Your State Could Legalize Marijuana Sooner Than You Think


Source: Wikipedia / Bogdan.

There has been no end to the wild speculation over the amount of money legalized marijuana sales would bring in. And with no data to report, speculation is pretty much all anyone could do. But now with Colorado's recent announcement that it took in $2 million in tax revenues on $14 million in sales, the great debate over the economic merits of legalization is about to heat up to another level. With numerous U.S. states still saddled with crippling budget deficits, this could be a huge opportunity for them to generate some extra cash to turn things around.

The uniqueness of Colorado
Marijuana has been legalized in other parts of the U.S. and the rest of the world for some time now, but Colorado is the world's first fully regulated recreational marijuana market. Because of this, it is being watched very intently by other states (and countries) to see the effects of marijuana sales on tax revenue and other aspects of the state economy.

Why other states should care
The obvious answer here is revenue, as there are plenty of states that are currently having budget issues with essential expenses they need to figure out how to pay. In Colorado's case, the state has already earmarked the first $40 million in excise tax revenue from marijuana sales for school construction, and the recent revenue numbers have prompted new debates within the state government regarding how additional tax revenues should be spent.

States on the cusp
There are legalization bills and ballot measures currently being discussed in 19 states (plus the District of Columbia) that would permit recreational use of marijuana. The states closest to passing bills are Alaska and Oregon, both of which are expected to have a measure on the ballot once 2014's election comes, and these two will more than likely pass.

However, some of the other states on this list are still facing significant opposition, but some concrete numbers to go along with the supporters' arguments in favor of legalization could be just what is needed to move them along.

For example, Pennsylvania's Senate Bill 528, which would legalize and regulate recreational use of marijuana, is currently in committee, and I'd be willing to bet that Colorado's revenue has come up in recent discussions. The state is currently facing a budget deficit of more than $1 billion due to other tax changes, and could really use any help it can get to bridge the gap.

New York currently has a bill pending that would allow adults to possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana and has already approved a medical marijuana bill. The state has estimated that once it finalized the taxation and regulation of the market, medical marijuana alone would generate about $200 million annually in tax revenues. If recreational use were legalized, this figure could be much higher.

Having a new revenue stream that can be used for whatever a state happens to need is a pretty good result of legalizing something that has been around for decades.

National legalization, and what it could mean for the states
As fellow Fool contributor John Maxfield pointed out, the biggest obstacle to the marijuana industry in general is that it is still illegal at the federal level, despite what each state does. This creates several challenges for the industry, including the fact that it's still illegal to transport marijuana across state lines, regardless of whether or not it was obtained legally. It also prohibits banks from providing services to the industry, which has pretty much turned the marijuana business into an all-cash operation.

A recent CNN survey shows that 55% of U.S. adults believe that marijuana should be legal, and the nationwide trend has been toward legalization for some time now. Additionally, the federal government could definitely use the money, as well. If marijuana were to become legal on the national level, it would eliminate a lot of barriers of entry to the industry, creating wider availability of product, and even more revenue for the states.

How to profit from legalization
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  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 1:49 PM, Yahbrah wrote:

    This article fails to mention anything on the legalization in Washington State....

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 1:51 PM, quacker wrote:

    more people die from bee stings than from ODing on pot, ever

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 1:59 PM, JBuser wrote:

    God of Israel “Be holy, because I am holy.” 1 Peter 1:16

    Several States in the American Union have legalized the recreational use of marijuana even with studies that state that this drug leads to the use of even more dangerous addictions. How safe is your life, liberty and property if your neighbors are intoxicated, doped up, and mentally impaired, and being so addicted, they are dependent upon the State’s permission to feed their habit. Certainly, their vote, a delegation of sovereign authority, will be used to raise up and maintain wicked magistrates who will be more than happy to support a voters dangerous addictions while conspiring to rob every citizen of everything valuable. Vattel in ‘The Law of Nations’ writes, ” But if they (public magistrates) corrupt the morals of the people, spread a taste for luxury, effeminacy, a rage for licentious pleasures…beware, citizens! beware of those corruptors! they only aim at purchasing slaves in order to exercise over them an arbitrary sway.” The foundation of democracy is virtue. The virtue of the people is the internal law that results in good behavior which is the requirement of self-government in a federal republic. However, if the people become corrupted, we as nation go from self-government to “survival of the fittest,” from a democracy to a mobocracy, and from the mob a strong man must rise who is called a dictator

    Vattel “It is an incontestable truth, that the virtues of the citizens constitute the most happy dispositions that can be desired by a just and wise government.

    Example: Marijuana and other drugs destroys the jury system – a loss of protection of life, liberty, and property.

    David Hardy 'Juror Testimony' transcript “he felt like...the jury was on one big party...seven jurors drank alcohol....Hardy stated that on several occasions he observed two jurors having one or two mixed drinks during the lunch recess, and one other juror, who was also the foreperson, having a liter of wine...three other jurors smoked marijuana quite regularly during the trial. Moreover, Hardy stated that during the trail he observed one juror ingest cocaine five times and another juror ingest cocaine two or three times. One juror sold a quarter pound of marijuana to another juror during the trial, and took marijuana, cocaine, and drug paraphernalia into the courthouse. Hardy noted that some of the jurors were falling asleep during trial, and that one of the jurors described himself to Hardy as 'flying'. (History of the Common Law, page 526)

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 2:03 PM, liffie wrote:

    They didn't mention Washington State because the article was covering the tax revenue generated by the sale of "legal" marijuana, and from what I have seen there has been no report from Washington State as to the amount of tax revenue generated. Also I don't think they have started recreational sales yet in Washington but I could be mistaken.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 2:07 PM, BentEars wrote:

    I KNEW that all the other states and jurisdictions would be watching Colorado very closely indeed. And the moment the state didn't implode in some sort of immoral Black Hole, and the state started declaring how much money they were taking in, other states would be leaping into the fray. It's about damn time too! Who would have thought that so many people's lives would have been ruined by having a little dried lettuce in their pocket?

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 2:28 PM, joe2345 wrote:

    How safe is your life, liberty and property if the billions from marijuana sales is going to Mexican drug cartels and murderous gangs instead of hard working law abiding Americans?

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:05 PM, RainbowHawk wrote:

    With all of the hype on how much money will, or could, be garnered via tax revenues a major factor seems to being totally ignored.

    With legalization huge amounts of funds will be cut in the policing and imprisoning of pot users. Courts would reduce their dockets greatly and be able to concentrate on real crimes. Likewise vast police assets currently used (or is that misused?) to police the use of a natural herb can be shifted or even eliminated, thus used to do real police work on genuine crimes, both of violence and white collar ones which are destroying the economy and many lives.

    The saving on law enforcement may well be much greater than the earnings from taxation. Which of course makes it a win-win situation.

    Additionally one must consider the great cost factors when a bread winning parent is imprisoned and their immediate family becomes dependent upon the welfare system. So it not only cost the tax payers around $50,000. a year to imprison an individual (times about a half a million pot related prisoners incarcerated) but also the additional cost of assuring the families very survival and such cost is generally born by the State, e.g. your tax dollars.

    The real economic factors far surpass the very limited views expressed with a focus purely upon the tax revenues which can (and is being) raised is indeed a very limited view of things and the overall picture(s) are of a much greater scope. Tens of billions of dollars now spent on law enforcement methods, which have failed miserably, would be freed up for much more important issues than what individuals chose to use as their means of elevating their consciousness, to simply enjoy life as they will and essentially to live the realities of the Constitutionally guaranteed "inalienable rights" to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

    The pot issues are of course based upon individuals desires and not everybody may agree, but when the highest law of the land, e.g the Constitution of the United States of America, guarantees certain liberties those liberties must be upheld regardless of individuals or groups moral judgements which attempt to subvert the Rights of the People. It's the simple thing which we all call "Freedom" and freedom of choice of what one wishes to do with their own bodies is thee most basic of freedoms.

    Tens-Hundreds of Billions of Dollars have been thrown down the drain on a "War or Drugs?" started by no less than Richard M. Nixon who left the White House in disgrace, yet the war went on (thee longest "War" in U.S. history no less) and has cost the people on a myriad of levels as cited, but perhaps even more importantly that phony war has been used to usurp the Rights of the People in the name of law enforcement and security.

    The Constitution has been turned upon its' head and the government of today is very far from the ideals of freedom and democracy which the nation is founded upon.

    In fact, legally speaking, when government officials whom are all sworn to uphold and defend the Constitution against all foreign "and domestic" enemies are themselves violating the very document which they are sworn to uphold they are each guilty of the crimes of high treason.

    Pot is really just a side issue which has been greatly misused by government to subject the people to un-Constitutional actions by the government itself,

    But as Ben Franklin once said: If you are willing to give up a little of your rights for a little security you will have, nor deserve, neither.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:06 PM, mnymaker28 wrote:

    FACT=In the last 10 years there has been NO overdoses on the use of maryjuana but every 18 seconds there is an overdose on over the counter drugs!!!!

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:25 PM, yashu wrote:

    legalization WILL happen. It's only taking too long because politicians are fearful of losing their jobs if they come out in favor of it. it's time to make politicians aware that they will LOSE their jobs unless they vote to legalize nationally.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:37 PM, singnbob wrote:

    This has been coming all my life and am glad to see sanity returning to the country slowly but surely.. locking people up for doing something that in many ways enhances our relationships, our creativity, and ability to deal with this white bread culture is stupid.. and most of the folks behind bars are black or lower economic class..if you are rich you don't get jail time for much of anything like this! JBUSER you sir have no idea what is reality! Good luck with maintaining that belief structure.. States will opt for the revenue and Feds will too sooner than we think.. Canada is about to make medical marijuana available, then legalization will follow ,Mexico will end the drug wars in their country soon with legalization as the latin americans countries will one by one by one and then Australia, South Africa onward .. it's a matter of time .. Haven't smoked in 30 years but know if it a far better choice than any other stimulant particularly alcohol.. life is meant to be enjoyed.. let's accept this Hemp product back into the family and enjoy all it's many benefits.. oh yea Hemp that's a whole nother ballgame for states to enjoy revenue from!!

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:52 PM, MurphySteven wrote:

    They will need a large sum of money to care for people who get hurt - medical care and property damage.

    Its Sophistry and Megalomania - where public, and politicians would create junkies and pushers looking to legalize the drug, therefore duped by the myth that marijuana can do no harm.. They make it seem harmless - its a disaster waiting to happen. National Drug Control Policy showed a report, that 3,952 or more drivers were fatally injured in car crashes, they tested positive for drugs.

    Four children and the driver died when a Tippy Toes Learning Academy van veered off a bustling freeway and hit a concrete bridge abutment. Investigators say the driver, Wesley Hudson, regularly smoked marijuana, and that the kids nicknamed him "Smokey." He was found with 1.9 grams of pot in his pocket at the crash scene.

    Marijuana users presume it's much safer than driving drunk - yet suddenly fall asleep after long time being awake, because marijuana and cocaine are stimulants.

    With this Sophistry and Megalomania their mind is not on the real subject, for example a tobacco smoker would be believed to be a harm to them and others, yet not believe that smoking marijuana is air pollution too - its smells like burning cow manure.

    With Sophistry and Megalomania someone could burn car tire and call it medicinal. Just like with marijuana it magically medicinal.

    Marijuana is oil soluble therefore collects in the fatty parts of the body therefore can be there and be detected up to 11 weeks later.

    They can collect this as marijuana into a tube and run butane or solvent into it, to collect it as a waxy substance, like they do with cocaine they use a solvent to collect cocaine which smells like chocolate - "smells like chocolate. Seriously it does" it was explained, yet could smell like solvents or camphor. The problem is that making it - can blow up your house, from sparks or open flame.

    A former nurse's aide was convicted of murder and sentenced to 50 years in prison for hitting a homeless man with her car and driving home with his mangled body in the windshield. The incident happened after a night of drinking, smoking pot, and taking Ecstasy. After arriving home, the woman parked her car, with the man still lodged in her windshield, and left him there until his death.

    There are many accidents caused by marijuana. Therefore how often do they tell what really happened, it can be proved. The driver of a charter bus on May 9, 1999, crashed and killed 22 people, was fired from bus companies in 1989 and 1996, after testing positive for marijuana, four times.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 3:57 PM, seanfromvt wrote:

    Lets all battle together to eradicate an evil plant......Poison Ivy

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:02 PM, 56GrayMule wrote:

    Legalizing Marijuana nationally has to happen for Obama Care to work - Federal health care can not nor will not allow people to consume several high dollar medications each day when Marijuana cures anxiety, sleeplessness, minor aces and pains and any and all thoughts of discontent toward a wicked government. The best part for uncle sam, it wont be covered under Obamacare because its recreational, so you pay twice.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:03 PM, gpellison wrote:

    Sure, let's throw morality down the drain so that we can make money! Why don't we legalize prostitution while we are at it.

    I have no problem with Medical Marijuana use, but I am against the wide spread legalization of it because states are not looking at the science or the affect on morality, but only as a new cash cow! Most people that use this drug for recreation are lower income. Do we really need to give these people another "sin" to spend their money on legally, all the while we subsidize their groceries, rent, and lack of drive, education, and income earning potential?

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:03 PM, ShortFuse wrote:

    That's a male plant. Look at the top right corner. Kill it now and smoke it.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:06 PM, JohnThomas wrote:

    Thanks to Murphy Steven and a few others for showing us Reefer Madness is still alive and well - but it only strikes some small-minded non-consumers.

    Some people think marijuana consumption causes accidents like alcohol does. It doesn't, for various reasons. Research has shown marijuana is less intoxicating. More importantly, while alcohol drinkers think they are better drivers and so drive faster and more aggressively, marijuana consumers are very aware of their altered consciousness and correctly judge when they are too impaired to drive - refraining from doing so. If they must, they correctly compensate for their altered state by driving slower and more cautiously.

    The point is, judgment is not affected like it is with alcohol. Marijuana consumers simply don't put themselves or others in harm's way. Consequently, the preponderance of the research shows marijuana is NOT a significant cause of auto accidents

    The Hartford Courant confirms this:

    >>>"States that legalized the medical use of marijuana have had a drop in deadly automobile crashes, suggesting that some people who would otherwise drive drunk and kill someone are smoking weed instead, according to research by three economists."

    Because a few sloppy amateurs are causing explosions making concentrates, that is no argument for the fraudulent prohibition. Moonshiners frequently had their stills blow up, but nobody thinks that's a reason for prohibiting alcohol - again.

    It's clear there are NO significant harms of marijuana. All the crime, violence and corruption that now swirl around the plant are caused by the monstrously destructive, counter-productive, freedom-strangling FRAUD of marijuana prohibition.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:09 PM, JohnThomas wrote:

    Thank goodness, Americans are finally ready to end this monstrous witch-hunt! - Haters like gpellison have been empowered for far too long. They have delighted in helping to demonize millions of Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over addictive, very harmful alcohol.

    SAMHSA research determined more than 100 million Americans have consumed marijuana. That's near HALF the of-age population. There are an estimated 30 to 50 million current consumers. The vast majority consume moderately - on the weekends or less, and are successful, hard-working, respected members of their communities. They are from all walks of life and loved by the families they support.

    Since we now know marijuana is less "addictive" than coffee, and far less harmful than alcohol, this should be no surprise to anyone.

    Marijuana is as American as apple pie - and healthier.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:12 PM, JohnThomas wrote:

    It's great we are finally ending the monstrous war on marijuana consumers, but this article is sad because we are largely doing it for the wrong reason - to generate some extra tax money.

    More than 700,000 innocent Americans are arrested for simple marijuana possession each year and made second-class citizens - for life! They will forever face huge obstacles to decent employment, education, travel, housing, government benefits, and will always go into court with one strike against them. They can even have their children taken away!

    20 million Americans are now locked away in this very un-American sub-class. That has a horrible effect on the whole country, being an incredible waste of human potential.

    The fraudulent prohibition has never accomplished one positive thing. It has only caused vast amounts of crime, corruption, violence, death and the severe diminishment of everyone's freedom.

    There is no more important domestic issue than ending what is essentially the American Inquisition.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 4:25 PM, Kerschnuffle wrote:

    JBuser and some of you others- I'm a believer myself, but I have to ask- is it 'holy' to continue to support the bigotry of those like Harry Aslinger, which led to the criminalization of marijuana? Is it 'holy' to support the corporate control of our healthcare, while denying the remedies created for us in nature? The outdated studies claiming marijuana as a 'gateway' drug have been so thoroughly disproven as to be laughable today.

    Have you considered letting go of that 'old-time religion' and those outdated ideas and trying the actual freedom that Christ died to provide for you?

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 5:07 PM, herbwarrior420 wrote:

    Legalization Would Make It Harder For Teens To Get Cannabis

    December 30, 2013

    By Neil Franklin, Executive Director, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition

    I was a cop in Maryland for 34 years. I’m the last person who wants to see teenagers using marijuana or any other drug. But whatleap I learned in my 34 years is that if you don’t want teens to have access to something, prohibiting that thing is the worst thing you can do (“Harms of marijuana use,” Dec. 17). Prohibition just puts it in the hands of unregulated, unlicensed dealers who sell product of unknown quality to anyone, which is why teens consistently tell us it’s easier to buy marijuana than to buy alcohol.

    If you want to address the problem of underage use, and to ensure marijuana is safer for everyone, put it in the hands of licensed sellers accountable to the government. Not only will this cut back on teen use, it ensures that the profits created go back into our communities — where they can be used for education, treatment and prevention problems — rather than into the pockets of the violent gangs who control the trade on the streets.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 5:18 PM, herbwarrior420 wrote:

    Why This DEA Agent Left His Job To Help Sell Marijuana

    December 14, 2013

    By Matt Sledge, HuffingtonPost.com

    He’s been a cop, a sheriff’s deputy and a DEA agent. And now Patrick Moen is taking on his latest assignment: helping sell marijuana. But he isn’t going undercovercannanuglets — he’s going to work for a legal business that supports the marijuana industry.

    Moen recently left his job with the DEA in Portland, where he tracked cocaine and methamphetamine traffickers, to work for a small private equity firm in Seattle called Privateer Holdings.

    As the company’s managing director of compliance and senior counsel, Moen will guide Privateer Holdings through the tricky legal waters of investing in marijuana-related businesses in one of the two states that has legalized the drug — while keeping federal prosecutors happy. Moen’s company will not directly support marijuana growers and distributors yet, but it does aim to invest in ventures like marijuana strain review websites and “business parks” for growers.

    HuffPost talked to Moen about his 10-year stint with the DEA, what his old coworkers think of his new career track and what he sees in store for the burgeoning industry.

    What do your former colleagues at the DEA think?

    My overall experience with former colleagues has been overwhelming positive. I was actually kind of surprised at that response, but they were really very supportive.

    It’s basically an extension of how my family and friends reacted. It was important to me when I was making this transition to get feedback from family and friends, and I wanted to make sure they viewed this favorably, and I wasn’t sure how they would take it.

    The DEA, of course, is charged with enforcing marijuana laws. Do you see your new line of work as a break with what you were doing at the agency?

    I look at it as more of an evolution. When I was with DEA, I was primarily focused on large scale trafficking of so-called hard drugs … and I didn’t work a lot of marijuana cases. It never was a priority for me personally, and I think that attitude is shared by my former colleagues, so it never was a priority.

    When this opportunity came up, I didn’t see it as a contradiction, I saw it as an evolution — in the sense that we all know prohibition is going to end, and I think personally that it’s critically important in order for this process to succeed, we need to establish professional businesses that can bring mainstream brands to mainstream America, and without that this experiment in democracy is going to fail.

    So marijuana wasn’t a priority for front-line agents? Is focusing on marijuana a bad way to get ahead within the agency?

    I guess you could say there’s kind of a hierarchy within the DEA of which cases are sexy and exciting and those that aren’t, and really that reflects I think the priorities that the agents feel in terms of which of these drugs are most harmful to society … cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

    Advancing, it’s all merit based. You make good cases, you do good work and opportunities open up. I don’t think there’s any kind of a bias one way or another, it’s, ‘Are you a capable investigator?’

    Why did you want to work with the marijuana industry?

    Prohibition causes the black market, the black market creates opportunities for illicit money, and ideally we want that black market to go away. In order to do that, we need to establish professional companies. If the industry side of this can’t succeed, the black market won’t go away. And there are plenty of obstacles in the industry, there’s a lot of fragmentation, there are inexperienced and ineffective managers … in addition, the legal landscape is complicated, and we’re trying to navigate it.

    We’re focused on Washington right now. Washington state has promulgated a set of regulations for the initial licensing process. There’s going to be growing pains. On paper they look pretty good. We’re probably going to encounter some difficulties as we move through the process.

    At the DEA you must have done work looking at the financing for illegal drug enterprises. Do you see any parallels in the difficult work of obtaining access to banking services for legal marijuana operations?

    If we don’t give the industry access to banking like any other industry would have, we’re creating the potential for problems. If you’re forcing the business into a cash-only business, you’re only creating the possibility for theft, robbery, et cetera.

    Do you think legalizing marijuana is the first step toward legalizing other so-called ‘hard’ drugs?

    That’s a really tough question. It’s taken so long to get this far on marijuana legalization, and I think the tide of opinion is changing rapidly in favor of legalization. I really don’t know what that’s going to mean for other drugs down the road. They’re not really, in my opinion, in the same category. If you’re talking about harm to society, you can’t even compare.

    Personally, we’re trying to focus right now on bringing mainstream cannabis brands to the mainstream audience. That’s what people want right now. I don’t think the public tolerance level for further discussion is in the cards right now.

    Will Privateer Holdings lobby to legalize marijuana in states beyond Colorado and Washington?

    It’s not something we here are going to get really involved in. We have been asked our opinion by legislators and policy wonks, and we certainly have an opinion, but we’re really focused on building our company and the industry. I think they go hand in hand to some degree — one can’t exist without the other, policy and industry.

    The tide has turned with the policy, and we need to establish professional businesses to ensure that all these efforts don’t go to waste. If the businesses cannot professionalize and be transparent and be compliant, then they’re going to shut the operation down and this is all going to go away.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 5:28 PM, bobb1011 wrote:

    As all the other states go legal there will be a hand-full of stocks that will soar. the "brick n mortar"stocks will do the best TRTC, PHOT, ERBB, MCIG & HEMP Will all do very good. bought as a basket these will turn out to be a wise investment. there penny stocks for now. I dont recommend penny stocks, but this is a special situation with this new milti billion $ buisness

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 5:30 PM, timeforsense wrote:

    This is a very inspiring sequence of events in otherwise very dark times if you ask me. I want to express, as one who has forever argued for the legalization of recreational and medical marijuana, that there are many great reasons for legalization. Strangely, it seems to be the economical, or money, reasons that speak to people who otherwise don't seem to care about it. It is my opinion that while this IS a good thing, especially in these poor economic times, it shouldn't distract from the fact that marijuana is one of the safest drugs that can be used recreationally. I have used many different drugs in my time, experimenting as a young man and such, and marijuana is about the only one, including legal alcohol, that I would consider more of a light drug. It doesn't seize you like most drugs do, including prescription, which tend to be some of the most powerful and often have 'do not operate heavy machinery (cars, tractors, etc.) warnings on them.

    Finally, I think that most things in moderation are safe, and I don't think that people should spend their whole lives intoxicated as it will deter them in some cases of being more productive and ultimately happy with themselves in their life pursuits. However, while people shouldn't binge, it is 'high time (?)' that we let people make their own decisions when it comes to their own bodies. My experience tells me that while marijuana is a drug, it is not a villain.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 6:11 PM, snowcrave wrote:

    "Having a new revenue stream that can be used for whatever a state happens to need is a pretty good result of legalizing something that has been around for decades."

    Excuse me but I believe you mean millions of years not decades.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 8:42 PM, SELLmtg wrote:

    My opinion:

    How to profit from legalize marijuana ? Buy CBGI

    (a marijuana co. with 17.3 acres of marijuana land

    (Yahoo.finance. new 3/6) and CBGI also owns an

    online mmj store (news 2/26)). CBGI=0.2078 (as of 3/14) and will go up higher. Similar stock is CANN=$35.40 per share. CANN has only 3 acres and NO mmj store. CBGI will go up as high as CANN or higher.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 9:12 PM, rickinphil wrote:

    Not South Carolina. Those bigoted idiots would vote it down even if pot cured cancer.

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 11:05 PM, Michael1757 wrote:

    I also believe it should be legalized,& I know that it will bring in revenue,but once it does,I also hope that state workers don't immediately start lobbying for raises.Like Colorado,it should first be used for schools,then for the people with low incomes,seniors & disabled people.Then it should be put in a trust,bank,or place where people would be able to get loans on it,so we can start making tennis shoes for our troops,which are now made overseas,& personally,I don't/can't see how that ever got started.So,Ohio,are you listening?!!!

  • Report this Comment On March 16, 2014, at 11:32 PM, sammy92243 wrote:

    People make it sounds like everybody is going to smoke marijuana. Not everybody drinks or do hard drugs. The gate way is the mind of people. Marijuana is from god not man.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 12:12 AM, JohnThomas wrote:

    rickinphil - Pot DOES cure cancer. The government has known about it since the 1970s.

    (From RawReplay)

    "The cancer-killing properties of marijuana were the subject of discussion in a PBS documentary that aired this week to little media fanfare.

    While using marijuana to kill cancer may sound like a wild claim to some, it struck Dr. Prakash Nagarkatti as a great idea. In his studies as professor of pathology and microbiology for the University of South Carolina, he tested synthetic cannabis drugs on cancer cells and developed a formula that was able to completely eradicate cancer cells in a test tube.

    A follow-up on mice afflicted with cancer found that up to 30 percent in the test group completely rejected their disease, while others had their tumors significantly reduced. The same drug is now being tested on humans with Leukemia.

    But it’s not just Dr. Nagarkatti who sees the medical value of marijuana: it’s the whole pharmaceutical industry. And that’s another point the documentary makes, examining the patents various companies have filed, and what they claim marijuana-based drugs could one day be used to treat.

    The video below is just an excerpt from the full documentary, which originally aired in Montana amid a debate about repealing that state’s medical marijuana law. The full, nearly hour-long film is available to watch online for free."

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 7:44 AM, kingfish63 wrote:

    Texas needs to legalize or at least decrimenalize marijuana , our state waste millions of tax payers money on marijuana prosicutions , the jails and prisons are so over crowded, its waist of time and money the war on marijuana has never worked , if it was legalized it would stop the cartels half way in there tracks , Then law enforcement , feds, dea could cosintrate on the real crimenals ,hard drug dealers, drunk drivers and list go,s on , plus if legalized it will boost the econamy bring in billions in revenues it will take us out of this hole the goverment put us in . Its the new comodity and will create so many jobs , it can be regulated just like ALCAHOL AND TABACCO

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 7:54 AM, debyduz wrote:

    Politicians get extra money from kick backs in sponsoring legislation. Sure these are disguised and payments for speaking engagements or consultations and other jobs that don't truly fool us. They are earmark money for their special interests. This is nothing new.

    Now they see the big pot of money pot brings for them to get their grubby little hands on of course they will legalize it faster then the speed of light.

    This is no surprise.

    Guess what though it is not a good way to make money. Taxes from smoking, alcohol, gambling and now drugs. Profiting from the sins of humans.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 9:55 AM, TEXIZZ wrote:

    Money will trump common sense every time! America has expedited it's decline!

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 12:13 PM, Brian1 wrote:

    It is disturbing to see some debunked research coming from those opposed to the legalization of research. It's just more of the reefer madness line of thinking that reveals the opposition to legalization is based on lies from liars.

    It is also very disturbing to see the Republicans in the House of Representatives vote to sue the President to start prosecuting elderly cancer patients who use marijuana, among other people. This purely puts the Republican Party in strict hyper hypocrisy mode in light of the purported "principles" (which seem to change any time the Koch brothers tell them to).

    Let's look at their silliness:

    1. Stopping government waste and reducing spending: Polls show most Americans favor legalization because they view the war on pot as a costly, failed Republican boondoggle that drains $16-billion or more from our economy.

    2. Stopping government intrusion into our lives: The failed boondoggle of a drug war has made suspects of all Americans and crooks of all cops. A professor of Law Enforcement and former NYPD police Lieutenant estimate at least 50% of all law enforcement are on the take. They invade the homes of innocent people using false leads and made-up tips and kill people with military-style raids. They have killed babies. Pot has not. If you are against the war on pot then you support the killing of babies and the corruption of police and politicians. Baby killers.

    2. Following the strict interpretation of the Constitution: The Constitution protects us from unreasonable search and seizures. Yet police sieze property from innocent people and force the innocent to spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to get the property back. The Constitution also gives the President of the United States wide latitude to enforce laws in order to manage the resources available to the administration. Right now the average stay in prison for first-time drug offender is actually longer than time than child molesters, rapists and those convicted of manslaughter. So you Republicans are pro child molester, pro rapist and pro murderer. Typical.

    States Rights: A bit of a joke. Anybody around when I was in the 50s and 60s knows that states rights is code for Jim Crow and lynching people. Certainly Republican's belief in states rights doesn't seem to go beyond that, since the bill specifically states it is after states who have legalized medical and recreational marijuana.

    So there we have it: government waste, boondoggle, lost war, baby killing, sympathy for child molesters, rapists and murderers, unconstitutional behavior and government intrusion into people's private lives.

    As for other waste, lies and failures: Falling asleep at the wheel on 911, an elective war in Iraq that was supposed to pay for itself but cost $1Trillion dollars creating the largest increase in the national debt in the history of the nation, the temporary shut down of the nation, which costs $24-billion for absolutely nothing but ego crap. And now viscously going after states with a baby-killing drug war.

    Liars. Liars. Liars on everything they say they believe in.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 12:17 PM, Rockyvnvmc wrote:

    Even the deep South is beginning to come around. SC has just come up with a House bill that would allow compassionate cannabis usage as well as cultivation, for persons who have a note from their doctor, that it helps them. In other words, Medical Marijuana.

    Let's hope that it goes through !

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 12:29 PM, sogole wrote:

    Believe we are "Dopey" enough in America.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 2:51 PM, JohnThomas wrote:

    @debyduz - There has been billions of dollars spent on the greatest propaganda campaign in the planet's history against marijuana and marijuana consumers. - Did you miss it?

    No matter how much reformers spend, they could never match that. (Hint: It could only ever be a small fraction.)

    Sin? No thanks for the mythological reasons. Various religions hold marijuana to be their sacrament. Please stop the heresy.

    It sure is much healthier than the Catholic sacrament.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 2:53 PM, JohnThomas wrote:

    @sogole - Yes. We have been "dopey enough" to continue the monstrously destructive war on millions of good Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over addictive, very harmful alcohol.

    But we are wising up now.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 3:00 PM, greenknight32 wrote:

    The reason the State of Washington isn't mentioned is that sales haven't started yet, there is no revenue.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 4:04 PM, Honor wrote:

    In response to gpellison:

    Recreational smoking is not immoral, nor a sin. Whether it's a cash cow or not doesn't matter. The only dangerous characteristic of weed is that it's illegal. The fact that it's illegal is what is immoral, and violates personal liberty. You cannot accept that alcohol and nicotine are legal, yet argue against legalization of marijuana, which is by all measurable counts, safer than both.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 4:29 PM, buggsbunny wrote:

    Just think if we told, with billboards aimed at Mexico ,Marijuana was Legal in USA they would loose alot $$$$. cartels would be pissed! Waitin for the world to come together,waitin for start of dandelion wine.. Peace

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 7:29 PM, mare92662 wrote:

    marijuana aught to be legalized, it is a plant, you grow it, harvest it, dry it out, and smoke it, alcohol is stilled, processed and man made, i would trust something from the earth and givin by God before i would a man made substance, marijuana should have never been included in the drug wars, and it is not a gate to harder drugs, if it is in you to do other drugs you will do it regardless of pot or not, if you are going to rob and kill, you will do it, pot or not, too many times people use being high as an excuse to why they did it, cut the crap, marijuana will be legalized, it is just a matter of time, we need to start taking back our lives and our rights and our freedoms that our country was founded on, each individual aught to be responsible and punished for their own choices not everyone else, there will be less people in our jails and prisons if we did not jail people over a damn weed, quit wining and register to vote, you can bet if it is on the ballet here in ohio, I WILL VOTE FOR IT!!! i would love to see Obama legalize it on the federal level before his term is up, wouldn't that be something??

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 8:15 PM, ashamedamerican wrote:

    FACT: Traffic fatalities involving drivers on pot TRIPLED in Colorado in 2013, and it wasn't even legal there yet.

    Druggies have NO respect for laws or other people, and just grinding over everyone else just like every other addict. This country has literally gone to pot because of all the millions of unfit parents who 1) refused to do their jobs and 2) refused to make sacrifices for their own kids. They don't even put their bongs down for their kids.

    I don't want to see a bunch of stories about dead kids from pothead drivers like we're already seeing on drunk drivers. You decided this law was worth dead kids, so when people start burying them, SAY NOTHING just like you're sitting there saying nothing now while our country turns typical street drug dealer.

    Druggies are scum. There's no law in the land that will change that.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 9:33 PM, SELLmtg wrote:

    My opinion: Buy CBGI ( a marijuana co. with 17.3 acres of marijuana land (Yahoo.finance, news 3/6) and also owns an online mmj store (news 2/26).

    CBGI=0.2078 ( as of 3/14) and will go up higher.

    Similar stock is CANN=$36. per share, but CANN has only 3 acres and NO mmj store. CBGI will go up as high as CANN or higher.

  • Report this Comment On March 17, 2014, at 10:00 PM, Chrisk51 wrote:

    The very last line in that article was. "how to profit from legalization. Then the subject changes to banks. where is the profit part? where is the investment part. I'm thinking it would have to be legal nationally before we can really invest in it.

  • Report this Comment On March 18, 2014, at 8:39 AM, gdubb wrote:

    Just legalize it! They spend way to much to fight the use and steadily loosing the battle. Everyone that is against the use I would bet have never smoked it.

    The side affects are sleepy, hungry unlike the medical prescribed drugs purchased with several negative side affects. Liquor and beer along with cigarette's are much more aggressive causing many deaths and accidents. Have you ever heard of ONE person with those side affects above that smoke weed, pot, marijuana?

  • Report this Comment On March 18, 2014, at 10:59 AM, JohnThomas wrote:

    @ashamedamerican

    Anytime someone yells, "FACT!" - run for the hills, hold onto your wallet, and hide your daughters.

    NIDA sponsors lots of junk science to prop up the fraudulent marijuana prohibition. None of the studies, including yours, shows any CAUSALITY of accidents by marijuana consumption. They just twist statistics to make it look that way.

    Some people think marijuana consumption causes accidents like alcohol does. It doesn't, for various reasons. Research has shown marijuana is less intoxicating. More importantly, while alcohol drinkers think they are better drivers and so drive faster and more aggressively, marijuana consumers are very aware of their altered consciousness and correctly judge when they are too impaired to drive - refraining from doing so. If they must, they correctly compensate for their altered state by driving slower and more cautiously.

    The point is, judgment is not affected like it is with alcohol. Marijuana consumers simply don't put themselves or others in harm's way. Consequently, the preponderance of the research shows marijuana is NOT a significant cause of auto accidents

    The Hartford Courant confirms this:

    >>>"States that legalized the medical use of marijuana have had a drop in deadly automobile crashes, suggesting that some people who would otherwise drive drunk and kill someone are smoking weed instead, according to research by three economists."

    Can the demonization of millions of good Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over addictive, very harmful alcohol.

    SAMHSA research determined more than 100 million Americans have consumed marijuana. That's near HALF the of-age population. There are an estimated 30 to 50 million current consumers. The vast majority consume moderately - on the weekends or less, and are successful, hard-working, respected members of their communities. They are from all walks of life and loved by the families they support.

    Marijuana is as American as apple pie - and healthier.

  • Report this Comment On May 17, 2014, at 1:52 PM, AlcoholKills wrote:

    I'm so sick and tired of these idiotic people who are so blind and ignorant to the facts of Marijuana. How many people in the last ten years have you ever heard of smoking a joint, then wrecking into and killing a family of six? None!! Those kind of tragedies are due to...yep, you guessed it alcohol and OTC medication. Benadryl, sleeping pills, etc. Wake up America and do something about it. Marijuana is not going away. Actually, it's coming to a state near you. Accept it, grow, and go with it people. Marijuana's going to make me a millionaire and then we'll see who the fools are.

  • Report this Comment On May 18, 2014, at 8:31 PM, Doyle6543 wrote:

    Just make it legal in pa already I love weed everyone does it's not bad at all good people are getting in lots of trouble just for smoking a plant that makes you high

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