Dow Tonight: Pfizer Issues Recall as AT&T Touts Its Network Spending

The Dow gained ground again today in advance of a key jobs report Friday. Find out some the Dow stocks that made news Thursday.

Mar 6, 2014 at 9:00PM

On Thursday, the Dow Jones Industrials (DJINDICES:^DJI) closed the day up almost 62 points, closing to within 1% of the record level it set on the last day of 2013. Throughout the market, investors have looked closely at recent U.S. economic data to assess the economy's ability to keep expanding, and even though today's figures on jobless claims and other related data gave some hints on how the job market is performing, Friday's Labor Department report for February will have the potential to move the Dow if it surprises in either direction. Meanwhile, today, Pfizer (NYSE:PFE) was among the rare decliners in the Dow, while AT&T (NYSE:T) managed to gain ground as it tries to convince customers that it is working hard to boost its quality to fight rival Verizon (NYSE:VZ).

For Pfizer, today's loss of almost 1% made the pharma stock the worst performer in the Dow Thursday. Given the impressive gains that the stock has seen so far in 2014 despite the Dow's lackluster performance, Pfizer's decline today was likely nothing more than simple trader-induced profit-taking. But the company got bad news after the bell, as it revealed that it would recall some of its Effexor antidepressant capsules as well as those of subsidiary Greenstone's Venlafaxine. Pfizer said that a pharmacist had reported that one bottle of Effexor also contained a capsule of anti-arhythmia drug Tikosyn, and with the company warning that the two drugs can be fatal for certain patients if taken together, Pfizer decided that the precaution was warranted. The stock actually gained ground after hours, as the recall only affects two lots of Effexor, and one lot of Venlafaxine.

Meanwhile, AT&T climbed two-thirds of a percent on a busy day for the telecom giant. The company issued a long series of press releases touting the billions of dollars it has spent on enhancing wireless networks across the country. Of particular note was the company's $1.6 billion investment in the Seattle/Tacoma area, which includes some of the most influential technology companies in the nation. Along with other tech-heavy areas like Silicon Valley, Seattle is an important focal point for wireless networks in trying to establish their reputations. With Verizon having long boasted of its greater coverage area and arguing that its network quality is also higher, AT&T's investments will need to prove themselves out in better coverage in order to convince potential customers that it offers a superior product. As AT&T and Verizon fight each other and their smaller rivals in what's becoming an increasingly tough price war, the entire industry will have to find ways to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

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4 in 5 Americans Are Ignoring Buffett's Warning

Don't be one of them.

Jun 12, 2015 at 5:01PM

Admitting fear is difficult.

So you can imagine how shocked I was to find out Warren Buffett recently told a select number of investors about the cutting-edge technology that's keeping him awake at night.

This past May, The Motley Fool sent 8 of its best stock analysts to Omaha, Nebraska to attend the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting. CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger fielded questions for nearly 6 hours.
The catch was: Attendees weren't allowed to record any of it. No audio. No video. 

Our team of analysts wrote down every single word Buffett and Munger uttered. Over 16,000 words. But only two words stood out to me as I read the detailed transcript of the event: "Real threat."

That's how Buffett responded when asked about this emerging market that is already expected to be worth more than $2 trillion in the U.S. alone. Google has already put some of its best engineers behind the technology powering this trend. 

The amazing thing is, while Buffett may be nervous, the rest of us can invest in this new industry BEFORE the old money realizes what hit them.

KPMG advises we're "on the cusp of revolutionary change" coming much "sooner than you think."

Even one legendary MIT professor had to recant his position that the technology was "beyond the capability of computer science." (He recently confessed to The Wall Street Journal that he's now a believer and amazed "how quickly this technology caught on.")

Yet according to one J.D. Power and Associates survey, only 1 in 5 Americans are even interested in this technology, much less ready to invest in it. Needless to say, you haven't missed your window of opportunity. 

Think about how many amazing technologies you've watched soar to new heights while you kick yourself thinking, "I knew about that technology before everyone was talking about it, but I just sat on my hands." 

Don't let that happen again. This time, it should be your family telling you, "I can't believe you knew about and invested in that technology so early on."

That's why I hope you take just a few minutes to access the exclusive research our team of analysts has put together on this industry and the one stock positioned to capitalize on this major shift.

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David Hanson owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway and American Express. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Google, and Coca-Cola.We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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