Do You Have One of the 10 Best Jobs of 2014?

The best jobs in America have a few things in common. Click here to find out what they are.

Jan 26, 2014 at 3:33PM

Landing your dream job is often one of the defining moments of your life, but for millions of people, the job of their dreams lies somewhere out of reach. It doesn't have to be! With some careful planning, and a little luck, many people can get the job they've always wanted. It certainly helps to pursue a profession that's in high demand and that offers high pay, a good work-life balance, and a generally rewarding working experience.

This past week, U.S. News and World Report released its annual Best Jobs list, updated for 2014. The rankings may not be all that surprising for those already working one of the top 10 jobs on its list (you can see the full list of America's 100 best jobs here), but if you're struggling in your current profession, you might come away with a few options for your next big career shift. Let's start with the 10th-best job and work our way up the list now. 

Dentalhygienist

10. Dental hygienist
If you like teeth, you'll love being a dental hygienist -- these trained medical professionals not only clean patients' teeth, but they also serve as front-line warriors in the battle against bad breath, plaque, and the gum disease gingivitis (among other mouthy ailments). Many work in dentist's offices, and more than half work part-time, which makes this a great job for those who want to spend more time with their families.

  • Entry-level education: Associate's degree
  • Entry-level (bottom 10% of profession) pay: $46,540
  • Median pay: $70,210
  • Best pay (top 10% of profession): $96,280
  • Number of jobs in 2012: 192,800
  • Expected new jobs in 2022: 64,200 (33% job growth)
  • Upward mobility: Below average
  • Stress level: Average
  • Flexibility: High 
Webdeveloper

9. Web developer
The look and functionality of this website -- indeed, of virtually every website you see -- was built by skilled Web developers, who merge artistic and technical skills to create an online experience that's pleasing to the eye, easy to use, and efficient in its use of server resources. About 25% of all web developers are self-employed, so competition can be fierce, and having the right professional connections can make a huge difference.

  • Entry-level education: Associate's degree
  • Entry-level (bottom 10% of profession) pay: $33,550
  • Median pay: $62,500
  • Best pay (top 10% of profession): $105,200
  • Number of jobs in 2012: 141,400
  • Expected new jobs in 2022: 28,500 (20% job growth)
  • Upward mobility: Above average
  • Stress level: Below average
  • Flexibility: High 
Physician

8. Physician
When most people think of doctors, they probably think of physicians, who can range from the friendly family doctor (a general practitioner) to specialists in children's health (pediatricians), women's health (obstetricians and gynecologists), or skin care (dermatologists), to surgeons. These highly trained medical professionals might have a number of specialties, but they're all dedicated to the same goal: helping patients live healthier lives. The need for physicians will continue to surge as more Americans age into their golden years.

  • Entry-level education: Doctoral degree
  • Entry-level (bottom 10% of profession) pay: $66,790
  • Median pay: $187,200 (higher for most specialists)
  • Best pay (top 10% of profession): $432,900 (anesthesiologists)
  • Number of jobs in 2012: 691,400
  • Expected new jobs in 2022: 123,300 (18% job growth)
  • Upward mobility: Above average
  • Stress level: High
  • Flexibility: Average 
Physicaltherapist

7. Physical therapist
Physical therapists will also in remain high demand thanks to demographic changes, as they are primarily responsible for rehabilitating anyone with low mobility, whether that's a grandmother who's spent too much of her life on the couch watching TV or an elite athlete recovering from an on-the-field injury. Physical therapists can also work to alleviate the impact of chronic conditions like diabetes or obesity on patients' bodies. Many work in clinics, hospitals, or nursing homes, but some have their own private practices.

  • Entry-level education: Doctoral degree
  • Entry-level (bottom 10% of profession) pay: $55,620
  • Median pay: $79,860
  • Best pay (top 10% of profession): $112,020
  • Number of jobs in 2012: 204,200
  • Expected new jobs in 2022: 73,500 (36% job growth)
  • Upward mobility: Below average
  • Stress level: Below average
  • Flexibility: Above average 
Registerednurse

6. Registered nurse
It should come as no surprise that another highly visible medical profession has landed on the list of top jobs, as the demand for registered nurses has been well documented by both the media and by nursing schools that have eagerly recruited thousands of bright students to the field. Nurses assist physicians of all stripes with a wide range of patient care, from general practice and emergency rooms to specialist care for particular conditions or parts of the body.

  • Entry-level education: Associate's degree
  • Entry-level (bottom 10% of profession) pay: $45,040
  • Median pay: $65,470
  • Best pay (top 10% of profession): $94,720
  • Number of jobs in 2012: 2,711,500
  • Expected new jobs in 2022: 526,800 (19% job growth)
  • Upward mobility: Average
  • Stress level: Above average
  • Flexibility: Average

Do you have one of the 10 best jobs in America for 2014? Are you still looking for an even better opportunity? There are five more jobs on our list, so click here to read about the top five jobs of 2014.

Get started today on your investing journey
As you continue to invest time and money into your professional development, keep in mind that investing in your financial future is also important for long-term success and comfort. You don't need much at all to begin, but it's important to begin today. That's why we're offering our readers a brand-new and completely free special report: "Your Essential Guide to Start Investing Today." In it, The Motley Fool's personal-finance experts will show you why investing is so important and highlight the steps you need to take to get started, no matter where you're starting from. Click here to get your copy of this important report today -- it's absolutely free.

All images were obtained from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Add Fool contributor Alex Planes on Google+, or follow him on Twitter, @TMFBiggles, for more insight into markets, history, and technology.

Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Money to your ears - A great FREE investing resource for you

The best way to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts ... what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Feb 1, 2016 at 5:03PM

Whether we're in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market's lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you'll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and "analysis" from people who might have your email address ... but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, "11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich," rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts ... what we like to think of as "binge-worthy finance."

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it's true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week's top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life's biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he's the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today's most innovative and disruptive companies ... and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They're all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it's worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today's events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you're looking for a friendly voice ... with great advice on how to make the most of your money ... from a business with a lengthy track record of success ... in clear, compelling language ... I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It's money to your ears.

 


Compare Brokers