arrives, nuclear energy is here to stay, whether we like to or not. Further, as long as it's here, utilities will continue to look for ways to grow their own nuclear capacity.

Right now only one utility in the country is building a new nuclear reactor. Given the long lead time, regulatory hurdles, and frighteningly high capital requirements, it's not an easy undertaking. However, adding nuclear capacity is something that many in the industry view as being a profitable endeavor, and many utilities have highlighted that as an area they plan to grow. Here's where it gets interesting. Most utilities are investing to add nuclear capacity without building new generation. Before we get to how that's possible, let's look at the industry's economics.

Southern (NYSE: SO  ) , which is the first company in the country to break ground on new nuclear generation, is doing so because it believes nuclear power to be 15% to 40% less expensive than wind and 50% to 80% less expensive than solar. That's saying a lot, considering that its project, which has been in the planning stages for almost a decade and won't begin commercial operations until 2016, comes with a price tag of more than $14 billion. Even with cost overruns and lengthy delays, Southern believes nuclear expansion is critical for future. 

It also says a lot when wind-driven NextEra Energy (NYSE: NEE  ) is looking to grow its own new nuclear capacity. It even has plans to build a new generator, even though it is estimated to cost between $12 billion and $18 billion. The project would add 2,200 MW of generating capacity to NextEra's fleet. However, before the company ever moves forward with that project, it'll already have increased its nuclear capacity by 400 MW while spending a fraction of the cost. That's because NextEra, along with most of its nuclear generating peers, has turned to using nuclear uprates to boost capacity. 

Uprates, which increase generating capacity by installing components necessary to increase the generating power of a reactor, are the only real way to grow nuclear capacity these days. NextEra, for example, is spending $1.5 billion on an uprate program to add 400 MW of generating capacity. While that's not on the level of the $16 billion the company has spent to build its 10,000 MW of wind capacity, it's still more cost-effective than those new nuclear reactors. The other big difference to consider here is that the life of a wind farm is estimated at 20 to 25 years, while nuclear generators can keep the juice on for more than 40 years.

Top nuclear generator Exelon (NYSE: EXC  ) has been in the process of adding 1,300 MW of capacity via uprates. The eight-year, $2.3 billion plan has now been put on hold because of low natural gas prices, which have really hit Exelon hard. Still, the company has added 310 MW of nuclear capacity since 2009 by way of uprates, and they'll continue to deliver a much bigger long-term bang for the buck. 

This is especially true when you consider the cost of other renewables. Last year, Exelon bought a 230 MW solar farm from First Solar (NASDAQ: FSLR  ) for $1.36 billion, which included a $646 million loan guarantee from the federal government. While government programs and subsidies make renewables very attractive right now, if those end, uprates will again top the list of priorities at utilities looking to grow clean generating capacity.

The debate over nuclear energy isn't going to go away in our lifetime. While few new reactors are likely to be built anytime soon, uprates will continue to be the quiet way that utilities to grow generation capacity. It's really the only realistic way to grow nuclear power these days.

While it's currently halting its uprate program, few do nuclear power better than Exelon. As the nation moves increasingly toward clean energy, Exelon is perfectly positioned to capitalize on it as it has the largest nuclear fleet in North America. Combine this strength with an increased focus on renewable energy, and Exelon's recent merger with Constellation places Exelon and its now more solid dividend on a short list of top utilities. To determine if Exelon is a good long-term fit for your portfolio, you're invited to check out The Motley Fool's premium research report on the company. Simply click here now for instant access.


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  • Report this Comment On March 04, 2013, at 7:25 PM, ThoriumPower wrote:

    The headline itself is incredibly misleading..."The Only Real Way to Grow Nuclear Power". NOT TRUE!!! I wish to god that someone out there would FINALLY look into and do a serious story about THORIUM REACTORS. They are "nuclear" but completely impossible to melt down, AND we will never run out of Thorium, as opposed to Uranium, of which supplies will be gone within this century. Oh and not to mention, the end waste (of which there is minimal to none) cannot be used for nuclear weapons, UNlike current conventional reactors. Please please PLEASE research Thorium Power and spread the word!!!!!

  • Report this Comment On March 04, 2013, at 7:26 PM, ThoriumPower wrote:

    The following documentary is a must-watch... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ9Ll5EX1jc

  • Report this Comment On March 04, 2013, at 9:52 PM, TMFmd19 wrote:

    @ThoriumPower - Thanks for the tip on Thorium, I must admit I've never heard of it.

  • Report this Comment On March 05, 2013, at 4:39 PM, cm33 wrote:

    The only way to make nuclear power work is to get rid of it. Wasn't Fukushima, Hanford, Chernobyl, and many other disaster's enough? Isn't it obvious that it is earth suicide to build these? What will it take for poeople to get it?

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2013, at 11:50 AM, damonbryson wrote:

    In the second paragraph you stated, "Right now only one utility in the country is building a new nuclear reactor."

    That is not correct. Southern is building 2 reactors at the Vogtle site. SCANA is building 2 reactors at the VC Summer site. TVA is building 1 reactor at the Watts Bar site. TVA also has another reactor partially completed but not under active construction at the Bellefonte site.

  • Report this Comment On March 06, 2013, at 7:23 PM, TMFmd19 wrote:

    @damonbryson - According to Southern they are the only company to building a new generation reactor and I think the difference here is the word generation.

    http://www.southerncompany.com/nuclearenergy/home.aspx

    The story among the big utilities will continue to be the growth in uprates, as new reactor projects wont be approved anytime soon.

    -Matt

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