Ask a Fool: Investment for the Young and Hip

In the following video, Motley Fool senior editor Dayana Yochim takes a question from a Fool reader, who asks, "Can you give some suggestions on how a young adult should invest his or her money?"

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  • Report this Comment On April 16, 2013, at 7:57 PM, Randy76 wrote:

    Sigh… for a young adult, all she can recommend is 3 technology driven stocks? Perhaps it would be wiser to diversify a bit to include some stable dividend producing stocks and let compounding to do its work over the long haul.

  • Report this Comment On April 17, 2013, at 11:43 AM, TMFLomax wrote:

    Randy76, Apple does have a dividend not to mention a very large stockpile of cash. I'm personally not a proponent of reducing that cash hoard by too much, but it looks like there are more hefty dividends to come from Apple.

    Either way, it's a great company in many ways.

    These are all also stocks that young people either use or understand and therefore good ones not only for the long haul but for young and beginning investors as they start portfolios. Many young people are also very interested in companies that are either green or going green.

    Some dividend payers may seem "stable" but are a) more difficult to understand b) extremely old school and c) challenged on actual business growth, maybe even funding dividends with debt. Every company has its complexities but the stocks Dayana mentions fit the Peter Lynch model of understanding your companies when you're starting out.

    You are right that diversification is helpful in any portfolio, but I think for young people starting out, this is a great way to open the door to more research, investing education, and eventual diversification.

    Just my two cents here. Thanks for bringing up the thought, since it is good for discussion on the topic.

    Best,

    Alyce

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