Tesla's 2013 Model S Is a Game-Changer

Photo credit: Tesla Gallery.

Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA  ) has been a mind-boggling topic of late. From its seemingly overnight appearance in the auto industry, which no one believed a start-up company could break into, to its three-month price jump from less than $40 a share to more than $100, consumers and investors can't get enough. Tesla and its founder, Elon Musk, have shaken up the industry with a revolutionary electric vehicle ... or luxury vehicle ... or is it both?

Whatever its segment niche is, as long as the Model S backs up the hype, the future is bright for Tesla, right? Perhaps that will be true, but automotive juggernauts Ford (NYSE: F  ) , General Motors (NYSE: GM  ) , and Toyota (NYSE: TM  ) will have a lot to say about that.

Let's check out some of the details and see if Tesla's Model S will remain a bright spot in the industry, or if it will be just a flash in the pan.

Overview and expectations
Consumer Reports labeled the car as nearly perfect, and one of the best cars it's ever tested -- awarding the Model S a score of 99 out of 100. Practically its only fault, if you can call it that, is the recharge time the car needs after driving long distances -- taking about six hours through a regular 240-volt outlet.

Tesla's nimble and exhilarating electric sports car didn't stop with just one award. It also took home Motor Trends "2013 Car of the Year." It was the first vehicle in the award's 64-year history to win without an internal combustion engine.

I know my saying "exhilarating electric sports car" might raise a few eyebrows. But consider that the sport-tuned Model S can accelerate from 0 to 60 in just 4.3 seconds -- pretty darn quick. Earlier this year, Automobile arranged a test for its magazine, and the Model S topped a 560-horsepower BMW M5 in a race to 100 MPH.

"It's the performance that won us over," Automobile Editor-in-Chief Jean Jennings had to say afterward, in the magazine's January 2013 issue. "The crazy speed builds silently and then pulls back the edges of your face. It had all of us endangering our licenses."

For some of us, it goes past what the Model S actually is, and more to what it represents. Detroit's Big Three have all seen their share of successes, as well as disasters -- more of the latter in recent years. While Ford has given us a reason to cheer a business that didn't take taxpayer funds in a bailout, it hasn't created anything truly revolutionary. Moreover, if two years ago we were asked which country's automakers would have the next breakthrough vehicle, "America's" probably wouldn't have been the answer. Tesla changed that, and it has given Americans reason to be proud and say that we can still innovate greatness. Few companies can say that with conviction, but Tesla and Apple both come to mind.

Tesla's Model S definitely lives up to the hype, in terms of performance, but let's take a look at the interior.


Interior of Tesla's 2013 Model S. Photo credit: Tesla Gallery.

The first thing that will catch your eye will definitely be the humongous 17-inch touchscreen. The first thing that will escape your mouth will be "wow." As your fingers immediately gravitate to the screen, you'll notice its functionality is as wide as the screen itself. At your fingertips are controls for HD radio, online radio, Internet, or Bluetooth, as well as navigation through Google Maps and controls for the glass roof. You can monitor the energy consumption during your trip as well as see what's behind you with the full HD backup camera. The list goes on, but we have other features to cover here.

One of my personal favorites in luxury rides is an all-glass panoramic roof, and the Model S delivers. According to Tesla, it's constructed from lightweight glass and can open wider than any other sedan's panoramic roof. 

In addition to the tech savvy and luxurious interior, I was completely surprised to learn it can fit five adults and two children. Its rear-facing child-seat option provides the space, and it's still optimized for safety. If you're looking for more storage space, the Model S offers a unique solution -- a drop-in center console. It slides into the existing space between front seats and can carry drinks or provide a place for phones and tablets.

To me, it's very clear that Tesla's Model S completely backs up the hype in every aspect and gives good old American innovation another leg to stand on. Consumers and critics are satisfied, but how about investors?

Investing takeaway
As I mentioned, Tesla's stock has been soaring over the past couple of months. Its rise has been fueled by the success of the Model S and the company's surprise quarterly profit.

I love the idea of Tesla as a long-term investment, but I'm not sure I'd buy in at this price. At today's lofty valuation, Tesla will be forced to report years of solid revenue and profit growth to justify its share price -- which it could very well do.

Let's not forget, however, the massive balance sheets and power of the globe's biggest automakers. Consider that Ford's F-Series -- America's best-selling vehicle for 31 years -- sold more than 640,000 vehicles last year, compared with Tesla's goal of selling just over 20,000 Model Ses this year.

Tesla has a breakthrough vehicle, no doubt about it, but it also isn't immune to copycat competition. If it goes mainstream instead of filling a luxurious niche, global automakers easily have the balance sheets to rapidly develop a vehicle to compete.

Tesla's future indeed may be bright, but the only thing guaranteed in investing is that it will surely hit a speed bump along the way -- and that may be a better point to jump on for an investment.

Tesla has captured the attention of investors across the nation, but is it positioned for the biggest automotive growth trend? A recent Motley Fool report, "2 Automakers to Buy for a Surging Chinese Market," names two global giants poised to reap big gains that could drive big rewards for investors. You can read this report right now for free -- just click here for instant access.


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  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 2:50 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    "Tesla has a breakthrough vehicle, no doubt about it, but it also isn't immune to copycat competition. If it goes mainstream instead of filling a luxurious niche, global automakers easily have the balance sheets to rapidly develop a vehicle to compete."

    Elon Musk has already stated multiple times publicly that the Gen 3 car will be "High Volume, Low Cost" - mass market solution.

    Ford, GM, BMW and MBZ can compete. But all 4 rely on their top of the line cars for profits and Tesla is already bleeding much of that away. All 4 will have to write off their engine and transmission divisions, automate their production lines, eliminate their dealers, fire 80% of the UAW workers, drop their advertising and marketing budgets and design great EV's, in order to get their cost structures into position to compete for the coming day when the S model pricing starts dropping. I just don't see the big automakers able to respond -- too much baggage...

    Personally, I think all 4 are presently in the same position as Kodak was when consumers realized they don't have to buy film (gas), anymore...

    Of course, the real reason Tesla will be very successful in the mass market is that F, GM, TM, MBZ and BMW don't have Elon Musk.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 2:51 PM, jacobandersen72 wrote:

    given that Obama gave them a $500 million dollar loan I wouldnt call Tesla a startup

    if you call tesla a startup you should call every time a new car is introduced a startup too.

    seriously....

    what entrerprenuer wouldnt like a NO-COLLATERAL $500,000,000 LOAN !!!!!!!!!!

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 2:54 PM, airroll wrote:

    The investers have spoken Tesla stock is almost the same as Toyota's Because Toyota made its money by using American designs in their cars and trucks and forcing our loser car manufacterors to take their weird designs and put them in our cars by way of American greed those greedy CEO's are long gone and all that's left is GM and Ford and the shell of what you get after the greedy have left and even after a bail out GM to this day is still on the path of Bankruptcy Its like the Texas solar panel boom 99 percent of Texas is hot sunny yet there is no solar panels because they found oil there and Detroit is were they invented the first car factories and they don't produce a single electrical car even thought they have the best mechanics in the world Detroit could have a come back into the days of its former glory if they decided to make a electric car for the masses but they would rather but a 350 into a new body form and call it new instead of really using their heads No one is gonna hand Detroit a way out! they will have to do it themselves or just watch California take the title of Auto kings by way of knock out .

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 2:57 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    I'll wait to see the Gen 3 "high volume, low cost" materialize before banking on it to defeat automakers that have been around over a hundred years.

    During that 100 years Ford/GM and others have faced much larger threats than what Tesla represents. If it was such a future end all change, we would have witnessed Ford and GM's stock plunge as Tesla's more than doubled -- didn't happen. Know why it didn't happen? Because Tesla has a long, long, long way to go before it can think about forcing Ford/GM to its knees.

    Like I said, I love Tesla as a long term investment. But saying it's going to dominate and kill the global juggernaut automakers is too much right now.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:07 PM, digi1248 wrote:

    since about 1912 when the first electric car was made, there has been one problem that remains the same today, "batteries!" I can't afford to stop every 4 hours and recharge my batteries. I don't have the time. you've got to get at least 350 mile out of a charge and then be able to recharge or change out the batteries in less than 15 minutes before this system is ever going to work.Or you could just spend $40,000.00 to drive short trips around town.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:10 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    The Model S used by Drag Times in this test is the most powerful and highest performance model from the electric car maker. Besides the 416 hp, the Model S generates 443 ft-lbs. pf toque (its weight is 4,700 lbs). It went from 0-60 in 3.9 seconds and averaged just over 111 mph for the duration of the quarter-mile.

    And why would you want a Corvette anymore?

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:10 PM, Soflason wrote:

    The good folks at Motley Fool keep making this assumption, including in this article: "Tesla has a breakthrough vehicle, no doubt about it, but it also isn't immune to copycat competition. If it goes mainstream instead of filling a luxurious niche, global automakers easily have the balance sheets to rapidly develop a vehicle to compete."

    Question: if this is the case, why has Tesla been able to do things ALL other car manufacturers haven't?

    How has Tesla, with it's first car built from the ground-up won Automobile, Yahoo Autos, and Motor Trend Car of the Year?

    Why has Tesla scored the highest Consumer Reports rating ever?

    Why has Tesla been able to become profitable a few months after the Model S was released?

    Why has Tesla been able to pay down its loan nine years in advance and have a stock market run so fast?

    What other automotive CEO (Elon Musk also runs SpaceX) has reduced the cost of rockets ten-fold - bettering what the U.S. and Russia ha tried for in decades?

    If the automotive press, Consumer Reports, and the investing public believes this is a true game-changer... if Elon Musk can transform rockets (after changing e-commerce forever with Paypal)... don't assume the other car manufacturers can pllay catch-up... they can't.

    Your title here is correct. Don't make false assumptions in the conclusion of the piece. Tesla is a game-changer.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:11 PM, mottledtool wrote:

    GM and Ford have proven over and over that they will only be as good as the competition forces them to be. Toyota has great build quality but like most Japanese car companies they wait for others to innovate and then they emulate. All of this puts Tesla into a position to be the EV industry leader. Musk clearly has the vision to know what consumers will want before they themselves know it. The so-called juggernauts are more like lumbering dinosaurs. The big question is not if the big car companies can get better. The big question is whether Tesla can stay nimble and innovative as it becomes a large car company itself. Very much like Apple, as long as they have a visionary at the helm I believe that they will.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:14 PM, ARealPerson wrote:

    These Tesla articles are getting extremely annoying. Everyday there's something published. A new article everyday. It is suspect. Mr. Musk, Are you paying your way to the top?

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:14 PM, hardrawd wrote:

    "given that Obama gave them a $500 million dollar loan I wouldnt call Tesla a startup

    if you call tesla a startup you should call every time a new car is introduced a startup too.

    seriously....

    what entrerprenuer wouldnt like a NO-COLLATERAL $500,000,000 LOAN !!!!!!!!!!"

    Very few entrepreneurs start without ANY kind of loan. The # of 0's that follow the first digit are in proportion to the magnitude of the project, ie the "start-up".

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:20 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    Ford stock is at $15. Same as in 1988. 25 years of no stock appreciation is no different than plunging, hmmm? You disagree? Then go ahead and put your money on Ford and send us a PDF copy of the trade confirmation. Put your money where your mouth is or shut up.

    As for Bankrupt Motors, the stock price story is even worse than Ford.

    ALL vehicles will become electric. Darwin's law kicks in when you compare 95MPG EPA rated Tesla V to any car anywhere. Have you seen the Tesla EV? There is essentially nothing to maintain except shock absorbers and brakes. There's nothing else, no transmission, no engine, no exhaust system, no radiator, etc etc etc.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:20 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    The Model S used by Drag Times in this test is the most powerful and highest performance model from the electric car maker. Besides the 416 hp, the Model S generates 443 ft-lbs. pf toque (its weight is 4,700 lbs). It went from 0-60 in 3.9 seconds and averaged just over 111 mph for the duration of the quarter-mile.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:21 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    @Soflason

    To answer your "Question: if this is the case, why has Tesla been able to do things ALL other car manufacturers haven't?"

    Simply because Ford/GM/Toyota are all global automakers, as such, they don't focus their R&D on niche items that are just barely profitable. That's what happens in business, a young company will create something innovative because of their need to find a strength/niche in the market. Then the big boys watch and learn, wait for it to be profitable to the masses, and then they buy it out or copy it cheaply.

    When the "high volume, low cost" vehicle is available -- and it will be at some point -- then we'll see how the big boys react. It isn't that they can't, it's that their focus is elsewhere. In two years fixing Europe or growing in China will be worth as much as $4 billion to Ford's BOTTOM line. I wonder what Tesla's bottom line will be in two years? See why their focus isn't where Tesla's is?

    It takes nothing away from how remarkable the Model S is, but we have to compare company goals and visions. They aren't the same right now.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:22 PM, jamesdan567 wrote:

    The Model S used by Drag Times in this test is the most powerful and highest performance model from the electric car maker.

    Besides the 416 hp, the Model S generates 443 ft-lbs. pf toque (its weight is 4,700 lbs). It went from 0-60 in 3.9 seconds and averaged just over 111 mph for the duration of the quarter-mile.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:22 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    @jamesdan567

    See the disclosure, I already own a huge chunk of Ford... My money is always where my mouth is.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:25 PM, SLTom992 wrote:

    Why all of this positive stuff about a total loss?

    The base price of the Tesla is MUCH higher than it's competition. There is no way to charge these things on the road as you can fill your gas tank virtually in the smallest town in the nation or even out along highways.

    It takes 10 minutes to enter a gas station, fill up and leave. A half charge on a Tesla takes 20 minutes IF you have a fast charge station of which there are perhaps several dozen planned. Otherwise you're looking at several hours. So that half-charge effectively cuts the quoted range in half.

    Lithium-Ion batteries are good for between 300 and 500 full recharges before they require replacement. This means that in full use you need to replace the battery packs between 1 and 3 years. And the present cost of the pack is $12,000 and is like to go up and not down.\

    I can see nothing whatsoever good about an electric car whose main claim to fame is that it doesn't use gasoline.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 3:58 PM, Jonathane1 wrote:

    Funny, but I'm not reading in the article how Tesla's profit has come from selling carbon credits to other automakers. Sure it's nice to have a goal of being revenue positive without selling the carbon credits and its nice to have a goal of selling 20,000 cars and its nice to have a goal of making a cheaper version but until these things come about, I'll hold my excitement.

    Someone else mentioned lithium-ion battery life span, which hardly ever is mentioned is these feel good pieces as well.

    Until a lot of these things can be over come, excuse me if I don't get all worked up and excited about a goal.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 4:01 PM, stevenatorr wrote:

    you are wrong about 1 thing "While Ford has given us a reason to cheer a business that didn't take taxpayer funds in a bailout" they took $$ and asked for a $6 billion credit line along with previous loans they have. stop lying about fail ford. fed are not required by law to disclose that info. ford HAD to take it or risk shutting down. ALL auto makers took $$. only thing helping ford stay alive is mazda. ford is basically mazda junk. i have owned ford and am ashemed they are called american. i will own a pedal bike before i would buy a POS ford.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 4:02 PM, kimdi01 wrote:

    You are on I-10 heading west in your battery powered car. You have passes Sonora and looking forward to reaching El Paso before dark. You left San Antonio this morning and have already traveled 170 miles with ONLY 385 more to go. Just where do you plug in?

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 4:09 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    @stevenatorr

    No, I'm not wrong and I have no idea where you heard that $6 billion credit line for Ford was in bailout or TARP funds -- it was not.

    That $6 billion was a government loan to develop Obama's fuel efficient vision of vehicles -- like the Ford C-MAX. Other automakers took this loan as well, just not quite as much.

    Ford did not need the $6 billion to stop from shutting down, that's a ridiculously false and lazy argument. Ford had cut costs enough to turn a profit in 2009, months after GM and Chrysler received bailout money -- Ford didn't need it.

    You're spreading terrible ignorance, you should reconsider.

    P.S. Ford doesn't own Mazda, might want to update and double check your "facts".

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 5:07 PM, TeslaSisSlow wrote:

    @jamesdan567

    You really need to get your facts straight. Ford, GM, BMW, and MB do not rely on their top of the line cars for profits. If they did then they would no longer be in business. You might want to check Drag Times again for the numbers on the Tesla S. It's best 1/4 mile time was 12.371@110.84 mph. Not just above 111mph. The base Corvette has a better time than that and you don't have to wait 3 hours for it to fully charge. Not to mention it can go a lot farther than the claimed 300 miles that the Tesla S can.

    After that being said, I actually do like the Tesla S and would like to have one but not for the price they are asking. It does have some impressive numbers for what it is but you really shouldn't even try to compare it to a Corvette. That's comparing apples to oranges.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 5:13 PM, TexasJax wrote:

    I have driven many miles in battery operated equipment, fork lifts, golf carts, boats and scooters and have consistently found that each full battery use and recharge diminishes the reliability of the battery's life markedly. Has technology made sufficient advancements in that area or will the batteries used in the Tesla S succumb to use? If you can afford the Tesla - surely that will not be more than a nag at some point -but what about vehicle resale, repair or replacement? All in all, it's pretty impressive.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 5:18 PM, TelsaRowe wrote:

    Unreal. The propaganda machine keeps a churnin. The Model S is a great car but no more of a game changer than the prius, volt, fusion or Karma. Quite frankly i think Tesla will follow Fisker to bankruptcy over the next few years. The excitement for Fisker was just like this years ago with multiple articles a day like this one when the Karma was first released. Laughable. The big auto industry will release their EV's over the next 24 months before Tesla even gets the chance to release their affordable EV. Short the stock.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 5:25 PM, TelsaRowe wrote:

    Article is written by yet another idiot who bought grossly overpriced shares before thinking and is now authoring articles to try and justify his idiocy. When this initial Fisker type 'pump' fades so will the stock, company and overhyped product. Get real.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 5:29 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    @TelsaRowe

    I guess you had trouble reading the ending, so I'll sum it up. I think the share price is indeed way too high, and I wouldn't buy in now. (I specifically said that). Also, you're incorrect, I never bought into Tesla and don't need to write articles to pump the stock.

    In fact, my entire article was themed after your first sentence " The Model S is a great car " but maybe not a great investment at this price.

    Thanks for reading, I gotta go "Get real".

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 8:17 PM, Soflason wrote:

    @telsarowe - you say "short the stock" - "another Fisker" - well... good luck being uninformed. I keep counting money while you keep getting squeezed by Elon Musk. Piece of advice: wait until June 20th when Elon has his big announcement. Might save you some money.

    @TMFtwocoins - first new automaker in nearly 90 years to become a breakout hit with its FIRST car built from the ground up, and it's electric! C'mon... the big boys have been sitting on the sidelines chummy with big oil and Tesla is eating their lunch. The street gets it.

    WSJ just wrote about their cross country Supercharger network -- they're building the cars and the infrastructure all at once... they wrote: its been better to be Exxon Mobil than GM the past 100 years and Tesla is being BOTH for the electric vehicle future... the big boys sleep on this and before you know it, Tesla will be like Netflix and big auto will be like Blockbuster. Have fun returning your videotapes.

    They keep building their ICE cars while Tesla perfects EVs. It's like how Sony stuck to its Walkman while Apple began to change everything with iPod. And then created iTunes to own the songs and the player. How is Sony's stock doing vs. Apple?

    Look what happened to Kodak as they denied digital photography was the future?

    Look, Elon Musk builds rockets (a bit more complex than cars) so well that NASA flys most its missions using his company. Oh, btw he's also chairman of Solar City that has reduced solar costs industry-wide.... ummm, and he's using his solar capability to power his "gas stations" - the supercharger network, he's building nationwide. You'll soon be driving a Tesla powered by sunshine.

    Be careful, the big boys are stuck in their ways, and a new player, changing the game entirely, has come to town. Place your bets carefully.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 8:26 PM, TMFTwoCoins wrote:

    @Soflason

    I respect your opinion, and it seems pretty well informed. I just hesitate to compare the auto industry to a tech industry where technology and innovation replace and kill companies within two years. That just doesn't happen in the auto industry, even with a breakthrough like Tesla, ICE engines will still be the dominate force of change and upgrades for the next 5-10 years. During that time frame there is no doubt in my mind the big boys will take notice and slowly position them for the trend change. Can Tesla continue to innovate its way ahead? It's definitely possible, I'm just not so sure yet. And since I'm not sure, this is a lofty price to buy into Tesla -- however great its future potential may be.

    That's just my cautious opinion, but it takes nothing away from how great the Model S is. One thing is for sure, the next 5 or so years will be very, very interesting in the auto industry.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 8:57 PM, Soflason wrote:

    @TMFTwoCoins

    I respect being cautious, especially when investing. Important to do your homework on something before sinking hard-earned money into a shiny new company like TSLA.

    I picked up an iPhone and I was holding the future. I'm very fiscally conservative and rarely bet big on any stock. But I liked Steve Jobs, a bit brash yet he was a bold visionary -- and I saw a product, the iPhone, that was going to change everything. I bet big on Apple and it's done me pretty nicely.

    I test-drove a Tesla and I was driving the future. Elon Musk almost makes Steve Jobs look like an underachiever... Paypal, SpaceX, Solar City, and Tesla and he's in his early forties. I placed a big bet on Tesla. This is the second big bet I've placed in a lifetime. Chances like this don't come often.

    Everyone drives cars. Nice to buy a car made in the USA that doesn't rely on foreign oil and silently outclasses EVERYTHING else on the road.

    Do your homework, go to a Tesla Store and test-drive one.

    Then, watch this National Geographic documentary on Elon, Tesla, and their factory:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XsamTWakrc&feature=playe...

    Saying Tesla is just another carmaker is like saying Amazon is just another book store. I remember folks saying how the behemoth, Barnes & Nobles, would crush Jeff Bezos... not so fast.

    Trust me, take a test-drive... it's a blast. And watch that special, it's quality stuff you'd expect from NatGeo. Then, buy and hold TSLA. It will be bumpy, ups and downs. But, trust me - it will be fun to watch your investment grow over the next 5-10 year horizon.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 11:33 PM, FordRules wrote:

    The only arguments in favor of Tesla's rich man's toys usually revolve around gee-whiz fans who watch too much "Big Bang Theory" and call anybody who says anything negative about their cars (including price) "Luddites". If not for the hybrids from major automakers which don't cost Ferrari prices, electric cars would lose out due to price, logistics (such as where do you plug them in, how does the owner cope with the draw that heating and AC puts on the battery, etc.), energy infrastructure, you name it. Just watch this discussion thread and you'll read a lot of howling about "certain people" being stuck in the 1800s. Well, this "certain person" can't afford a car that costs more than my condo and I couldn't use routinely like I do my 'Stang convertible. Many cars are status symbols, but not everybody can afford a status symbol or a statement of "Lookee how modern I am, aren't I wonderful" when what the vast majority of us need is transportation.

  • Report this Comment On June 16, 2013, at 11:56 PM, Soflason wrote:

    @FordRules - got it. But you can maybe afford a few shares of TSLA. (But, not for long if it keeps skyrocketing.)

    And in three years, there will be a $30-$40k Gen 3 Tesla (nickname: Bluestar) along with a nationwide network of supercharging stations to charge your car. For free. You read that right... for free.

    And, that's just for long trips. Everyday driving can be accompanied by NO gas station stops, ever.

    Simply pull into your garage after work, plug your car in - same way you do for your cell phone or laptop - wake up... and your "tank" is full for 1/5 the cost of gasoline.

    It's a sleek, tech-savvy vehicle, can't argue that -- but soon it will be the only smart mode of transport that provides a superior driving experience with better economics.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 12:07 AM, anniewyers wrote:

    "Wardenclyffe" Tower 1913. 1) Sun - Ionosphere - Wardenclyffe Vortex 2) ULF Di-Electric Longitudinal waves created by a) Sending resonant coil & step-up voltage & frequency with a Receiving resonant coil attached to a b) Low voltage, room temp, no flickr resonant Mercury-Gas bulbs c) Negative Resistance in bulbs allow the receiver to run off of the sender attached to a Light, Motor or Battery 3) The 1911 Tesla Turbine using underground or added Air/Water Pressure 4) 500 ft deep so-called "Spiral Staircase" connected to Long Island's aquifer 5) The sixteen (4X4 Organ) hollow metal tubes dug 420 ft into ground/water to send ULF frequencies @ 1-2HZ through the ground, a resonant cavity 6) 1914 Tesla Fountain effect connected to the Westinghouse 100-300KW generator/pump 7) Di-Electric Resonant Electrolysis, capturing Hydrogen and Oxygen. 8) Tesla's 1917 Patent for Lightning Protection/Capture. https://plus.google.com/u/0/104097219404911365762/posts

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 12:08 AM, anniewyers wrote:

    Morgan finally replies to Tesla through his secretary on October 14, 1904, that "it will be impossible for [me/ Morgan] to do anything in the matter". I have more original creations named after me than any other man that has gone before me not excepting Archimedes and Galileo -- the giants of invention. Six thousand million dollars ( 6 Trillion Dollars) are invested in enterprises based upon my discoveries in the United States today. Nikola Tesla, having already blundered, makes things worse by stating that: He is in need of more funds because of the 1907 financial panic which "you" (Morgan) had initiated. Tesla tells Morgan that if he had built Wardencylffe at Niagara Falls (Updated with Tesla's 1911 "Tesla Turbine" Technology), as was Rankine's suggestion (a partner in the Tesla Electric Company and head of the Niagara Power Company) it would be operable by now. 1/13/1904 - http://www.teslatech.info/ttmagazine/v4n1/seifer.htm

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 3:38 AM, crash3085 wrote:

    I'm voting for "game changer" as the most over used term for 2013. I'm ready to hurl...

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 4:10 AM, VintageV12 wrote:

    When competitors start promoting the downside os batteries, and the huge carbon footprint of lithium it'll be over.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 8:16 AM, 35whelen wrote:

    Electric cars as viable market competitors is a farce. They get huge Gov. subsidies and the buyers get big tax deductions to purchase. Until they can reach the market without being just another Gov./welfare program, thus a drain on me, "they" have no legitimate place in the market. A Nancy Pelosi stepchild does not a company make.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 8:17 AM, djplong wrote:

    "I cant afford to stop every 4 hours" - How often are you on such long trips and the $50-$75 per tank doesn't affect you much? With a 250-mile range, based on my last year of driving, I would have needed to stop for recharging on ONE trip to VA from NH. The idea of never having to stop at a gas station because you're always leaving your garage with a full tank is something a lot of people fail to consider.

    "Costs more than the competition" - The competition is not the Volt, Leaf or Focus EV. It's the higher end Mercedes, Audi or BMW.

    "$500 million loan!" - Paid nine years early. ...and Ford too - a nearly $6B loan from that program (enacted by Bush) that is still outstanding.

    "..are good for between 300 and 500 full recharges before they require replacement ... 1 and 3 years ... $12,000 and is like to go up" - False. That might be true for your notebook battery, but Tesla Roadster owners (on the road since 2008), Prius owners and many others are out there, in the field, proving that wrong. So that's more than 5 years right there. And check the prices - the batteries are going DOWN in price 10-15% per year.

    "Fisker type pump" - except that Fisker isn't selling drivetrains to Toyota and Mercedes, hasn't release TWO fully-functional cars (that don't burst into flames), isn't building out an electric recharging infrastructure, had profits, owns it's own IP and, most importantly, hasn't built a car since last year - unlike Tesla who are building several hundred a week.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 9:45 AM, Billiardman wrote:

    I am an owner of a Model S. This is not my only car. I have 2 others. A Lexus and a Lincoln SUV. I almost never put on more than 75 miles in any given day. I would not recommend a Model S as anyone's only vehicle at this time. But there are hundreds of thousands of people just like me. I use this car every day. I have my SUV for when there is snow on the ground or if I have to haul something. If I need to travel more distance than the battery will take me, I'll just use another car. If Musk is successful building out his Super Charging Stations around the country, he could own the auto industry. Tesla owners can recharge for free...forever. Battery technology will certainly improve in the next 5 to 10 years. They will get cheaper, recharge faster and go further.

    Let me be clear. An all electric car probably shouldn't be your only car. But as a 2nd or 3rd car, it's awesome. I plug it in twice a week and never have to stop for gas. I've owned more than 20 cars in my life. This is by far the best car I've ever owned. If you haven't driven a Model S, you simply don't know, what you don't know.

  • Report this Comment On June 17, 2013, at 11:06 AM, StanO6 wrote:

    "no doubt about it, but it also isn't immune to copycat competition."

    Yep! That's why Ford builds a copycat Corvette. Chevy builds a copycat Prius. Hyundai builds a copycat Ferrari F50.

    /sarcasm

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