Will Fiat-Chrysler Be an American Automaker?

Signs of change in the global auto business: The brand emblems above the entrance to Fiat's Mirafiori facility in northern Italy now include Jeep's. More changes are coming as Fiat completes a merger with Detroit's Chrysler. Photo credit: Fiat Group.

Is Italian automaker Fiat  (NASDAQOTH: FIATY  ) becoming an American company?

It seems like a silly question. Fiat has been headquartered in the Italian city of Turin since 1899. But a merger between Fiat and Detroit automaker Chrysler is under way, and already there are signs that the merged company will be more American than Italian.

What does that mean? For investors, it might mean a dramatic change: The merged company is likely to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange. That could bring it more attention from global investors, who may start thinking of Fiat-with-Chrysler as a global company, rather than a regional one that has struggled in Europe.

What are the other implications? In this short video, Fool contributor John Rosevear looks at what it would mean for post-merger Fiat to move its headquarters to the United States -- and at why the combined company might be better off finessing the issue of whether it is "Italian" or "American."

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  • Report this Comment On January 12, 2014, at 9:04 PM, LouisTewl wrote:

    Glad to see you back, JR--

    Along with the NYSE listing is the anticipated $1B-$1.5B convertible bond offering by F-C to lower Fiat's debt. The NYSE listing will also give F-C greater access to the U.S. Institutional investors, all of which, in my opinion, is more critical than what or how U.S. retail investors (or certain Analysts who continue to exhibit and perpetrate a negative bias against F-C) think about F-C.

    The Italian unions will be pacified with re- employment. Fiat's pending increased production in 2014 at the Italian plants above the 2013 levels of 41%~ of capacity will go a lot farther to mollify the unions than whether or not the company headquarters is in Italy.

    Fiat reintroducing the Alfa-Romeo to the U.S. market, starting with the 4-C (I know, only 1200 copies currently expected this year) is all part of the program.

    You can see it when you go to the NAIAS, JR, or, look here (again) -

    http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2014-alfa-romeo-4c-coupe...

    Thanks.

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