Can Microsoft's Xbox Music Beat Pandora and iTunes?

Over the weekend, Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT  ) launched iOS and Android apps for its Xbox Music streaming service, and it added free unlimited streaming for Web users to boot.

Microsoft hopes users will stream, discover, and download music from its service, but with Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL  ) and Pandora (NYSE: P  ) already dominating downloads and streaming, the Windows maker may be out of its league.

Xbox Music. Source: Microsoft.

Battling Pandora's growth
Pandora is one of the world's leading Internet radio services, boasting 1.35 billion hours of listening just last month. That's right -- more than 1 billion hours streamed in just one month. That figure is up about 16% from the same time last year.

And it's not just listening hours. Active Pandora listeners totaled 72.1 million last month, up 28% year over year, and its share of U.S. radio listening increased to 7.46% from 6.3% year over year.

In blog post, the Microsoft said it created Xbox Music a year ago to provide "an all-in-one music service that gives you the independence to stream music for free, subscribe to all the music you want, or download to own your favorite songs. And it's all integrated across your tablet, PC, phone, and TV."

Why is this ambition bad for Microsoft? The company simply doesn't have enough mobile mindshare to woo users to its streaming service.

Streaming against the tide
Windows tablets made up just 4.5% of all tablet market share in the second quarter of 2013, and Microsoft's own Surface tablets accounted for only 15% of that figure. Meanwhile, the Windows Phone OS holds 3.7% of smartphone OS market share. With Microsoft's low mobile OS penetration, it's going to be difficult to convince mobile users that they should look to Xbox Music for all their mobile music needs.

If that weren't enough, Apple will officially launch its iTunes Radio service with the new iOS 7 tomorrow. The new service will bring Apple squarely into music streaming, which adds to its already dominant position in downloadable music. Although Apple changed the digital music world with iTunes and the iPod about a decade ago, the company is nowhere near a sure bet in the streaming space, when pitted against Pandora and Spotify. Consequently, Microsoft can expect an even harder time.

iTunes Radio. Source: Apple. 

Microsoft is trying to capitalize on the Xbox reputation with Xbox Music, and with good reason. Xbox has been a shining star in the dim universe of Microsoft's product releases as of late. But despite the company's push into mobile music streaming, investors should be realistic about Microsoft's potential in the market. Taking on Apple, Pandora and Spotify clearly won't be an easy task, and it doesn't help that consumers fail to see Microsoft as a top mobile contender.

Investors should keep a close eye on how fast the Redmond company can grow Xbox Music subscribers and then compare that to iTunes Radio subscribers, when the figures become available. If the new Xbox One comes with a free subscription to Xbox Music, and sells millions of devices, then the company may be able to jump start the service with the console. But giving away free subscriptions is much easier than getting people to pay a monthly subscription fee -- and right now I can't see why users would want to pay Microsoft over Pandora, or even Apple.

Even with Apple releasing its new mobile OS and likely a new iPhone this week, some investors have been skeptical of the company as of late. In order for Apple's stock to soar again, a few critical things need to fall into place. In The Motley Fool's special free report, "5 Secrets to Apple's Future," we outline the key factors every Apple investor needs to watch. Just click here now for your free report.


Read/Post Comments (3) | Recommend This Article (0)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On September 09, 2013, at 8:21 PM, techy46 wrote:

    XBox Music doen't need to beat anybody it just needs to be an competitive product for Microsoft devices and owners of multple platforms.

  • Report this Comment On September 10, 2013, at 5:36 AM, Henry3Dogg wrote:

    @techy46

    But when did Microsoft last manage to release any completely new product that was competitive?

    There is a reason that the market knocked 15 billion off Microsoft when it announced that it was paying 5 billion for Nokia. The market knows that Microsoft is incapable of doing anything new.

    Still, I guess selling eMusic you can't be stuck with a billion dollar write down on unsold stock.

    It's time MS concentrated on keeping its existing customers happy if it wants to continue milking them.

  • Report this Comment On September 10, 2013, at 8:44 AM, Bunnyking77 wrote:

    If you can't get the music out of the XBOX and into a portable device at will, then what good is it?

    We've seen the crazy DRM policies they wanted to introduce/force on their consumers, why would they be so gracious to let music on and off their devices?

Add your comment.

DocumentId: 2629383, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 7/30/2014 7:55:00 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement