What Is General Electric?

What is General Electric?

Source: Flickr/Jeffrey Turner

It seems like a simple question. And for most companies, it is.

If you asked me about Wal-MartGeneral Motors, or Bank of America, I'd tell you they're in the business of retail, automotive manufacturing, and banking, respectively. I'm sure anyone would. These are household names, after all.

For the industrial giant General Electric, it's a little more complex. GE actually runs eight different businesses. Each and every one of them would be Fortune 500 companies on a stand-alone basis.

GE owns the sixth most valuable brand in the world, yet it makes scarcely any consumer-facing products outside of your everyday kitchen appliances.

So what is it that generated $146 billion in revenue for GE in 2013? Click on the slideshow below for a deep dive into this 122-year-old conglomerate.

GE's still on the bleeding edge
In the early 1900s GE pushed electricity to the forefront of industry and into the homes of thousands of Americans. Today, its driving force behind another powerful and pervasive technology: the industrial Internet. But GE's not the only company exploring this concept, and it might not be the one that benefits the most.

In fact, The Motley Fool's chief investment officer has identified a company poised to profit that he calls "the hidden winner behind the 'Internet of Everything'." It beat out hundreds of companies as our No. 1 stock for 2014, and it's identified in this special free report: "The Motley Fool's Top Stock for 2014." Just click here to access the report and find out the name of this under-the-radar company.

What Is General Electric? from The Motley Fool


Read/Post Comments (4) | Recommend This Article (15)

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Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2014, at 3:55 PM, SunDevilDon wrote:

    You might want to take another look at your definition for number 7, "Transportation".

    "Includes home and business products including refrigerators, dishwashers and light bulbs". This the same as the one on number 3 "Home and Business Solutions". :-)

  • Report this Comment On March 12, 2014, at 4:29 PM, TMFBoomer wrote:

    @SunDevilDon

    You are right. That would be a slightly different transportation business indeed. Good catch and I just fixed.

    Thanks for the heads-up.

    Isaac

    @TMFBoomer

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 2:02 PM, mdotley wrote:

    "Each and every one of them would be Fortune 500 companies on a stand-alone basis."

    ... should be ...

    "Each and every one of them would be a Fortune 500 company on a stand-alone basis."

    That is, assuming the statement is correct. :-)

  • Report this Comment On March 23, 2014, at 3:41 PM, TMFBoomer wrote:

    @mdotley

    You are right. Thanks for the suggestion and I'll get that fixed pronto.

    And by my calculations it's correct. On a revenue basis:

    GE's smallest segment = $6B

    Fortune 500's smallest company = $4.8B

    http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune500/2013/full_...

    Isaac

    @TMFBoomer

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