Google, Inc. Goes From Nexus One to Nexus Done

Rumor has it that Google is about to end its Nexus series of Android devices. Here's why this totally unconfirmed report makes lots of sense.

Jan 27, 2014 at 1:30PM

Nexus

The Nexus One, resplendent in its 2010-era makeup. Source: Google.

Google (NASDAQ:GOOGL) has been selling smartphones and tablets under the Nexus brand since 2010. The only Android devices officially offered by Google itself, the line has included hardware designs by HTC, Samsung, LG, and Asus. The devices have served as developer platforms with the least embellished version of the Android operating system, but also found traction with consumers in recent years.

And now, rumor has it that 2014 could be the last hurrah for Google's Nexus brand. Well-respected mobile industry watcher Eldar Murtazin said so in one tantalizing tweet, naming no sources but making a metric ton of sense:

I can think of at least four reasons why Murtazin should be spot-on with this wildly unofficial announcement:

  1. Google has never given a Nexus assignment to Motorola Mobility, which now is a division of Google itself. It's high time to take ownership of Android hardware, in a way that the Nexus program never really allowed.

  2. Murtazin says that Nexus will be replaced by another Google-blessed brand. I'm assuming this will be an exclusive Motorola affair, and that the new brand will be aimed directly at consumers rather than developers and other industry insiders. The Nexus devices may have been capable, but they were never particularly sexy. Expect this to change with new, bold design choices -- far from the plainspoken simplicity of the Nexus series.

  3. This could be the perfect time to separate Google from the aging Nexus name. Smartphone growth is stagnating, since Android and Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) iPhone devices have replaced the dumber "feature phones" as the most popular type of mobile phone. So why not reboot the mobile market with unheard-of features, the aforementioned new designs, and a totally fresh brand name? Don't expect Apple to go this route, given the huge brand value the company has built in the iPhone name, but the more diverse Android side of the mobile market seems more amenable to a branding reboot.

  4. Nexus

    The Nexus 5, probably one of the last Nexus-branded gadgets. Source: Google.

    Google likes to play games. The Nexus phones and tablets were arguably named after the Nexus 6 in Philip K. Dick's classic short story, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, which many readers will recognize as the basis for the hit movie Blade Runner. If so, this year's Nexus 6 smartphone would be an appropriate end to the series, notwithstanding the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 tablets. The Nexus tablets took a different course from the start, being named for their size rather than a serial progression, so they don't really count against the Electric Sheep parameters.

In a nutshell, the Nexus brand has played its part and it's time for Google to take on Apple head-to-head with an in-house brand of consumer-oriented smartphones. This happens just as smartphones transition from high end and upscale to bog-standard commodity gear, and I for one can't wait to see what Google -- and Apple! -- have up their sleeves for the next mobile generation.

The secret back road into mobile riches
Want to get in on the smartphone phenomenon? Truth be told, one company sits at the crossroads of smartphone technology as we know it. It's not your typical household name, either. This company attacks the mobile market from an angle we all take for granted. In fact, you've probably never even heard of it! But it stands to reap massive profits NO MATTER WHO ultimately wins the smartphone war. To find out what it is, click here to access the "One Stock You Must Buy Before the iPhone-Android War Escalates Any Further..."

Fool contributor Anders Bylund owns shares of Google. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Apple and Google. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Money to your ears - A great FREE investing resource for you

The best way to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts ... what we like to think of as “binge-worthy finance.”

Feb 1, 2016 at 5:03PM

Whether we're in the midst of earnings season or riding out the market's lulls, you want to know the best strategies for your money.

And you'll want to go beyond the hype of screaming TV personalities, fear-mongering ads, and "analysis" from people who might have your email address ... but no track record of success.

In short, you want a voice of reason you can count on.

A 2015 Business Insider article titled, "11 websites to bookmark if you want to get rich," rated The Motley Fool as the #1 place online to get smarter about investing.

And one of the easiest, most enjoyable, most valuable ways to get your regular dose of market and money insights is our suite of free podcasts ... what we like to think of as "binge-worthy finance."

Whether you make it part of your daily commute or you save up and listen to a handful of episodes for your 50-mile bike rides or long soaks in a bubble bath (or both!), the podcasts make sense of your money.

And unlike so many who want to make the subjects of personal finance and investing complicated and scary, our podcasts are clear, insightful, and (yes, it's true) fun.

Our free suite of podcasts

Motley Fool Money features a team of our analysts discussing the week's top business and investing stories, interviews, and an inside look at the stocks on our radar. The show is also heard weekly on dozens of radio stations across the country.

The hosts of Motley Fool Answers challenge the conventional wisdom on life's biggest financial issues to reveal what you really need to know to make smart money moves.

David Gardner, co-founder of The Motley Fool, is among the most respected and trusted sources on investing. And he's the host of Rule Breaker Investing, in which he shares his insights into today's most innovative and disruptive companies ... and how to profit from them.

Market Foolery is our daily look at stocks in the news, as well as the top business and investing stories.

And Industry Focus offers a deeper dive into a specific industry and the stories making headlines. Healthcare, technology, energy, consumer goods, and other industries take turns in the spotlight.

They're all informative, entertaining, and eminently listenable. Rule Breaker Investing and Answers are timeless, so it's worth going back to and listening from the very start; the other three are focused more on today's events, so listen to the most recent first.

All are available for free at www.fool.com/podcasts.

If you're looking for a friendly voice ... with great advice on how to make the most of your money ... from a business with a lengthy track record of success ... in clear, compelling language ... I encourage you to give a listen to our free podcasts.

Head to www.fool.com/podcasts, give them a spin, and you can subscribe there (at iTunes, Stitcher, or our other partners) if you want to receive them regularly.

It's money to your ears.

 


Compare Brokers