Why Citigroup Won’t Raise Its Dividend Next Week Even If It Wanted to

If it wasn't clear before, it seems to be now: There's little to no chance Citigroup (NYSE: C  ) will announce an increase to its dividend next week even though many of its closest competitors are expected to do so.

This shouldn't come as a surprise to investors who've followed the issue closely over the last few months. On a conference call in October, CEO Michael Corbat said:

I think the corporate finance math pretty clearly points you toward a preference of buyback versus dividend as your stock trades below book. And so I think that will be the first bias. But at that point, we also understand that we, to some degree, need to be mindful and over time continue to address the dividend issue. So we'll look at those trade-offs as we approach. But again, I think as has been very clearly signaled by the Fed, the bar around dividend is higher than buyback just based on the nature of what a dividend is, and so we'll have to take that into account.

But if Corbat left even the slightest opening for a dividend hike, it probably slammed shut last month with the uncovering of a $400 million fraud at Citigroup's operations in Mexico. The discovery forced the bank to restate is 2013 earnings and has called its compliance efforts into question.

"The financial impact will lower our 2013 net income by approximately $235 million," Corbat is quoted as telling employees. "The impact to our credibility is harder to calculate."

To be fair, the misstep appears to be an isolated incident. And more importantly, it's out of character with the new Citigroup that Corbat is trying to build. "So under the prior period a mistake like this would be one of many," bank analyst Mike Mayo told Bloomberg News, "whereas under the current CEO, Mike Corbat, this type of instance is more unique."

But regardless of intent, compliance issues like these could realistically cause the Federal Reserve to deny Citigroup's dividend request in the seemingly unlikely event that the bank made one. As the Fed explained in the guidance to this year's Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review process:

Even if [a bank passes the supervisory stress test,] the Federal Reserve could nonetheless object to that [bank's] capital plan for other reasons. These reasons include: There are outstanding material unresolved supervisory issues...

We saw this come up last year with respect to BB&T (NYSE: BBT  ) , which had its capital plans rejected after the Fed questioned how it calculated risk-weighted assets. At the time, there's was absolutely no question about BB&T's financial health. It was rather a matter of process.

So, where does this leave Citigroup shareholders? My guess is the bank has requested and will be approved for a modest share buyback program, but probably didn't request a dividend increase. It remains to be seen whether or not I'm right, but we'll know either way on March 26.

Are you looking for great dividend stocks?
With the stress tests in mind, our top analysts put together a free list of nine high-yielding stocks that should be in every income investor's portfolio. To learn the identity of these stocks instantly and for free, all you have to do is click here now.


Read/Post Comments (1) | Recommend This Article (1)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On March 19, 2014, at 9:54 AM, williambarty wrote:

    The author here is way out of bounds and probably doesn't really follow this stock or the sector. Certainly if he did, he would note the following facts about Citigroup and the industry:

    Citi is above Basel III requirements. Citi intends to maintain 0.5% above it. It is currently at 10.1%. This has Citi as of last quarter 0.6% over capitalized. If you multiply this by its RWA you get $7.1B over cap. This money will be returned to investors.

    The general number the fed seems okay with as far as dividend amounts go is 34% of income. This gives them $5 income * 34% = $1.70 to pay out per year.

    In the sector, JPM has been paying out its dividend throughout the multitude of Jamie Dimon's scandles. The fed has not blinked an eye. JPM did reduce their $15B buyback that year, but was allowed to raise their dividend even further at the next CCAR.

    True, Corbat and Gerspach did say that it would make sense to buyback anytime the stock is trading below book value. I agree with the author that this will be their focus, but shareholders demand dividends and you will see them also increase their to a sector competitive one.

    My prediction is a $10B buyback and a $1.20 per year dividend.

Add your comment.

DocumentId: 2880016, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 7/26/2014 1:44:04 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...

TREND TRACKER: Get Rich When the Web Goes Dark

It's time to say "goodbye" to your Internet! One bleeding-edge technology is about to put the World Wide Web to bed. And if you act right away, it could make you wildly rich. Experts are calling it the single largest business opportunity in the history of capitalism… The Economist is calling it "transformative"... but you'll probably just call it "how I made my millions." Big money is already on the move. Don't be too late to the party – find out the 1 stock to own when the Web goes dark.


Advertisement