Despite Bright Spots, Vanguard Natural Resources' Earnings Were Disappointing

Oil and gas producer Vanguard Natural Resources (NASDAQ: VNR  ) announced its first-quarter results on Tuesday, April 30. Despite a few positive notes, I must confess that I am disappointed with the company's bottom-line numbers and particularly its distributable per-unit cash flow.

Highlights from the report
Most of Vanguard's numbers increased significantly compared to the year-ago quarter. For example, sales increased to $152.7 million compared to the prior-year quarter in which Vanguard had total sales of approximately $96.7 million. This was due, at least in part, to the company's higher production. Vanguard produced a total of 268 million cubic feet equivalent of oil and natural gas in the first quarter compared to 199 million cubic feet equivalent in the prior-year quarter.

Unfortunately, this higher production also meant that Vanguard's operating and sales expenses increased. But overall Vanguard's net income increased substantially, with the company reporting net income of approximately $13.2 million compared to a net loss of $27 million in the first quarter of last year.

Pinedale acquisition
In the earnings press release, Vanguard's management seemed to be quite excited about the potential that its recent $581 million Pinedale acquisition provides to grow its earnings and cash flow going forward. For that reason, this acquisition seems like a good thing to discuss here.

The Pinedale property is located in Southwestern Wyoming and consists of 14,000 acres in the Pinedale Anticline and Jonah gas fields. At the time of the acquisition, the property contained 2,000 producing gas wells with 970 wells to be developed. This second part represents a new strategy for Vanguard Natural Resources, which previously was focused on acquiring mature producing assets. This is a strategy that Vanguard shared with companies such as Linn Energy and BreitBurn Energy Partners.

While this acquisition includes assets located in two fields, most of the production in the area comes from just one of the fields. At the time of the acquisition, the Pinedale Anticline was producing a total of 88.7 million cubic feet of natural gas per day compared to just 2 million cubic feet per day from Jonah.

Of course, not all of this production will be done by Vanguard. But, this acquisition is still the largest that the company has ever made. The acquisition nearly doubled the amount of resources that the company had in the ground, increasing Vanguard's reserves by 80%.

Acquisition greatly increases unit count
This acquisition, despite its benefits, is also one of the reasons for the negative aspects of this quarter's results. You see, Vanguard's policy is to pay out nearly all of its cash flow to its unitholders. While this is great for investors who need income, it makes it rather difficult for Vanguard to accumulate cash to make acquisitions like the one in the Pinedale. Therefore, in order to raise the capital to pay for deals like this, or at least some of the capital, Vanguard needs to issue more partnership units.

We see evidence of this by looking at the year-over-year change in the company's outstanding partnership units. At the end of the first quarter, Vanguard Natural Resources had approximately 79.6 million units outstanding compared to 64.8 million units outstanding at the end of the first quarter of last year. While not all of these trust units were issued to finance the Pinedale acquisition, some certainly were.

This increase in the company's units wouldn't be so bad if Vanguard's distributable cash flow increased by enough to increase the distributable cash flow on a per-unit basis. But, that wasn't the case. In the most recent quarter, Vanguard's distributable cash flow per unit was $0.52. In the first quarter of last year, Vanguard's distributable cash flow per unit was $0.61. This is because Vanguard's distributable cash flow barely increased despite the huge increase in units outstanding. This is a trend that investors should keep an eye on, as it is a bad sign if it continues.

3 stock picks to ride America's energy bonanza
Record oil and natural gas production is revolutionizing the United States' energy position. Finding the right plays while historic amounts of capital expenditures are flooding the industry will pad your investment nest egg. For this reason, the Motley Fool is offering a look at three energy companies using a small IRS "loophole" to help line investor pockets. Learn this strategy, and the energy companies taking advantage, in our special report "The IRS Is Daring You To Make This Energy Investment." Don't miss out on this timely opportunity; click here to access your report -- it's absolutely free. 


Read/Post Comments (2) | Recommend This Article (4)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On May 06, 2014, at 7:51 PM, zorro6204 wrote:

    They explained the shortfall and maintained 2014 guidance to well over 1.1 coverage, so I'll give them the benefit of the doubt, management is pretty good there.

    Still, two quarters in a row with under-water coverage is not something I've ever seen from VNR. Before the ENP acquisition, when growth was through bolt-on properties, they put coverage numbers as high as 1.4. ENP was suppose to be a killer, everyone thought they stole it from Denbury, but it added a lot of units, and since that point VNR coverage has been rather middle of the road. Sometimes slow and steady is better than big and flashy. Ask LINE.

  • Report this Comment On May 07, 2014, at 4:25 PM, Fury2012 wrote:

    Why with the down face? Everything you said makes VNR look darn good to me.

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 2946383, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 12/22/2014 10:11:44 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement