Back in May, investors applauded SodaStream International (NASDAQ:SODA) after the at-home carbonation specialist outlined goals for not only reaching at least $1 billion in revenue by 2016 -- or an 80% increase over its current run rate at the time -- but also for eventually grabbing at least 10% household penetration in every country it enters.

And why not? SodaStream had already achieved at least 10% in four countries, including 25% in Sweden, 13% in both Finland and Czech Republic, and 10% in Israel.

Better yet, SodaStream still had less than 1% household penetration in the massive U.S. market. And with more than 115 million households in the U.S. right now, let it suffice to say SodaStream could reward investors handsomely if it can achieve even a fraction of its goals.

SodaStream is well on its way, as revenue from the Americas alone grew 29% year over year to nearly $50 million last quarter. Now, the company is right in the thick of its crucial holiday season, when it hopes it can capitalize on the gift-worthiness of its flagship products.

Sodastream

SodaStream Source soda makers. Source: SodaStream.

How does 46% sound?
But from an investors' perspective, what would you think if almost half of all American households were interested in owning a SodaStream machine?

Because that's exactly what SodaStream implied in a press release this morning, which detailed the results of an online survey of more than 2,000 American adults. Specifically, the survey was conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of SodaStream to explore "gifting behaviors and trends for 2013, as well as what beverages consumers plan to enjoy this holiday season."

As it turns out, while coffee makers unsurprisingly proved the most wished-for kitchen appliance this year, Harris found 46% of all respondents indicated they would enjoy receiving a SodaStream machine as a gift this year, including 51% of all men and 42% of women.

Of course, it's hard to assume the online opinions of "just" 2,000 people are absolutely indicative of the entire population, but on the surface it seems reasonable enough.

In fact, my family's current situation is strikingly similar; Just last week, for example, when we purchased a Keurig brewer for my father-in-law (I hope he doesn't read this before Christmas), I noticed a SodaStream end-cap nearby and told my wife I wouldn't mind getting one. She disagreed, saying she'd prefer to reserve the shelf space for something else.

But in any case, those survey results certainly aren't discouraging, and you can bet SodaStream is doing all it can to push more wavering consumers off the fence. If that involves convincing more people to purchase a SodaStream machine for their friends and family this Christmas, so be it.

Foolish final thoughts
Going forward, it's also worth noting SodaStream has every intention of bringing down the price of its machines to make its long-term value proposition all that much more attractive. In fact, while the least expensive units currently retail for around $79, CEO Daniel Birnbaum asserted back in October his "dream is to have a $49 price point," at which Wal-Mart would undoubtedly be "selling a tremendous [number] of soda makers."

Lucky for today's investors, shares of SodaStream -- a fast-growing, $1 billion company -- are currently trading for just 15.6 times next year's estimated earnings and sit 34% below their 52-week-high. For some perspective, shares of the much slower-growing beverage behemoths Coca Cola and PepsiCo both currently trade for more than 17 times their respective next year's earnings.

That's why, with all things considered and as SodaSteam's economies of scale kick in, I remain convinced SodaStream stock is a fantastic bet for long-term investors who buy now.

Fool contributor Steve Symington owns shares of SodaStream. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and SodaStream. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.