Stock Markets Surge Higher on Possible Debt Ceiling Hike

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Stock markets around the world today are up as House Speaker John Boehner suggested a debt ceiling hike that would be enough to pay the government's bills for six weeks, which is enough time to negotiate an agreement and avoid a debt ceiling disaster. As of 1:15 p.m. EDT the S&P 500 (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC  ) was up 27 points to 1,682, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI  ) was up 227 points to 15,030.

After a meeting with the Republican leadership earlier today, Boehner told reporters that Republicans will offer a plan to President Obama that would raise the debt ceiling for six weeks. Boehner did not offer any plan for ending the government shutdown, saying, "That's a conversation we're going to have with the president today." The House Republican leadership is set to meet with Obama this afternoon. Obama has said he wants any extension to include the reopening of the government.

Stocks are reacting as if it's a done deal and are being led higher by financials, which would be the worst affected by a government default. Leading the S&P 500 today is JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM  ) , up 2.5%, followed by Citigroup (NYSE: C  ) and Bank of America (NYSE: BAC  ) both up more than 2%.

Economists estimate that for every week the government is closed, GDP growth will be lowered by 0.1 to 0.15 percentage points. The effects of the shutdown can already be seen in today's unemployment claims report:

 Report

Period

Result

Previous

New unemployment claims

Sept. 28 to Oct. 5

374,000

308,000

Unemployment claims jumped by 66,000 to a six-month high, and the less volatile four-week moving average jumped 20,000 to 325,000.

US Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance Chart

US Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance data by YCharts.

Furloughed federal employees were not eligible to claim unemployment last week, but depending on the state they reside in, many will be able to claim unemployment benefits this week. The jump in unemployment claims is the result of companies laying off employees because of the shutdown, including Dow component United Technologies. Unemployment claims will likely continue to spike next week as furloughed government employees become eligible.

We are less than two weeks into the shutdown; if it lasted another six weeks, we'd be looking at a total hit to GDP growth of somewhere between 0.8 and 1.2 percentage points. That's a deep blow, considering GDP growth was 2.5% in the second quarter, but it's nowhere near so bad as what would happen if Congress allowed the country to actually default on its obligations.

If Obama does accept the offer, hopefully Congress uses the opportunity to come to some agreement and doesn't just keep kicking the can down the road every six weeks.

What can you do?
In both the public and private sectors, governance functions best when stakeholders educate themselves, take an active interest in what's going on, and hold their representatives accountable.

You can educate yourself by reading The Motley Fool's new free report, "Everything You Need to Know About the National Debt," which provides step-by-step explanations about how the government spends your money, where it gets tax revenue from, the future of spending, and what a $16 trillion debt means for our future. Click here to read the full report!


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  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2013, at 2:07 PM, jce3227 wrote:

    Do they really want to discuss the debts and deficits with a sense of reality, or do they just want to cut more social programs again? The only way to seriously balance the budget on a serious level is to, Yes, of course cut spending drastically, including the military budget, and raise taxes and tax revenues on everyone and everything. The Republicans don't want to discuss reality, they want to discuss, cutting social programs even more, while the wealthiest amongst us continue to pay a lesser overall percentage than everyone else. And of course, we all know, they want to discuss de funding the ACA, which in reality will help generate massive tax revenues, in the form of medical devices, that could actually help balance this budget. So fine, let's discuss this yet again, for the 300 trillionth time, but can we live in the real world this time please? There is no balancing this budget without tax increases and spending cuts, combined with increased revenues. And that's the sad truth, whether the Republicans want to say it or not. And the truth also is, unlike some things where people just say that both parties are responsible, just to appear independent, when in reality the problem is just the Republicans. when it comes to the debt and deficits, both parties are responsible. Republican presidents and congresses probably have about 54% of the blame by the exact numbers, and the Democratic presidents and congresses probably have the remaining 46%, with a margin of error of plus or minus 5 pts on both sides. LOL..

  • Report this Comment On October 10, 2013, at 5:51 PM, mofo22 wrote:

    You nailed it! Will you run 4 President please jce3227? Smart, sensible w/ a sense of humor.

    Serious about the deficit? Then we all gotta help out, right? arrrrggghhh ,...I know the thought, omg,...esp. those of us w/ golden 'chutes making 1000% more than workers and sponging off SS too,....and mid class, help us out, no jobs, so yur sponging off disability when unemployment runs out. and the poor folks, you'll have to cut back on caviar, champagne and, Hamburger Helper, so help out, eh? Desperate times need,..you know.

    One word. Infrastructure.

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