Surprisingly, This Automaker Has the Most Loyal Customers

A recent survey shows that Ford has the most loyal customers of any major American car company. In this video, Brendan Byrnes discusses how Ford is keeping its customers, particularly buyers of pickup trucks. He notes that while Ford has been able to fend off encroachment from Japanese and other automakers, General Motors hasn't been so lucky. Even though the survey listed Chevy at No. 5 in customer loyalty, the remaining GM brands were below average. Ford has a solid customer base and reputation in the United States, but what companies could pose a threat? Find out more in the video.

The Motley Fool's chief investment officer has selected his No. 1 stock for the next year. Find out which stock it is in the brand-new free report: "The Motley Fool's Top Stock for 2013." Just click here to access the report and find out the name of this under-the-radar company.

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  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 2:51 PM, Deltadon77 wrote:

    Ford is a true American Company NOT owned or dictated to by the Government. Thy should be respected for NOT accepting a Government bailout paid for by citizens.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 3:29 PM, Jeffkory wrote:

    I worked for ford 16 years { mechanic } In that time i owned 2 new 150's- both of Mine had the same problems that all the other trucks did that i fixed daily- I got tired of it- I bought my grandpa's 1994 chevy 1500 ex cab when he passed in 1998- with 88k on the odometer- It now has 270k still looks new and runs great- NO MAJOR MECHANICAL PROBLEMS to date- Tires,brakes,oil changes- batteries thats it..This truck is extremely dependable- My fords weren't.Also my daughter bought a new 2012 fusion that started falling apart in the first year- She got rid of it..

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 3:35 PM, JoeMiddleclass wrote:

    Is this a paid for "news" story by Motley Fool to get clients? I have noticed that since the "NEW" yahoo home page has started there are dozens of these "news" stories from Motley Fool which end up promoting their financial advice. SHAME ON YOU YAHOO!!!!

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 3:51 PM, bobthegoodone wrote:

    I bought a Ford Truck my first , always had a GM Truck and after 4 months the dealer wouldn't honor my factory warranty ! Guess I will not buy another Ford !

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 4:08 PM, dshcpa wrote:

    I started driving Fords in the early 90's and have not changed.

    We currently have 3 Fords, a pickup, a Fusion and an Escape, and have had NO problems with any of them. The Escape nags at me though to change the oil.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 4:08 PM, justinphilpot wrote:

    for an American car manufacture i think they make the best product, maybe not the best car but the best from the big 3.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 4:42 PM, Robnati wrote:

    My first new car was a Ford Pinto. Shortly after I bought came the recall and the "Let them burn" revelation from Ford. I remember people refusing to ride in my car. Thanks, Ford, I will never buy another Ford and if you buy one and get the shaft from Ford, I told you so.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 4:43 PM, fatboy46 wrote:

    Deltadon.. sorry, but FORD was 'bailed out too, when the gov;t did the deal for GM and Chrysler.. by keeping the PARTS system operating, FORD got helped out too. If GM and Chrysler went into Bankruptcy, by the time the dust settled out.. the part system would have been shut down- millions of jobs lost, hundreds of thousands of jobs lost for good. We have Barney Fwank and Chris Dodd and Pelosi to thank for the mortgage mess that took the economy down. Granted, the auto makers made a bad deal over the year with the unions and sold their corporate souls to the UAW- but had they NOT been bailed.. we would be in a far, far worse mess than now. That is about the ONLY economic thing I agree with in our gov't bailing out the car business and the financials.

    Remember- Detroit kept on making cars after 9/11 - giving huge discounts just to keep everybody working and buying cars while the economy struggled back. Once again, what was good for GM was good for America.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 5:57 PM, Anon0714 wrote:

    All Auto-Makers who took money from the US Government from 2008-2009.

    Listed as follows- Ford($15.9 Billion), Toyota($4.6 Billion), BMW($6.2 Billion),

    GM($13.9 Billion), Chrysler($4.9 Billion). There is no denying who took what. All are on the Fed balance sheet. It seems as though ford fans deny it the most.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 5:57 PM, Anon0714 wrote:

    The Federal Reserve eventually lent $57.9 billion to the auto industry — including $26.8 billion to Ford, Toyota and BMW. The Fed on Wednesday was forced to reveal the identity of the companies it aided during the crisis, after contending to Congress that keeping their identities and the details of such lending secret was essential. Much of Wall Street, and corporate giants such as General Electric, Harley Davidson and McDonald's, took advantage of the Fed's help. We've done the math on how the Fed propped up the auto industry.

    When the financial markets started to collapse in late 2008, the Fed set up several programs to lend money directly to corporations, a highly unusual step. According to the data, from October 2008 through June 2009 the fed bought $45.1 billion in commercial paper from the credit arms of four automakers - Ford, BMW, Chrysler and Toyota - along with GMAC (the former General Motors credit arm). Of those, Ford sold the most, with $15.9 billion.

    The Fed also lent $13 billion to investors who bought bonds backed by loans to new car buyers from automakers and banks. The Fed made clear that while investors got the loans, the move was meant to keep the lenders in business; the credit arms of Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Volkswagen, Honda and Hyundai all benefited directly.

    BMW told Bloomberg that the Fed lending "supported our financial profile and offered us an additional funding source, especially at times when the money markets and capital markets did not function properly and efficiently."

    According to the Fed, the commercial paper loans have been paid in full, while some $2 billion remains outstanding on loans for bond investors.

    The secrecy surrounding the details of the loans only masked how much aid corporate America and Wall Street needed. While General Motors and Chrysler took the brunt of the blowback for relying on government handouts, the reveal of the Fed numbers show that a far bigger slice of the U.S. auto industry needed help.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 5:58 PM, Anon0714 wrote:

    The Federal Reserve eventually lent $57.9 billion to the auto industry — including $26.8 billion to Ford, Toyota and BMW. The Fed on Wednesday was forced to reveal the identity of the companies it aided during the crisis, after contending to Congress that keeping their identities and the details of such lending secret was essential. Much of Wall Street, and corporate giants such as General Electric, Harley Davidson and McDonald's, took advantage of the Fed's help. We've done the math on how the Fed propped up the auto industry.

    When the financial markets started to collapse in late 2008, the Fed set up several programs to lend money directly to corporations, a highly unusual step. According to the data, from October 2008 through June 2009 the fed bought $45.1 billion in commercial paper from the credit arms of four automakers - Ford, BMW, Chrysler and Toyota - along with GMAC (the former General Motors credit arm). Of those, Ford sold the most, with $15.9 billion.

    The Fed also lent $13 billion to investors who bought bonds backed by loans to new car buyers from automakers and banks. The Fed made clear that while investors got the loans, the move was meant to keep the lenders in business; the credit arms of Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Volkswagen, Honda and Hyundai all benefited directly.

    BMW told Bloomberg that the Fed lending "supported our financial profile and offered us an additional funding source, especially at times when the money markets and capital markets did not function properly and efficiently."

    According to the Fed, the commercial paper loans have been paid in full, while some $2 billion remains outstanding on loans for bond investors.

    The secrecy surrounding the details of the loans only masked how much aid corporate America and Wall Street needed. While General Motors and Chrysler took the brunt of the blowback for relying on government handouts, the reveal of the Fed numbers show that a far bigger slice of the U.S. auto industry needed help.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 6:14 PM, Anon0461 wrote:

    I don't know how ford fans deny it, but it's obvious the remarks you hear from them explain it. As well as import fans. Immature comments and rants. It is what it is. GM and Chrysler weren't the only ones who took money. Majority of the US Auto Industry was having some complications. There was no brand who was not affected. So, technically to all those (insult phrase), all mentioned Auto-Makers took money. Everyone one of them is/was supported by the bailout in some way. They all owed and all repaid these amounts. Stop making excuses!

    - Federal Reserve/Government Loans 2008-2009.

    Ford($15.9 Billion)

    GM($13.9 Billion)

    BMW($6.2 Billion)

    Chrysler($4.9 Billion)

    Toyota($4.6 Billion)

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 6:18 PM, Anon0461 wrote:

    XD

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 6:21 PM, Anon0461 wrote:

    Separately, $13 billion to investors from credit arms of Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Volkswagen, Honda and Hyundai all benefited directly.

    : o

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 6:42 PM, TripleX2 wrote:

    I bought a brand new Ford truck in 94. It was very nice , however the door ajar light and alarm started to stay on after about a year and could not be fixed without disconnecting it. Not too big of a deal, then the dome light started to stay on for a very long time, had to be disconnected. Then after about 150,000 miles the transmission started to slip between third and fourth gears. I talked with other Ford truck owners and they all had something electrical in the cab malfunction and their transmissions started slipping after 100,000 miles. I ended up trading mine in as part of a down payment on a Tundra. A much nicer truck with zero isues after 7 years of ownership and over 100,000 miles. I won't own another Ford. FORD= Fix Or Repair Daily.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 6:56 PM, gspns wrote:

    I bought my first Ford a Mustang GT in 08. I traded that in and bought my second Mustang GT in 2011. I never considered myself a "Ford man" but I guess I am. Ford won me over because they make good cars now. They want your business and they work hard to get it. The paradigm out there is that all american cars are crap, and imports rule. I had a 4runner and still do for 21 years, it was OK, except for every 80K it needed head gaskets. I've spent 33K on top of the original 24K to keep the 4runner running. Let's see how much I spend on the Ford.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 7:39 PM, eddie3896 wrote:

    I use to be a absolute GM man. I have owned

    6 Corvettes and as much as I love that car,

    I'll never buy another GM auto. Why? Seven out

    of ten GM vehicles are now made in China. The

    so-call bail-out money went to GM Unions since

    China was actually bailing them out. What did

    we, the taxpayer get...a screwing! Ford is the

    only vehicle I'll buy from now on. And I love my

    F-150 pick-up. So will you!

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 7:47 PM, peterwolf wrote:

    Im not surprised. Ford quality is very good. I drive a 93 Ford Crown Vic. Yes, 20 years old. Lots of things have started falling apart on it ( power windows, sun visors, paint peeling) but mechanically still very good. No GM or Chrysler product would last that long.

    Plus, people are generally angry that GM ( Government Motors) took the Washington cheese. Ford did not.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:06 PM, BEARFACTSONLY wrote:

    I only drive a chevy.I have my chevy s-10 for 13 years.My dad gave it to me and I've had no problems with it.It has over 180000 miles and it's still going strong.My sister bought a mustang and she's been having problems with it.But my brother-in-law loves Ford's and will never change.PEOPLE,I will not buy one they're no good for me in my book.Good luck if you get one.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:07 PM, lauri4me wrote:

    I have had 11 fords. My most recent a Boss 302

    Im ford all the way

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:31 PM, patienttype wrote:

    The article is accurate. I have owned several Ford and Mercury vehicles in the past 20 years. I will not consider GM or Chrysler for a car purchase.

    So, for this family, the selection is Japanese, German, or Ford. That is a little ironic given I grew up in a family that consistently bought GM back in the day when GM products were made with pride.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:41 PM, prv8eye wrote:

    When someone posts a rambling message full of "facts", as if he's an expert with the inside scoop, but then posts "anonymous" it's difficult not to highly doubt the accuracy of the message.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:43 PM, indy06 wrote:

    Ok, Ford sold paper (loans) to create cash to restructure. They did also take loans under a DoE program designed to come up with a more fuel efficient car line.

    Ford did NOT: 1-Take handout money that they did not pay back. This is why we the taxpayers got stuck with 61% of GM in stock that it isn't worth the amount given. 2-Go BK and stiff everybody who they owed money to.

    Ford in fact had loans, the other 2 stuck everybody including us. Big difference! Try something like factcheck instead of some anti-Ford site for you info in the future please.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:46 PM, prv8eye wrote:

    I've owned Toyotas, Chevys, a Dodge and several Volkswagons but my Crown Victoria is the best car I've ever owned.

    It is COMFORTABLE, reliable (207,000 miles so far with only routine maintainace) and FAST!!

    It's an old 95 P-71 police interceptor. Not much to look at but it's an AMAZING car. Had it five years.

    Coincidentally, my wife owns a 94 E-350 for her business. These are the first two Fords we ever owned but they will NOT be our last.

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 8:52 PM, drava32000 wrote:

    My first car was a 1930 Ford Model A Cabrolet (a fake convertible ie cloth top did not go down) with a rumble seat in rear Drove this all during High School No problems at all

    Next car was a used 1950 Ford Tudor Sedan with overdrive Drove this car all during college, and four years thereafter whilest in US Army and when working thereafter. Did one valve and ring job for $ 150.00

    Had seat covers and door panes upholstered with "Naughyde" vinyl which wore like iron

    Sold car for a new 1961 Studebaker coupe with floor shifter (4 speed tranie) Car was painted "Flamingo" )(hot stuff in the day) That car was taken over by my sister until daddie bought her new 1964 I/2 Mustage Converable

    And on and on it went

  • Report this Comment On April 07, 2013, at 10:21 PM, Aurora911 wrote:

    I really have never been a brand specific person. In 1992 I purchased a Ford F150 4x4. I compared it to Chevy and Dodge at the time. It seemed to be the best vehicle with many advantages over Chevy and Dodge. I would never buy a Dodge. Way too many problems reported over the years. Ford at that time had a multiport fuel injection while Chevy was still using unibody fuel injection. Chevy's vacuum assist into 4x4 was reported to be problematic. What I did notice with the Ford through the years is that they used cheaper inferior metal parts in various areas. That is how they kept them cheaper than Chevy's. For instance after 10 years the oil pan rusted out. It was a huge pain to replace it as the engine had to be lifted to get the oil pan out. Chevy used a forged aluminum pan during that time. A lot of things rusted out through the years, ie. many braking components (brake drums, brake lines, shields), fuel tanks, fuel lines, body panels, especially noticed on extended cabs. The truck now sits besides my garage in need of a lot of work. The suspension system is very spongy. I figured I could pour thousands of dollars and my mechanical time and I would still end up with an unreliable truck. I guess I have kept it for sentimental reasons. It has not worked for three years and only has 93k miles on it. I decided to just purchase a new truck. I wanted to get a heavier duty truck with a diesel engine. Back to the investigation I went. I decided on purchasing a Chevy HD2500 (2012) based on the fact that Ford went through 4 different diesel engine types in the past decade. Chevy had the Duramax engine with an Allison transmission. I have had the truck for only a year now and it has been a charm. I am completely satisfied with zero problems. I was so pleased that I just went out and purchased a 2013 Chevy Cruze. I have been pleased with that little car, with the exception that it's fuel mileage is somewhat less than advertised. I wanted to put my money where my mouth is and buy something American to support my fellow Americans. I think foreign trucks are okay, but none of them compete with the 3/4 ton American trucks. I would just love to hook onto a Tundra and drag it down the road.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 12:32 AM, loralie97 wrote:

    I was a big time FORD person until a couple of days ago. My Ford f150 2001 model did something I thought it could never happen to a vehicle of any sort. The frame right over the wheel hub broke on both sides. The only reason I noticed it was because the bed of the pickup was riding high. The strange thing is that it broke in a perfect straight line as if someone cut it with scissors. There was no rust to speak of. What made it even more devestating is that I was just at the dealership the day before and paid $300 work on the throttle body. Now my truck, "Brown Sugar", is a total loss and will be parted out. Chevrolet here I come!!!!

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 12:37 AM, loralie97 wrote:

    FORD = F ound O n R oad D ead

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 12:38 AM, Rbert16000 wrote:

    They lost me!!! It was not the cars, it was the crappy sales team.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 1:52 AM, Anon0875 wrote:

    Perhaps prv8eye should learn to research himself. There isn't 1 thing wrong about the post you whine about. So, then maybe everyone should be named Perv, to be taken more seriously. sigh...

    It doesn't matter if any brand fan argues or denies it. The companies took money. The End! If you have plenty of money, it's no big deal. You just buy what you want CASH, but most people can't do that. So, you end up getting these 1-Brand fanatics. Coincidentally, who don't have proper funds to buy anyway. Everyone now-a-days defends what they can afford. All argues, and hates what they can not. No car Brand is excluded from defects.

    It's funny that some speak of Made in China. 2 of the top import Brands in the US are majority China parts.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 1:57 AM, Anon0875 wrote:

    I'm Japanese, I can tell you nobody of wealth buys Honda or Toyota in Japan. They are budget brands. Cheaply made. Only, the poor buy these brands. These cars are made of too much Chinese parts (more than half). Which is disgrace to my people. Much of wealthy Japanese in America, buy American or European. They stay away from Honda and Toyota uso tsuki. Only a baka, will buy this saitei junk. You look for these China Parts plants yourselves if you can. Honda/Acura, Toyota/Lexus are scam. They try hard to hide this China parts from Americans. This dasai thinking from Americans is typical. Bakas know nothing about cars. I been to Europe(Britain, Germany, France, Italy), Australia, China. Nobody agrees (w/US)or likes these brands, other than the poor. Which are the only people who buy and defend this crap. Middle-Income and poor (Amerians) talk about quality as if they know what that is. You can't afford it, that's why a lot of you defend these cheap China cars. American sales and financing show your ignorance.

    You can look at almost any parts/mechanical failure, in these cars. More than likely, it was made in China (also, possibly from Indonesia). With transmission being the biggest part failure. Have you ever wonder why these cars are so loud on the road? Not sealed properly? Burn oil beyond repair? Valves, Electronics, Jerking, Brakes, dashboard cracking, gearing issues, etc.

    You can see why Americans have the worldwide reputation that they do. Stupidity! Pure Baka. In America, middle-income and below buy these cars. Your sales and financing, prove it. Is it coincidence that only middle-income and below defend what they can afford? Everybody here finances things they can't afford. Why nobody buy cash? New financed(bank owned) car living in Apartment? or Renting house? Snobby attitudes and yet finance, finance, finance. You finance cars worth as much as your yearly income or more, fools! Financing and leasing things you can't afford. It is no wonder the best cars are usually kept out of the US. If you don't have 20k dollars, you shouldn't be financing for one. Same for the luxury brands 30k dollars and up.

    Why do only Americans say Import Assembled/Manufactured cars are made in US? Honda and Toyota have more Chinese parts than Japanese or American.

    I use example for you misunderstanding of imports Made in US-

    If you order a bicycle, and it comes in a box with parts. You assemble it yourself. Does it mean it was Made by You? No! So why say these foreign cars are Made in US? fuzakeru na!

    Here is information from articles, auto-makers and governments:

    - Buying US-built imports that employ less Americans, uses less than 40% US-parts

    - Honda manufacturers in North America, uses Canada, US, Mexico. Same as Domestic vehicles.

    - Honda Dealers in Canada and Europe have 75% Honda parts from china. Example: Honda Fit, badged- Jazz(in Europe)

    - Chinese cars VIN #'s begin with "L", much like "J" for Japan.

    Hopefully, the "L" doesn't stand for LEAD.

    Vin#- Begins with: 1-US, 2-Canada, 3-Mexico, 6-Australia

    - Costs will bring many Chinese made Honda's to the US. Also, Canada and Mexico will see Assembly Plants increase for this reason.

    - 89% of Honda's for US are assembled in Canada, US, and Mexico. However, using less than 40% US parts, +40% Chinese parts, 15% Real-Japan made parts. Also, because of the misconception by Americans only, about cars being Made-In-America. Japan is considering raising the # of cars assembled in the US. Increasing their profit on US assembled cars, using +65% foreign parts.

    - Just like China manipulating its currency for exports, Japan is following its steps. The number of Honda Parts plants in China are growing. The yen bestows up to a $4,000-per-vehicle benefit for Japanese automakers sold Worldwide.

    - "Honda has been exporting Chinese-built Fits for some time, particularly to European countries (where it’s sold as the Jazz), thus in many regards adding Canada to the roster of export markets seems a logical step."

    - "Michelle Krebs, a senior analyst with Edmunds believes American consumers are more resistant to the idea of buying Chinese products, especially cars, thus the concept of doing so at this point, given that the US is still a major source of both profit and prestige for Japanese automakers, would probably not work in Honda’s favor."

    - Toyota already has an alliance with China's First Automotive Works (FAW) and plans to make 300,000 to 400,000 compacts, luxury sedans and sports utility vehicles annually in China. Guangzhou(China), meanwhile, has a joint venture with Honda Motor Co, Japan's second-ranked automaker.

    - Guangzhou Automobile, owned by Hong Kong's Denway Motors Ltd, set up a joint venture with Honda in 1998, known as Guangzhou Honda Automotive Co Ltd, to produce the Accord Sedan.

    - Japanese automakers are exploiting an artificially weak yen to make their products more affordable.

    - Toyota Managers cited Political and Social risk for Selling vehicles to U.S. customers with high proportions of foreign-made parts. Less than half of all content of Toyota vehicles(-40%) sold in the United States is made in the United States or Canada.

    - Honda & Toyota combined don't hire nearly as many Americans as Domestic makers.

    - Toyota's Chinese supplier(Denso) complains of backlash effects. Denso- who makes Sensors, Electronic Control parts, etc.

    - Toyota operates many factories in China, and many more are run by Toyota subsidiaries.

    - Domestic vehicles employ more Americans, and avg- 80% US-parts, 10% European, 10% Chinese. Similar to European mass-produced cars using small percentage of Chinese parts.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 2:05 AM, Anon0875 wrote:

    お金の争い

    世界的な

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 7:08 AM, TJB1961 wrote:

    My last two car's were Chevy Impala's. Both had head gasket problems. The 2010 Impala head gasket went out before I ever made the first payment. I have had great luck with Ford and will never buy a GM again.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 10:08 AM, HMan45 wrote:

    I will never buy another Ford again. For some reason, I was a loyal Ford customer but after my 2007 Fusion with 102k blew the transmission, I was fed up.

    This was after our Explorer also blew a transmission with 77k. And a Taurus with 20k but that was covered by warranty.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 10:57 AM, Easttexas9 wrote:

    This is a story about brand loyalty. I have worked at the BIG 3 dealerships at one time or another. Not currently at a Ford dealership but I can tell you that, without a doubt, Ford customers ARE the most loyal.

  • Report this Comment On April 08, 2013, at 4:43 PM, AmericanFirst wrote:

    I'm amazed at the ignorant comments made on this blog regarding Ford and their bailouts from the gov. The commerecial paper LOANS Ford recevied from the FED. were pentance compared to GM, and are being paid back with interest. Unlike GM who received an additional $100B in bailout funding / tax benefits where the gov. per Obamruptcy, took an equity stake (ownership). Thus far, GM has paid only approx. $13B "out of pocket" for $100B in benefits. The taxpayers will never recover their investment from GM or Chrysler, where Chrysler (Fiat) left the taxpayers with a $1.3B tab.

  • Report this Comment On April 09, 2013, at 5:46 AM, Anon0461 wrote:

    Responding about ignorant comments and you make an ignorant comment. lol. People would probably read and take you seriously if you talked like an adult. Obamruptcy? Hopefully, for your sake, you're just a teenager because that's embarrassing.

    Borrowed money is borrowed money. So, why do you and many others keep making excuses. Ford Motor Corp is on the Fed balance sheet whether you like it or not. The logic of most of you whining about who did what, and still try to ignore everyone took money.

  • Report this Comment On April 09, 2013, at 6:12 AM, Anon0461 wrote:

    You would think people would know reading comprehension by now. You all passed elementary, yes?

    "The Fed also lent $13 billion to investors who bought bonds backed by loans to new car buyers from automakers and banks. The Fed made clear that while investors got the loans, the move was meant to keep the lenders in business; the credit arms of Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Volkswagen, Honda and Hyundai all benefited directly."

    Separately, from the above $13 billion. This money below was still borrowed.

    "- Federal Reserve/Government Loans 2008-2009.

    Ford($15.9 Billion), GM($13.9 Billion),

    BMW($6.2 Billion), Chrysler($4.9 Billion),

    Toyota($4.6 Billion)."

    It seems as though ford fans still can't take their heads out their rears. Why do you all keep ignoring the facts? Well, considering 90% of you don't have money, it's starting to make more and more sense. Only the poor are 1 brand fanatics.

    Keep listing all your fake broken down pos stories. Nobody cares! The ignorance of americans is astonishing. The poor, and kids buy cheap imports. The delusionals buy cheap domestics.

    Your government is run by people just like you. You have no money. Just spend, spend, spend.

    All americans try to act like so many are below them. Yet, here you are financing things you can't afford. Just like your government.

    The fact that the poor are sitting here arguing about car brands and phony loyalty is hilarious. You can't buy a new car anyway, so be quiet. No, financing a car isn't considered being able to afford it either.

    Immigrant low-life's founded that country, now low-life's like all of you are taking it down. haha

    Such a highly advanced, educated civilization. Pathetic!

    I like it! Please...continue

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