The 2015 Alfa Romeo 4C sports car is the first of several Alfas headed for U.S. shores. The 4C will arrive at a few select U.S. Fiat dealers by the end of June. Photo credit: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

It's one of the biggest trends in the auto business: Around the world, luxury-vehicle sales are booming.

Nearly every global automaker is investing big in luxury models, andĀ Fiat Chrysler AutomobilesĀ (NASDAQOTH:FIATY) is no exception. The Italian-American automaker owns several intriguing luxury brands, including Ferrari, Maserati -- and Alfa Romeo.

FCA's challenge is to turn that little grab bag of brands into a cohesive model lineup that can challenge the German luxury behemoths. At the lower end of the market, that job will fall to Alfa Romeo. Alfa will make its long-awaited return to the U.S. market this spring, with a hot sports car called the 4C -- a model that will be followed by a slew of new Alfas over the next few years.

If FCA's emerging plan works out -- and if the new vehicles are strong contenders -- this plan could lead to a significant boost in FCA's profits over time. In this video, Fool contributor John Rosevear looks at what is known about FCA's plan for luxury-car domination and what U.S. Italian-car fans can expect to see over the next few years.

Free report: These 3 stocks can help you retire rich!
It's no secret that investors tend to be impatient with the market, but the best investment strategy is to buy shares in solid businesses and keep them for the long term. In the special free report "3 Stocks That Will Help You Retire Rich," The Motley Fool shares investment ideas and strategies that could help you build wealth for years to come. Click here to grab your free copy today.

John Rosevear has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends BMW. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.