Motley Fool Motor Money: Tesla vs. GM

Watch out Tesla: General Motors is working on a $30,000 all-electric vehicle. Volkswagen could soon have an all-turbo lineup. And the federal government is close to closing out its position in GM. What does it all mean for investors?

These are the topics Rex Moore and John Rosevear tackle on this week's edition of Motor Money.

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  • Report this Comment On September 25, 2013, at 11:57 AM, ffbj wrote:

    Very well done and well presented by knowledgeable participants. I was somewhat disappointed that the interviewee was recalcitrant to anoint a probable dominant technology in the future,say in 5 year increments. While I agree that many types of extent engine technologies will continue to be used, turbo, diesel, ng, hydrogen fuel cell, will still be around, since existent service for some of them will enable them to stick around. Others have specific application benefits in regards to pricing. i.e. lng for long-haul trucking.

    Anyway I think electrics will gradually capture more and more of the market. A microcosmic example of this is: Tsla sold approx: 8% of all cars sold in Norway from the middle of August till the middle of September. Of course you could call that anomalous, and you would be correct, although I think this instance points something out that is really is the bottom line. People will buy electric cars if they are good enough because in the long run they are cheaper. Tesla harps on this point repeatedly. They can also be made safer.

    (safest car ever tested)

    Tesla also is installing the super-charger network, which incidentally only works with Tesla, and they are free, and they are building them along freeway corridors, near, but not too near major metropolitan areas. across the country, and now in Europe, and eventually worldwide. So this addresses the range anxiety problem.

    Hybrids are a bridge technology which will certainly still be around, as we transition to a mostly electric transportation system. A process that I think will take decades to come to full fruition, perhaps 30 years all told. Hybrids are ok but they have 2 engines, and while they do give essentially unlimited range thats not something everyone needs, they also give you more mileage, so you do get something back fro the premium price you pay for them.

    I can see Ford..GM..etc.. making a 30k electric...that could go 200mi...afertall they are working on it.

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